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Curating your online presence

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Workshop prepared for Emerging Professionals network, Museums Galleries Australia

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Curating your online presence

  1. 1. Curating your online presence Putting your best foot forward in the digital world MGA EP Workshop 4 June 2018
  2. 2. Introductions  Dr Regan Forrest  LinkedIn: linkedin.com/in/reganforrest/ (joined 2007)  Facebook: facebook.com/regan.forrest (joined 2008?)  Twitter: @interactivate (joined 2009)  Instagram: @interactivate (joined 2011?)  Blog: reganforrest.com.au (2010-2015)
  3. 3. Overview  Why curate an online presence?  Online presence basics  Overview of different platforms and their uses  BREAK  Creating and maintaining your LinkedIn profile  Twitter and tweeting at conferences  BREAK  Blogging  Summarise and share with other EP workshop groups
  4. 4. Why curate an online presence?  Develop your reputation/profile  Bounce, share, develop ideas  Be part of a global conversation  Be visible to prospective employers (or clients)  Have the tools to research and grow your network “I was hired because of the Internet” - Colleen Dilenschneider
  5. 5. Different online footprints  Social media (Twitter, LinkedIn, Facebook, Instagram)  Posts on by social platforms (e.g. LinkedIn articles)  Stand-alone blogs  Long-form platforms (e.g. Medium)  Specialist networking platforms (Academia.edu)  Podcasting / Video
  6. 6. Avatars: first impressions and branding
  7. 7. Avatar selection: considerations  Rule one – don’t have a blank avatar!!  People will associate you with it  Do you want to be recognisable?  Suitability to platform – format and style  Reflecting your personality and interests vs. keeping it generic  Consistency vs. changing with the times (age, stage of career, etc)  Background/cover images can add personality and context to a basic headshot
  8. 8. Professional headshot suite
  9. 9. Understanding different platforms (and who uses them) (2014 data)
  10. 10. Matching your presence to the platform Credit: @johnfoxUX via Twitter
  11. 11. Twitter Good for:  Conference hashtags  Following events in real time  Getting to know who’s who  Complementing with networking IRL Potential issues:  Brevity without context  Timezone sensitive (slightly less so lately)  Generally not where our visitors live “Australian Twitter is rubbish!” - @amyldale
  12. 12. Facebook Good for:  Very widely used platform  Groups and pages on areas of interest  Best platform for connecting to (most) museum audiences Potential issues:  Less “professional”  Privacy!  Algorithms can limit what you see
  13. 13. Instagram Good for:  Pictures say more than words  Fastest-growing among audiences  Hashtags Potential issues:  Lack of inbuilt reposting limits reach  Comments more than real dialogue  Supplementary rather than stand-alone platform (unless you’re in a highly visual area of work)
  14. 14. Instagram – suggested examples @timothylongfashioncurator @aaroncanipe @ladynaturalist @museummammy @latinainmuseums @museum_whisperer @amyldale @oliviameehan_
  15. 15. LinkedIn Good for:  Virtual business cards  Stay connected to colleagues who change employer  Monitor movements in the field  Being visible to recruiters and prospective employers  Online CV that can include more details than will fit on your application Potential issues:  Groups can be spammy  Unsolicited sales pitches  Random job suggestions and endorsements  Connection request etiquette
  16. 16. Curating online presence in academia  Academia.edu  Altmetrics  Mendeley  Google scholar
  17. 17. Discussion – other platforms?
  18. 18. Staying out of trouble online  Know your employer’s SM policy: follow it but don’t fear it  Don’t feed the trolls: disagree and debate respectfully  Consider separate personal & professional accounts  Internet memory is “unfairly long”  . . . But your views will evolve over time and that’s OK. Own it.
  19. 19. Be aware of biases (conscious or otherwise)  Whose voices are heard and amplified?  Whose aren’t?  Network or clique?  What assumptions are made about you online?  What assumptions do you make about others? Credit @MariamVeiszadeh via Twitter
  20. 20. Break
  21. 21. Creating your LinkedIn profile
  22. 22. Profile tips  Professional, recognisable profile picture  Customise your profile’s URL – and put this on your CV  Maintain a (reasonably) complete employment history  Add details as relevant to your career interests: publications, patents, projects, volunteering  Manage profile order – don’t just leave it to defaults
  23. 23. Managing employment history over time
  24. 24. LinkedIn profile clinic
  25. 25. Using LinkedIn as a networking tool  Consider writing articles or other activity to boost profile views  Write recommendations and endorsements (but only genuine ones)  Change settings if you’re job hunting (or open to offers)  Look up other people’s profiles prior to a meeting or job interview
  26. 26. Connection etiquette  Don’t be afraid to connect “up” – but only if there is a genuine link  Personal notes and “thanks for connecting” messages – thoughts???  Don’t bait-and-switch new connections by immediately trying to sell them something  Remember people can usually tell when you’ve looked at their profile, if they choose to  L.I.O.N.s
  27. 27. Researching others on LinkedIn  Search by name, skills, location, organisation  Research recruiters and selection panel members  See who’s connected to whom: request introductions (either on the platform or off)  Visibility on other platforms (e.g. Twitter)
  28. 28. Twitter profiles
  29. 29. Twitter at Conferences Features  Listen in on conversations and observe what people are finding interesting/ tweetworthy  Vicariously follow multiple parallel sessions  An icebreaker for meeting people IRL  Find others to mix with at social events  Matching handles to people (particularly speakers) Bugs  “What did she say while I was tweeting that??”  Device-juggling distractions  FOMO and session envy can be magnified
  30. 30. Not sure what to say?  Start with summarising: noncontroversial, don’t need anything of your own to share  Be useful: did a speaker mention a website or a report? Post a link to it with the conference hashtag  Watch and listen: follow the cue of others for tone and content if you’re not sure
  31. 31. Don’t forget – you probably know more than you think you know!
  32. 32. Break
  33. 33. Blogging – getting started  My first blog post: June 2010: http://reganforrest.com.au/2010/06/a-restless-and-disgruntled-visitor-writes-in-the-monthly/
  34. 34. Blogging: finding your voice  Subject matter: what interests you? What do you know something about? (What do you want to learn more about?)  Style: articles, listicles, note form, images, etc.  Go it alone or as part of a group?  Test the waters on other platforms: LinkedIn Articles, Medium, etc.
  35. 35. Don’t just post it, promote it!  Share new posts on other platforms  Build a subscriber base  Categories and tags for organising and searching
  36. 36. Blogging: keeping going 1 1 1 3 6 7 2 2 4 2 4 5 6 4 3 3 4 8 4 3 4 4 4 4 4 4 3 5 4 4 3 4 3 3 3 3 5 3 3 2 2 1 1 2 1 1 2 3 2 3 1 2 3 1 2 5 4 3 2 3 4 0 0 1 Number of Blog Posts
  37. 37. Blogging roadblocks  “Content fatigue”  Time and headspace  Sometimes it’s just too personal  Confidentiality and dirty laundry
  38. 38. Sample Blogging Layouts trevorodonnell.com
  39. 39. Sample Blogging Layouts museumtwo.blogspot.com.au/
  40. 40. Sample Blogging Layouts browngirlsmuseumblog.com
  41. 41. Sample Blogging Layouts notyourtypicalmuseumguy.wordpress.com
  42. 42. Blogging Frequency and Lifespan  Ed Rodley https://thinkingaboutmuseums.com/author/erodley/  Science 365: daily blogging for a year 2012-13 https://scienceforlife365.wordpress.com/about/  Please be seated https://stevetokar.wordpress.com/
  43. 43. Remember what I said about Impostor Syndrome?
  44. 44. Closing thoughts . . . “I’ve built a brand by being myself and I work hard not to stray far from that . . . But be a “yourself” who is true to you and also balances that with what you are trying to do and achieve. . .” - Colleen Dilenschneider

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