Developmental supervision

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  • I do not own such property. Uploaded for educational purposes only. High credits given to these websites and paper author: Burgess, Jeff. Reflective Paper (2002). EAD 6053 School Supervision.
    http://www.ascd.org/ASCD/pdf/journals/ed_lead/el_198705_glickman.pdf (with writers CARL D. GLICKMAN AND STEPHEN P. GORDON on CLARIFYING DEVELOPMENTAL SUPERVISION)
    These sources had helped me a lot in my report. Hope this could help others too...
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Developmental supervision

  1. 1. DEVELOPMENTAL SUPERVISION
  2. 2. Definition: Glickman defines DEVELOPMENTAL SUPERVISION as leadership for the improvement of instruction viewed as a function and a process rather than a role or position.
  3. 3. Underlying Propositions: 1.Teachers operate at different levels of professional development since they have varied personal backgrounds and experiences. 2.Teachers operate at differing levels of thought, ability and effectiveness thus they need to be supervised in different ways. 3.The long – range goal of supervision should be to increase every teacher’s ability to grow toward higher stages of thought.
  4. 4. SUPERVISOR’S TASK: Phase One: DIAGNOSTIC Supervisor makes diagnoses through: 1.Talking with and observing teachers in action and asking questions. 2.Observing classroom teaching behaviors.
  5. 5. Phase Two: TACTICAL Focuses on the immediate concern of helping teachers solve current instructional problems. Supervisory Approaches: 1. DIRECTIVE APPROACH - Supervisor provides teachers with a great deal of information and advice. This calls for high supervisor responsibility. - The supervisor does not attempt to force teachers to use a specific action but instead suggests alternatives for the teacher to consider and choose.
  6. 6. 2. COLLABORATIVE APPROACH - Supervisor works with teachers to share perceptions of a problem, propose alternatives, and negotiate a mutually designed plan of action. - The supervisor and teachers share responsibility for the final decision. 3. NONDIRECTIVE APPROACH - The supervisor invites teachers to define instructional problems themselves, generate actions, think through consequences and create their own action plans. This calls for low supervisor responsibility and high teacher responsibility for the final decision. - Supervisor encourages teachers make critical decisions and follow through on those decisions, and by being an involved facilitator, helping teachers clarify their perceptions and plans.
  7. 7. Phase Three: STRATEGIC Aimed at accelerating the development of teacher abstraction, helping teachers to think harder and smarter, and stimulating their problem – solving abilities. Strategies: 1.Gradually expose teachers to new ideas, ways of viewing students and instruction, problem – solving techniques and teaching methods. 2.Gradually lessen teachers dependence on the supervisor during decision – making conferences. 3.Involve teachers exhibiting lower levels of abstraction with teachers exhibiting slightly higher levels in problem – solving sessions.
  8. 8. References: Burgess, Jeff. Reflective Paper (2002). EAD 6053 School Supervision. http://www.ascd.org/ASCD/pdf/journals /ed_lead/el_198705_glickman.pdf

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