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Developmental supervision gordon_12_feb_

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Developmental supervision gordon_12_feb_

  1. 1. Developmental Supervision: An Exploratory Study of A Promising Model Journal Article Review By Tyrone Perkins EDAM 5320 Spring 2011 Dr Uribe
  2. 2. Developmental Supervision: An Exploratory Study of A promising Model In 1990 an article was published in the Journal of Education by Stephan Gordon at the University of Pennsylvania. (Glickman) Carl Glickman developed supervisory approached that called for educational leaders to have alternative approaches for supervising teachers to develop improved instruction and cognitive growth
  3. 3. Glickman’s Study Tactical Phase Strategic Phase Supervisor Diagnoses teacher Conceptual level (CL) Initially Low (CL ) Moderate (CL) High (CL) Select Supervisory Approaches: Directive (Directing and Standardizing) Collaborative (presenting, problem solving negotiating) Non directive (listening, clarifying, encouraging, reflecting)
  4. 4. The Supervisory Behavior Continuum Nondirective Collaborative Directive Control Directive Informational Teacher (Mutual plan) (Supervisor-suggested plan) (Supervisor Assign)
  5. 5. Directive Control Behaviors 1. Presenting: Identify the problem. 2. Clarifying: Ask teacher for input into the problem. 3. Listening: Attend carefully to understand the teacher’s point of view. 4. Problem Solving: Mentally determine the best solution 5. Directing: Tell expectations to the teacher. 6. Clarifying: Ask the teacher for input into the expectations. 7. Standardizing: Detail and modify expectations. 8. Reinforcing: Repeat and establish follow-up on expectations.
  6. 6. Directive Informational Behaviors 1. Presenting: Identify the goal. 2. Clarifying: Ask the teacher for input into the goal. 3. Listening: Attend carefully to understand the teacher’s point of view. 4. Problem Solving: Mentally determine possible actions. 5. Directing: Provide alternatives for the teacher to consider. 6. Listening: Ask the teacher for input into alternatives. 7. Directing: Frame the final choice. 8. Clarifying: Ask the teacher to choose. 9. Standardizing: Detail the actions to be taken. 10. Reinforcing: Repeat and suggest follow-up on the plan.
  7. 7. When to Use Directive Informational Behaviors 1. When the teacher or group is functioning at fairly low developmental levels 2. When the teacher or group does not possess the knowledge about an issue that the supervisor does 3. When the teacher or group feels confused, inexperienced, or at a loss for what to do, and the supervisor knows of successful practices 4. When the supervisor is willing to take responsibility for what the teacher or group chooses to try 5. When the teacher or group believes that the supervisor is credible 6. When time is short, the constraints are clear, and quick, concrete actions are needed
  8. 8. Comparing Directive Control with Directive Informational Directive Control Statements: It is essential that you… One of my expectations is that you… You need to… You must… You will be required to… I will… Directive Informational Statements: I suggest… One alternative is… You could… In my own teaching, I’ve found that… Which alternative do you wish to try? I would be willing to…
  9. 9. Research Focus of the study was to match the supervisors style with the teachers cognitive level during teachers post conference. Study Objectives Gathering Descriptive Data Supervisors effectiveness at using approaches (D. C. ND) Teachers view of the use of the approaches Supervisors view of the use of the approaches
  10. 10. Participants in the Study 1. There were 16 supervisors who were enrolled in either graduate supervision courses or workshops. 2. 47 teachers took part in the study and represented a range of urban, suburban, rural, elementary, middle and secondary schools as well as all the content areas.
  11. 11. Supervisor Training and Field Activities 3 hours training sessions Review of the principles and stages of clinical supervision. Training included video tape demonstrations, role play, presentation and feedback. Clinical supervision phases pre-conference, classroom observation, analysis, planning, post conference, action plan, follow up and post critique.
  12. 12. Case Study Conference items discussed: Missing lesson plans. Missing Grades for Art. Absence of a teacher’s webpage. Failure to use the district adopted lesson plan template. Failure to use comprehensive behavior charting system.
  13. 13. References Gordon, S. (1990). Developmental Supervision: An Exploratory Study of A Promising Model. Journal of Curriculum and Supervision Vol. 5 Num. 4 293-307

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