PEATLAND MANAGEMENTIMPACTS ONCARBON/CLIMATEREGULATION - UK EVIDENCE,SPATIAL CONFIGURATION OFSTOCKS AND PRESSURESFred Worra...
The approach I have taken to this problem UK evidence   JNCC report – other reports are also available   Meta-analysis – h...
Spatial extent of peat soils   Country     Peat type         sub-type         Area of peat                                ...
Spatial extent of peat soils                     We have soil maps for                     each part of UK                ...
Spatial extent of peat management/condition                       Burning                                   Bare soil This...
Emissions factors Meta-analysis   What is the probability that intervention will result in a   GHG benefit?   What is the ...
Summary of JNCC meta-analysisManagement               Likely spatial   Probability of   Effective sample   Existing study ...
Emission factors from computer modellingManagement                  From modelling                            (tonnes C ha...
Minimum input requirement approaches Run models with and without a management intervention Run models across the range of ...
Summary UK evidence   We know the quality of our emissions factor data   Our biggest source is lowland peat Spatial config...
The Durham Carbon Model already includes …                           Drains                                         Gullie...
The Durham Carbon Model now includes …Heather      Grasses                                   Mosses   Forest              ...
Modelling climate resilience                                                 1       Relative sink size compared to presen...
New Defra project – GHG emissions from lowland peat  New large scale project  measuing emissions from a  range of lowland ...
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Peatland management impacts on carbon/climate regulation - UK evidence, spatial configuration of stocks and pressures

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Presentation by Fred Worrall at VNN peatland workshop, Leeds 18th January 2012

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Peatland management impacts on carbon/climate regulation - UK evidence, spatial configuration of stocks and pressures

  1. 1. PEATLAND MANAGEMENTIMPACTS ONCARBON/CLIMATEREGULATION - UK EVIDENCE,SPATIAL CONFIGURATION OFSTOCKS AND PRESSURESFred Worrall,Department of Earth Sciences,Durham University
  2. 2. The approach I have taken to this problem UK evidence JNCC report – other reports are also available Meta-analysis – how much evidence do we have? Derivation of emissions factors Spatial configuration Spatial extent of peat soils – stocks Spatial extent of peat management/condition Ongoing developments
  3. 3. Spatial extent of peat soils Country Peat type sub-type Area of peat (km2) England Deep peat Total 6799a Lowland wasted 1922 peatb Upland peat 3553 Raised bog 357 Lowland fen 958 Other 9 Shallow peats 5272 Soils with 2114 scattered pockets of deep peat Scotlandd Total deep peat 17269 Wales Deep peats 706 Total peaty 2809 soils Northern Deep peats 1700c Worrall et al. (2011). Ireland UK Intact deep total 17125 JNCC Report 442 peat
  4. 4. Spatial extent of peat soils We have soil maps for each part of UK But for stocks assessment level of detail can vary Information on depth/density/carbon content is rare Some specific studies of certain areas (Exmoor, North Pennines)
  5. 5. Spatial extent of peat management/condition Burning Bare soil This level of spatial information is not available UK-wide.
  6. 6. Emissions factors Meta-analysis What is the probability that intervention will result in a GHG benefit? What is the equivalent number of studies do we have? Bayesian framework means that it is updatable Emission factors Default values – Couwenberg et al (2008) or Bryne et al. (2004) Values from UK field studies Values from computer modelling
  7. 7. Summary of JNCC meta-analysisManagement Likely spatial Probability of Effective sample Existing study site extent improvement size (GHG)Afforestation 5 2 Deforestation ? 2 Drainage 3 4 Drain-blocking ? 3 Grazing removal 1 1 Managed burning 4 Revegetation 2 4 5 Restoration of cutover 5 1 peatlandConverted for 3 ? ? agriculture
  8. 8. Emission factors from computer modellingManagement From modelling (tonnes C ha yr - Only an example of 1) the information in theAfforestation Peat soil +1.94a Above -3.87 JNCC report ground biomassb This can includeDeforestation - interactions betweenDrainage Average -0.05 Grazing +0.1 managements present Grazing -0.01 not present Burning +0.2 present Burning not -0.06 present
  9. 9. Minimum input requirement approaches Run models with and without a management intervention Run models across the range of locations for which we have inputs Over 4000 model runs Use statistical approaches to find the important drivers 2 CTotal 0.087 A 1.7 f peat 210 f baresoil 138.5 r 96 %, n 474
  10. 10. Summary UK evidence We know the quality of our emissions factor data Our biggest source is lowland peat Spatial configuration Spatial extent of peat soils Good but lacks supporting data to give stocks value Spatial extent of peat management/conditions good enough in places
  11. 11. The Durham Carbon Model already includes … Drains GulliesBare soil & revegetationburning Cutting
  12. 12. The Durham Carbon Model now includes …Heather Grasses Mosses Forest Sedge
  13. 13. Modelling climate resilience 1 Relative sink size compared to present 0.9 0.8 0.7 0.6 0.5 0.4 0.3 0.2 0.1 0 No action Block all Revegetate Cease grazing Cease burning Targeted best drains possible action Which interventions now would provide the most protection in the future? Projecting management interventions into the future under climate change scenarios. We could correct Efs for climate change
  14. 14. New Defra project – GHG emissions from lowland peat New large scale project measuing emissions from a range of lowland sites under a range of managements Managements include – fens, arable, dugover/bare peat, restored, pasture 4 major sites with several secondary sites

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