water@leeds    Peatland management  impacts on flood regulation                Joseph Holden                 water@leeds  ...
Key points are:• Impact of management on flood regulation from  peatlands depends on:   – Type of peat   – Its topographic...
• There are many ways in which a flood  could be impacted by peatlands: for  example, the peak could be  reduced/increased...
The type of peat and its location              matters• Valley peats, lowland fens, raised bogs, blanket  peat (lowland an...
• Flood storage service in some lowland  peatlands (e.g. Somerset Levels and Moors)• North Drain catchment Somerset Levels...
• Bullock and Acreman (2003) found that most,  but not all, studies (23 of 28) show that  floodplain wetlands reduce or de...
Upland blanket peat (87 % of peat in UK) is           source of quickflow                         • High water tables     ...
•Different vegetation types are also associated with different velocities offlow over the peat surface•Velocity of overlan...
The simulated hydrographs generated using for each vegetation re-establishment and management scenario in the Hollinscloug...
Is there really a signal of vegetation change within the          hydrograph at the catchment scale?
River Basin Processes and Management Research Cluster       Reported hydrological effects of peatland drainage            ...
River Basin Processes and Management Research Cluster                             Conway and Millar                       ...
River Basin Processes and Management Research Cluster  Long-term river flow change?• For exactly the same catchments as Co...
Lower water table = bufferto rain and less overlandflow (lower flood peak?)Drain network = betterconnection of flow tostre...
River Basin Processes and Management Research Cluster               Geography of the catchment - flood-routingFlood wave s...
intact % runoff from Oct 2002-2004 from different peat layers: 0-1cm            76 % 1-5cm            17 % 5-10cm         ...
• Modelling work has suggested that drain  blocking could reduce flood flows  downstream (Ballard et al., 2010 Journal  of...
DRIERHERE
Holden and Burt, 2003 J. Ecology
Area of catchment with topographic index affected by drains   Lane, Brookes, Holden and Kirkby (2004) Hydrological Processes
water@leeds               20               18                                                                             ...
From Acreman and Holden in prep(and diagram is not quite finalised)
Peatland management impacts on flood regulation
Peatland management impacts on flood regulation
Peatland management impacts on flood regulation
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Peatland management impacts on flood regulation

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Presentation by Joe Holden at VNN peatland meeting, Leeds 18th January 2012

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Peatland management impacts on flood regulation

  1. 1. water@leeds Peatland management impacts on flood regulation Joseph Holden water@leeds School of Geography University of Leeds
  2. 2. Key points are:• Impact of management on flood regulation from peatlands depends on: – Type of peat – Its topographic and catchment location – The intensity and configuration of management – The location of management with respect to river channels – the same management on the same type of peat can have a very impact depending on where you are in the catchment and flood wave synchronicity – There is more than just ‘a type of management’ to think about – I push for us to think about the surface condition of the peat (degradation etc) - to which management may contribute - as this may impact velocities of overland flow.
  3. 3. • There are many ways in which a flood could be impacted by peatlands: for example, the peak could be reduced/increased, the timing could be delayed/sped up or the volume changed.
  4. 4. The type of peat and its location matters• Valley peats, lowland fens, raised bogs, blanket peat (lowland and upland) etc.• Upland blanket peat is generally a source of flooding.• Lowland fen could be a sink for flooding (and attenuate floods), but this really does depend on management and topographic setting.• Valley mires may act as buffers for floods (or not, depending on season, and location).
  5. 5. • Flood storage service in some lowland peatlands (e.g. Somerset Levels and Moors)• North Drain catchment Somerset Levels - water table levels pumped to 1-2 m below mean field level during the winter. Should all land owners raise water levels the 3.6 million m3 of flood storage would not be available.
  6. 6. • Bullock and Acreman (2003) found that most, but not all, studies (23 of 28) show that floodplain wetlands reduce or delay floods, with examples from all regions of the world.• For headwaters, around half of the studies (11 of 20 for flood event volumes and 8 of 13 for wet period flows) show that headwater wetlands increase the immediate response of rivers to rainfall, generating higher volumes of flood flow, even if the peak flow is not increased
  7. 7. Upland blanket peat (87 % of peat in UK) is source of quickflow • High water tables (typically within 40 cm of the surface for 80 % of the time) • Saturation-excess (‘overland flow’) • Low hydraulic conductivity at depth
  8. 8. •Different vegetation types are also associated with different velocities offlow over the peat surface•Velocity of overland flow in 1024 plots for different slopes and cover typesand water depths•Empirical data used to produce a model for peatland flow•A first order estimate of Darcy-Weisbach roughness and mean velocity can bebased on a single parameter for each peat surface cover. 1 Unvegetated Eriophorum Sphagnum velocity, m . s-1 0.1Example shown here is amodelled relationship betweenmean flow depth and velocity on 0.01a 10 % gradient. 0.001 0.001 0.01 0.1 depth, m Holden et al (2008) Water Resources Research
  9. 9. The simulated hydrographs generated using for each vegetation re-establishment and management scenario in the Hollinsclough catchment 1 is complete Sphagnum cover and 2 is bare peat = there are large differences in flood peaks
  10. 10. Is there really a signal of vegetation change within the hydrograph at the catchment scale?
  11. 11. River Basin Processes and Management Research Cluster Reported hydrological effects of peatland drainage Temp Flood annual Meas. Proc. Process discussion Store peak runoff scale Meas.Lewis 1957 C X storageOliver 1958 C X storageHowe 1960 X X XConway & Millar 1960 H X Storage, burningMustona 1964 H X XBurke 1967 H WT storageHowe et al. 1967 C X drainage densityBaden & Egglesmann 1970 H X storage, OLFInst. of Hydrology 1972 C X storageMoklyak et al. 1975 C X YES - lotsHeikurainen 1976 H X XAhti 1980 H X drainage densityRobinson 1986 H X YES - lotsNewson & Robinson 1983 C X Catch. character.Guertin et al. 1987 X X XGunn & Walker 2000 H X veg. changesHolden et al. (2004) Progress in Physical Geography School of Geography, University of Leeds
  12. 12. River Basin Processes and Management Research Cluster Conway and Millar (1960) showed drainage: -increased peak flows -Increased annual water yield - decreased low flows Data from initial few years after drainage compared with control catchmentsSchool of Geography, University of Leeds
  13. 13. River Basin Processes and Management Research Cluster Long-term river flow change?• For exactly the same catchments as Conway and Miller:• Compared data from 1950s with 2002-2004• No change for undrained catchments in water yield or storm hydrograph characteristics• Drained catchments had changed: – Significantly increased yield (15 %) – Lower peak flows – Longer recession limbs• Short-term studies immediately after drainage do not capture full nature of hydrological response and caution needed if predicting long-term changeHolden et al (2006) J. Environmental Quality School of Geography, University of Leeds
  14. 14. Lower water table = bufferto rain and less overlandflow (lower flood peak?)Drain network = betterconnection of flow tostream (higher flood peak)?Vegetation change = higherflood peak?Depends on scale, peattype, topography, streamconfiguration etc
  15. 15. River Basin Processes and Management Research Cluster Geography of the catchment - flood-routingFlood wave synchronicity iscrucial School of Geography, University of Leeds
  16. 16. intact % runoff from Oct 2002-2004 from different peat layers: 0-1cm 76 % 1-5cm 17 % 5-10cm 6% 10-50cm 1% 50 cm + 0%drained % runoff from Oct 2002-2004 from different peat layers: 0-1cm 37 % 1-5cm 12 % 5-10cm 25% 10-50cm 15 % 50 cm + 11 %
  17. 17. • Modelling work has suggested that drain blocking could reduce flood flows downstream (Ballard et al., 2010 Journal of Hydrology).• But this may depend on the angle of the drains with respect to the slope (Lane and Milledge in press)
  18. 18. DRIERHERE
  19. 19. Holden and Burt, 2003 J. Ecology
  20. 20. Area of catchment with topographic index affected by drains Lane, Brookes, Holden and Kirkby (2004) Hydrological Processes
  21. 21. water@leeds 20 18 I1 I2 16 I3 I4 14 I5 I6 12 Interquartile range patterns in waterd75-d25, cm I7 I9 10 table for each month 8 6 4 2 0 Jan- Feb- Mar- Apr- May- Jun- Jul- Aug- Sep- Oct- Nov- Dec- Jan- Feb- Mar- Apr- May- Jun- 05 05 05 05 05 05 05 05 05 05 05 05 06 06 06 06 06 06 20 20 24.7 18 D1 D2 18 B1 B2 16 D3 D4 16 B3 B4 D5 D6 14 B5 B6 14 D7 D8 B7 B8 12 12 D9 d75-d25, cm B9 d75-d25, cm 10 10 8 8 6 6 4 4 2 2 0 0 Jan- Feb- Mar- Apr- May- Jun- Jul- Aug- Sep- Oct- Nov- Dec- Jan- Feb- Mar- Apr- May- Jun- Jan- Feb- Mar- Apr- May- Jun- Jul- Aug- Sep- Oct- Nov- Dec- Jan- Feb- Mar- Apr- May- Jun- 05 05 05 05 05 05 05 05 05 05 05 05 06 06 06 06 06 06 05 05 05 05 05 05 05 05 05 05 05 05 06 06 06 06 06 06
  22. 22. From Acreman and Holden in prep(and diagram is not quite finalised)

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