Successfully reported this slideshow.
We use your LinkedIn profile and activity data to personalize ads and to show you more relevant ads. You can change your ad preferences anytime.

Sustainable development 4

14,164 views

Published on

Published in: Education, Technology
  • 1 minute a day to keep your weight away! ★★★ http://t.cn/A6PnIVD3
       Reply 
    Are you sure you want to  Yes  No
    Your message goes here
  • I purchased your e-book, How to Reverse Diabetes. This is really an amazing life-saving book, it's a blessing beyond words. I've downloaded your program because my dad has been suffering from diabetes for a very long time but now, thanks to your help, his blood sugar level is well within normal range and all his symptoms are gone. I cannot explain in words how much this book has meant to me and my family. I just want to let you know that your program has totally changed my life; you truly are a blessing for humanity. People need to hear your message because it can save many many people’s lives. The world needs more people like you. From the bottom of my heart, thank you thank you thank you! ●●● http://ishbv.com/matt1a/pdf
       Reply 
    Are you sure you want to  Yes  No
    Your message goes here
  • DOWNLOAD FULL BOOKS, INTO AVAILABLE FORMAT ......................................................................................................................... ......................................................................................................................... 1.DOWNLOAD FULL. PDF EBOOK here { https://tinyurl.com/y3nhqquc } ......................................................................................................................... 1.DOWNLOAD FULL. EPUB Ebook here { https://tinyurl.com/y3nhqquc } ......................................................................................................................... 1.DOWNLOAD FULL. doc Ebook here { https://tinyurl.com/y3nhqquc } ......................................................................................................................... 1.DOWNLOAD FULL. PDF EBOOK here { https://tinyurl.com/y3nhqquc } ......................................................................................................................... 1.DOWNLOAD FULL. EPUB Ebook here { https://tinyurl.com/y3nhqquc } ......................................................................................................................... 1.DOWNLOAD FULL. doc Ebook here { https://tinyurl.com/y3nhqquc } ......................................................................................................................... ......................................................................................................................... ......................................................................................................................... .............. Browse by Genre Available eBooks ......................................................................................................................... Art, Biography, Business, Chick Lit, Children's, Christian, Classics, Comics, Contemporary, Cookbooks, Crime, Ebooks, Fantasy, Fiction, Graphic Novels, Historical Fiction, History, Horror, Humor And Comedy, Manga, Memoir, Music, Mystery, Non Fiction, Paranormal, Philosophy, Poetry, Psychology, Religion, Romance, Science, Science Fiction, Self Help, Suspense, Spirituality, Sports, Thriller, Travel, Young Adult,
       Reply 
    Are you sure you want to  Yes  No
    Your message goes here
  • DOWNLOAD FULL BOOKS, INTO AVAILABLE FORMAT ......................................................................................................................... ......................................................................................................................... 1.DOWNLOAD FULL. PDF EBOOK here { https://tinyurl.com/y3nhqquc } ......................................................................................................................... 1.DOWNLOAD FULL. EPUB Ebook here { https://tinyurl.com/y3nhqquc } ......................................................................................................................... 1.DOWNLOAD FULL. doc Ebook here { https://tinyurl.com/y3nhqquc } ......................................................................................................................... 1.DOWNLOAD FULL. PDF EBOOK here { https://tinyurl.com/y3nhqquc } ......................................................................................................................... 1.DOWNLOAD FULL. EPUB Ebook here { https://tinyurl.com/y3nhqquc } ......................................................................................................................... 1.DOWNLOAD FULL. doc Ebook here { https://tinyurl.com/y3nhqquc } ......................................................................................................................... ......................................................................................................................... ......................................................................................................................... .............. Browse by Genre Available eBooks ......................................................................................................................... Art, Biography, Business, Chick Lit, Children's, Christian, Classics, Comics, Contemporary, Cookbooks, Crime, Ebooks, Fantasy, Fiction, Graphic Novels, Historical Fiction, History, Horror, Humor And Comedy, Manga, Memoir, Music, Mystery, Non Fiction, Paranormal, Philosophy, Poetry, Psychology, Religion, Romance, Science, Science Fiction, Self Help, Suspense, Spirituality, Sports, Thriller, Travel, Young Adult,
       Reply 
    Are you sure you want to  Yes  No
    Your message goes here

Sustainable development 4

  1. 1. UNDERSTANDING & LEADING SUSTAINABLE DEVELOPMENT Phil Lane, Jr. Four Worlds International www.fwii.net
  2. 2. Overview
  3. 3. The term “sustainable development” is being used in many different ways, for example: In the context of forestry, sustainable development can mean the harvesting of trees and other forest products at a rate that does not exceed the capacity of the forest to regenerate itself.
  4. 4. In the context of urban planning, sustainable development can mean managing growth within the capacity of infrastructure to service the population.
  5. 5. In the context of health promotion, sustainable development can mean a pace and type of economic activity that does not jeopardize the wellbeing of people.
  6. 6. In the context of international development projects, sustainable development can mean those activities designed not to exceed the socio-ecological capacity of the community to carry on from within.
  7. 7. Talking Circle Topic: What are other contexts within which you have heard the term sustainable development being used?
  8. 8. Social World Natural World Human Thinking & Activity Understanding & Leading Sustainable Development will focus on how human thinking and activity influence both the social and natural worlds
  9. 9. Module I: Coming to Terms
  10. 10. What is development? The root of the word “ development” is the French word développer - to unroll or unwrap
  11. 11. A process by which potentialities become apparent; by which a fuller, greater or better state is realized Development:
  12. 12. A process through which something is made more available or put into use A process through which something is exploited, or converted into a new function, or has its value increased Development:
  13. 13. What is sustainability? The capacity to keep up or keep going
  14. 14. The capacity to supply with necessities or nourishment; to provide for The capacity to support, hold, or bear up from below; bear the weight of Sustainability:
  15. 15. What is sustainable development? In 1980 the International Union for the Conservation of Nature published the World Conservation Strategy in which the term “ sustainable development ” was first used.
  16. 16. Development is sustainable if it “meets the needs of the present without comprom-ising the ability of future generations to meet their own needs”. (The 1987 Brundtland Commission, set up by the United Nations General Assembly)
  17. 17. “ Sustainable development is a socio-ecological process characterized by the fulfillment of human needs while maintaining the quality of the natural environment indefinitely. ” (Wikipedia) Other Definitions:
  18. 18. “… sustainable development is interpreted as a common currency that both unifies environmental, social and economic values and links today ’ s choices to tomorrow ’ s consequences. ” (A Guide to Sustainability, from Canadian Choices for Transitions to Sustainability, Ottawa: Projet de societe, May 1995)
  19. 19. “ Sustainable development involves the simultaneous pursuit of economic prosperity, environmental quality and social equity.” (World Business Council on Sustainable Development)
  20. 20. “ Sustainability is meeting the needs of all humans, being able to do so on a finite planet for generations to come while ensuring some degree of openness and flexibility to adapt to changing circumstances. ” (Jerry Sturmer, Santa Barbara South Coast Community Indicators)
  21. 21. “ Human beings are at the center of concern for sustainable development. They are entitled to a healthy and productive life in harmony with nature. ” (Rio Declaration, adopted by the United Nations conference on Environment and Development in 1992)
  22. 22. “ In the final analysis sustainable development is about long-term conditions for humanity ’ s multi-dimensional well-being. ” (Soubbotina, Beyond Economic Growth , The World Bank, 2004)
  23. 23. Criticisms of Current Definitions of Sustainable Development They do not provide clear guidance about what to do differently. 1.
  24. 24. Current uses of the term “sustainable development” in policy documents: They tend to favour the continued growth of industrialized nations at the expense of development in poorer nations. Economic policies based on concepts of growth and the continued depletion of resources cannot be sustainable. 2. 3.
  25. 25. An Indigenous view of Sustainable Development The closest equivalent that the Cuna Tribe of Panama has for the term “sustainable” is the word harmonious Harmony with all living things In tune Peaceful Marked by agreement
  26. 26. Talking Circle Topic: What other definitions of sustainable development have you heard/used? Which definition do you prefer? Why?
  27. 27. Module II: Models for Exploring Sustainable Development
  28. 28. Interdependent and Mutually Reinforcing Pillars of Sustainable Development United Nations 2005 World Summit Outcome Document Social Development Environ- mental Protection Economic Develop- ment
  29. 29. A Fourth Pillar “… cultural diversity is as necessary for humankind as biodiversity is for nature.” Sustainable development cannot be understood “simply in terms of economic growth, but also as a means to achieve a more satisfactory intellectual, emotional, moral and spiritual existence”. Universal Declaration on Cultural Diversity (UNESCO, 2001)
  30. 30. Culture: how human beings make sense of the world <ul><li>how people think, learn and solve problems, what they value and respect, what attracts and delights them, what offends them and their sense of what is appropriate </li></ul><ul><li>the soil in which the tree of identity </li></ul><ul><li>has its roots </li></ul><ul><li>manifest s itself in human relations, </li></ul><ul><li>systems of organization, technology, </li></ul><ul><li>arts, politics, economics, community </li></ul><ul><li>life - all the things that humans do. </li></ul>
  31. 31. A Metaphor for Culture <ul><li>Music </li></ul><ul><li>Folklore </li></ul>Primary Culture highly patterned implicit rules of behavior hidden cultural grammar Language Laws Food Visible Culture Customs Artifacts and Behaviour Beliefs and Values Assumptions
  32. 32. Primary Level Culture <ul><li>There is an underlying, hidden level of culture that is highly patterned – a set of unspoken, implicit rules of behavior and thought that controls everything we do. This hidden cultural grammar defines the way in which people view the world, determines their values, and establishes the basic tempo and rhythms of life. Most of us are either totally unaware or else only peripherally aware of this. I call these hidden paradigms primary level culture . ( E.T. Hall) </li></ul>
  33. 33. Other Metaphors for Culture <ul><li>The collective programming of the mind which distinguishes the members of one group from another - the software of the mind </li></ul><ul><li>The eyes through which </li></ul><ul><li>we see the world </li></ul>
  34. 34. It can also be useful to speak about political sustainability, which refers to the processes through which decisions are made and power is arranged and distributed.” (Bopp & Bopp, Recreating the World , 2006) Adding One More Pillar
  35. 35. Putting it All Together Political Partici- pation Economic Develop- ment Cultural Diversity Social Develop- ment Environmental Protection
  36. 36. What are the desired outcomes of sustainable development? <ul><li>Clean water & air </li></ul><ul><li>Fertile soil & </li></ul><ul><li>good food </li></ul><ul><li>A livelihood & a </li></ul><ul><li>healthy economy </li></ul><ul><li>An optimum </li></ul><ul><li>population size </li></ul><ul><li>Safety from poverty </li></ul><ul><li>& disease </li></ul><ul><li>Social contact & a </li></ul><ul><li>sense of community </li></ul><ul><li>Work, rest & </li></ul><ul><li>celebration </li></ul><ul><li>Opportunities to </li></ul><ul><li>learn </li></ul><ul><li>Halting global warming </li></ul>
  37. 37. Characteristics of Sustainable Development that Lead to these Outcomes Economic development is carried out in a way that is equitable for all the world’s peoples. Equitable Social Development Economic Development
  38. 38. Economic development is carried out in a way that is viable in terms of environmental protection. Viable Environ- mental Protection Economic Develop- ment
  39. 39. Bearable Social develop-ment that is bearable by the environment. Environ- mental Protection Social Development
  40. 40. Environ- mental Protection Economic Develop- ment Social Development Bearable Equitable Viable Sustainable
  41. 41. <ul><li>CIDA’s Framework identifies key features for the “pillars” of sustainable development: </li></ul><ul><li>Environmental sustainability </li></ul><ul><li>Economic development </li></ul><ul><li>Social development </li></ul><ul><li>Cultural diversity </li></ul><ul><li>Political participation </li></ul>
  42. 42. Environmental Protection <ul><li>Ecosystem integrity </li></ul><ul><li>Biological diversity </li></ul><ul><li>Managed population size </li></ul>
  43. 43. Environmental Protection Political Participation Human rights Democratic development Good governance
  44. 44. Political Participation Economic Development Appropriate economic policies Efficient resource allocation More equitable access to resources Increasing the productive capacity of the poor Environmental Protection
  45. 45. Political Participation Economic Development Social Development Improved income distribution Gender equity Investing in basic health & education Emphasizing participation of the beneficiaries Environmental Protection
  46. 46. Political Participation Economic Development Cultural Diversity Sensitivity to cultural factors Recognition of values conducive to development Social Development Environmental Protection
  47. 47. The Medicine Wheel Model A Powerful Mapping Tool A Universal Archetype
  48. 48. The Individual Physical Mental Spiritual Emotional The Medicine Wheel Model
  49. 49. The Medicine Wheel Model The Family or Clan Dominant Thinking Patterns Cultural & Spiritual Patterns Human Relations Physical Environment & Economy
  50. 50. Political & Administrative Cultural & Spiritual Economic & Environmental Social The Community The Medicine Wheel Model
  51. 51. The Wider World Cultural Environment Political & Ideological Environment Economic & Ecological Environment Social Environment The Medicine Wheel Model
  52. 52. The Medicine Wheel Model: An Integrated Systems Approach Area or Country Community Family or Clan Individual
  53. 53. Vision The Medicine Wheel Model: Vision The Wider World Community The Person Volition Participation Family, Clan or Group
  54. 54. Talking Circle Topic: Develop your own model that shows which domains of human activity need to be harmonized to achieve sustainable development.
  55. 55. Module III: Strategies for Implementing Sustainable Development
  56. 56. Three Key Strategies Systems Thinking: Using a determinants approach Transdisciplinarity: Working beyond the boundaries Working from Principle 1 . 2 . 3 .
  57. 57. Systems Thinking: Using a determinants approach
  58. 58. Brainstorming question: What are the things that people need to have a sustainable life?
  59. 59. Aboriginal Community- identified Determinants of Health <ul><li>Basic physical </li></ul><ul><li>needs </li></ul><ul><li>Spirituality & </li></ul><ul><li>a sense of </li></ul><ul><li>purpose </li></ul><ul><li>Life-sustaining values, morals & ethics </li></ul><ul><li>Safety & security </li></ul>Kashechewan Water Samples
  60. 60. <ul><li>Adequate income and sustainable economics </li></ul><ul><li>Adequate power </li></ul><ul><li>Social justice and equity </li></ul><ul><li>Cultural </li></ul><ul><li>integrity and </li></ul><ul><li>identity </li></ul>
  61. 61. <ul><li>Community solidarity and social support </li></ul><ul><li>Strong families and healthy child development </li></ul><ul><li>Healthy eco-system and a sustainable relationship between human beings and the natural world </li></ul>
  62. 62. <ul><li>Critical learning opportunities </li></ul><ul><li>Adequate human services & social safety net </li></ul><ul><li>Meaningful work </li></ul><ul><li>& service to </li></ul><ul><li>others </li></ul>
  63. 63. Case Example: The Pathways to Prosperity Program
  64. 64. Pathways to Prosperity Program Presented by United Indians of All Tribes Foundation Initial funding provided by the Northwest Area Foundation
  65. 65. To assist our Native Community in the journey from poverty to well-being Program Goal
  66. 66. Critical Challenges facing the Seattle Native American Community <ul><li>30% live below the poverty line </li></ul><ul><li>Highest level of homelessness of any group </li></ul><ul><li>Real unemployment levels are near 25% </li></ul>
  67. 67. <ul><li>Highest levels of: </li></ul><ul><li>infant mortality rate </li></ul><ul><li>diabetes, heart disease and cancer </li></ul><ul><li>addictions and chronic mental health issues </li></ul><ul><li>disabilities </li></ul>Critical Challenges facing the Seattle Native American Community
  68. 68. What is poverty? Poverty is not simply “a lack of jobs or income”, but rather “a web of interwoven problems—poor schooling, bad health, family troubles, racism, crime and unemployment—that can lock families out of opportunity, permanently”. Joan Walsh “Stories of Community Building and the Future of Urban America”
  69. 69. The Tree of Poverty has many roots
  70. 70. What Determines Poverty? <ul><li>Poor health </li></ul><ul><li>2. Weak cultural and spiritual identity </li></ul><ul><li>3. Unmet basic needs </li></ul><ul><li>4. Lack of basic safety and security </li></ul><ul><li>5. Fractured social networks </li></ul>
  71. 71. What Determines Poverty? <ul><li>6. Poor education </li></ul><ul><li>7. Unemployment/low wages </li></ul><ul><li>8. Poor access to social services </li></ul><ul><li>Racism and discrimination in society </li></ul><ul><li>10. Ineffective public policy </li></ul>
  72. 72. Our Primary Strategy <ul><li>Transform the </li></ul><ul><li>Determinants of Poverty </li></ul><ul><li>into the </li></ul><ul><li>Determinants of Well-being </li></ul>
  73. 73. Determinants of Well-being Poor health Vibrant health Weak cultural and spiritual identity Strong cultural and spiritual identity Unmet basic needs Basic needs fulfilled Lack of basic safety and security Personal safety and security Fractured social networks Strong social networks
  74. 74. Determinants of Well-being Poor education Appropriate education and training Unemployment/low wages Adequate income opportunities Poor access to social services Appropriate and adequate social services Racism and discrimination in society A societal climate that appreciates diversity and fosters inclusion Ineffective public policy Effective public policy
  75. 75. Pathway to Prosperity Four Strategic Elements <ul><li>Address the Determinants of Poverty </li></ul><ul><li>Use a holistic systems approach </li></ul><ul><li>3. Working from principle </li></ul><ul><li>4. Start small before scaling up </li></ul>
  76. 76. Pathways to Prosperity Program <ul><li>A comprehensive web of opportunities that form a pathway </li></ul>
  77. 77. The Journey What do people need to make the journey from chronic poverty and dependency to sustainable well-being and prosperity? Poverty Prosperity jobs skills culture help healing connect ? support
  78. 78. Nine Lines of Action for Promoting Prosperity and Wellbeing
  79. 79. – 1 – Education and Training Day Break Star College United Indians Headstart and Early Headstart Literacy Family Strengthening Early childhood development Community Development Wellness Employment skills Leadership Development Cultural Foundations Entrepreneurial Development Job Readiness Strengthening Community Institutions And Programs Parenting Education Life Skills GED
  80. 80. – 2 – Health and Wellness <ul><li>Healing and recovery from the impacts of trauma </li></ul><ul><li>Addiction recovery </li></ul><ul><li>Personal growth </li></ul><ul><li>Access to health services </li></ul><ul><li>Community action for health </li></ul><ul><li>Influencing public policy </li></ul>
  81. 81. – 3 – Cultural and Spiritual Revitalization Elders Council Drawing on Cultural Leaders Cultural Research Culturally based education and training Applying Cultural Knowledge to Development Problems Cultural events and gatherings Cultural based enterprises Culture
  82. 82. – 4 – Community Building Community involvement in program governance Community Learning and Planning Community-based Research and Evaluation Community Engagement in Strategic Action
  83. 83. – 4 – Community Building <ul><li>Specifically: </li></ul><ul><li>Bernie Whitebear Center for Human and Community Development </li></ul><ul><li>Quarterly gatherings for evaluation, learning and planning </li></ul><ul><li>Community core groups </li></ul><ul><li>Community learning processes </li></ul><ul><li>Community based enterprises </li></ul>
  84. 84. – 5 – Offering a “hand-up” and “bridge-building” <ul><li>Targeted small scale help to families already engaged in the journey </li></ul><ul><ul><li>E.g.., a bus pass, help with groceries until month end, child care emergencies </li></ul></ul><ul><li>Access to micro-loans </li></ul><ul><li>Access to affordable housing </li></ul><ul><li>One stop shopping and connection to support and opportunities </li></ul>
  85. 85. – 6 – Community Economic Development <ul><li>Building individual and community capacity for economic success </li></ul><ul><li>Job placement and support </li></ul><ul><li>Small business incubation and support </li></ul><ul><li>Social enterprise initiative </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Teepee Camp </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Salmon Bake Center </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Northwest Canoe House </li></ul></ul><ul><li>Capitalization of Native community business development </li></ul>Goal: establish a Native American Community Economic Development Corporation
  86. 86. – 7 – Partnership Building <ul><li>Circle of partners to be established to ensure all needed services are available </li></ul><ul><li>Special focus on partnerships with other minorities, organizations and groups working on poverty issues </li></ul>
  87. 87. – 8 – Strategic Communication <ul><li>Using media for education and community development </li></ul><ul><li>Community participation to ensure strong community voice </li></ul><ul><li>Strategic dialogue between partners </li></ul><ul><li>4. Communicate lessons learned to wider world, funders, and other communities </li></ul>
  88. 88. – 9 – Public Policy Engagement <ul><li>Policy research relevant to poverty alleviation </li></ul><ul><li>Systematic outreach to public policy makers </li></ul><ul><li>Focus on influence through constructive dialogue </li></ul>
  89. 89. Transdisciplinarity: Working beyond boundaries
  90. 90. <ul><li>environmental protection, </li></ul><ul><li>political participation </li></ul><ul><li>economic development, </li></ul><ul><li>social development </li></ul><ul><li>cultural diversity </li></ul>cannot be achieved from the stand-point of a single discipline or programmatic stream . Efforts to promote sustainable development
  91. 91. Global consensus agrees Sustainable development cannot be achieved until three key issues are addresses <ul><li>extreme poverty, </li></ul><ul><li>centuries-old </li></ul><ul><li>conflicts, and </li></ul><ul><li>environmental </li></ul><ul><li>degradation </li></ul>
  92. 92. Resolving these key issues requires: <ul><li>collaborative and </li></ul><ul><li>creative work </li></ul><ul><li>that steps outside </li></ul><ul><li>traditional boundaries </li></ul>
  93. 93. Transdisciplinarity is a process and way of working that transcends the boundaries of contributing disciplines and generates new logical frameworks, new methodologies and new knowledge and insights from the synergy that is created between them. (Bopp 2001)
  94. 94. Case Example: Sagamok Anishnawbek First Nation
  95. 95. In 2001, with the support of the Aboriginal Healing Foundation, the Sagamok community committed itself to an intense period of reflection, learning & action designed to rebuild the health & prosperity of the Nation.
  96. 96. The Community Story Process: A systematic look in the mirror <ul><li>Children </li></ul><ul><li>Youth </li></ul><ul><li>Men </li></ul><ul><li>Women </li></ul><ul><li>Elders </li></ul><ul><li>Families </li></ul><ul><li>Political </li></ul><ul><li>Economic </li></ul><ul><li>Social </li></ul><ul><li>Cultural </li></ul><ul><li>Lands & </li></ul><ul><li>Resources </li></ul>
  97. 97. Sagamok Community Report Card <ul><li>Basic physical needs 7 /10 </li></ul><ul><li>Cultural integrity & identity 4 /10 </li></ul><ul><li>Unity & social support 5 /10 </li></ul><ul><li>Safety & security 3.5 /10 </li></ul><ul><li>Adequate infrastructure & social safety net 3.5 /10 </li></ul><ul><li>Adequate voice in decision making 4.5 /10 </li></ul><ul><li>Strong families & clans 3 /10 </li></ul>
  98. 98. Integrated Community Planning: Ten-Year Action Plan <ul><li>2 Strategic Lines of Action </li></ul><ul><li>Individual, family & community healing </li></ul><ul><li>Community </li></ul><ul><li>development </li></ul>Cross-Departmental Initiatives to address critical issues
  99. 99. Individual, Family & Community Healing Cultural Research Community Healing Movement Professional Healing Team Crisis Inter- vention Team Families Elders Children Youth Women Men
  100. 100. Community Development <ul><li>Strong engine for economic growth (Saulteaux Enterprises) </li></ul><ul><li>Comprehensive land & resource plan </li></ul><ul><li>Sagamok Community College </li></ul><ul><li>Social Welfare Reform Initiative </li></ul><ul><li>Culturally based governance system </li></ul><ul><li>Comprehensive housing strategy </li></ul><ul><li>Traditional healing lodge </li></ul><ul><li>Strong, culturally relevant education system </li></ul><ul><li>Strengthen voluntary sector </li></ul><ul><li>Alignment of all Band programs with 10-Year Action Plan </li></ul>
  101. 101. Ongoing Cross-Departmental Initiatives <ul><li>Early Childhood Development </li></ul><ul><li>& Family Engagement Project </li></ul><ul><li>Social Welfare Reform </li></ul><ul><li>Comprehensive Youth Development </li></ul><ul><li>Community Wellness </li></ul><ul><li>Community Economic Development </li></ul>
  102. 102. Cross-Departmental Initiatives E.g. Comprehensive Youth Development Strategy Spiritual & Cultural Needs Parents, Churches, Cultural leaders Safety & Protection Needs Anishnawbek Police, Parents, Youth Council Healing & Wellness Needs Health & Social Services, Youth Council Learning Needs Parents, Education Dep’t & Partners Social Support Needs Health & Social Service, Parents, Youth Council Recreation Needs Youth Council & Mentor Team Economic & Employm’t Needs Saulteaux, Educat’n, Health Social Services Leadership Development Needs Chief & Council,, Ed Dep’t, Youth Council . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Youth Population . Youth Council
  103. 103. Working from Principle
  104. 104. A principle is a statement of truth. It describes the nature of things as they are, what is basic or essential, what works and what doesn’t, what must be included, and what cannot be left out. What is a principle?
  105. 105. 16 Principles for Building a Sustainable World <ul><ul><ul><ul><li>Human beings can transform their world - The web of our relationships with others and the natural, which has given rise to the problems we face as a human family, can be changed. </li></ul></ul></ul></ul>1.
  106. 106. <ul><ul><ul><ul><li>Development comes from within - </li></ul></ul></ul></ul>2. The process of human and community development unfolds from within each person, relationship, family, organization, community or nation.
  107. 107. <ul><ul><ul><ul><li>Healing is a necessary part of development - Healing the past, closing up old wounds and learning healthy </li></ul></ul></ul></ul>3. habits of thought and action to replace dysfunctional thinking and disruptive patterns of human relations is a necessary part of the process of sustainable development .
  108. 108. <ul><ul><ul><ul><li>Justice - Every person (regardless of gender, race, age, culture, religion) must be </li></ul></ul></ul></ul>4. accorded equal opportunity to participate in the process of healing and development and to receive a fair share of the benefits.
  109. 109. <ul><ul><ul><ul><li>No vision, no development - A vision of who we can become, and what a sustainable world would be like, works as a powerful magnet, drawing us to our potential. </li></ul></ul></ul></ul>5.
  110. 110. <ul><ul><ul><ul><li>Authentic development is culturally based - Healing and Development must be rooted in the wisdom, knowledge and living process of the culture of the people. </li></ul></ul></ul></ul>6.
  111. 111. Interconnectedness - Everything is connected to everything else. Therefore, any aspect of our healing and development is related to all the others (personal, social, cultural, political, 7. economic, etc.). When we work on any one part, the whole circle is affected.
  112. 112. No unity, no development - Unity means oneness. Without unity, the common oneness that makes (seemly) separate human beings into “community” is impossible. Disunity is the primary disease of community . 8.
  113. 113. No participation, no development - Participation is the active engagement of the minds, hearts and energy of the people in the process of their own healing and development. 9.
  114. 114. The hurt of one is the hurt of all; the honour of one is the honour of all - The basic fact of our oneness as a human family means that development 10. for some at the expense of wellbeing for others is not acceptable or sustainable.
  115. 115. Spirit - Human beings are both material and spiritual in nature. It is therefore inconceivable that human community could become whole and 11. sustainable without bringing our lives into balance with the requirements of our spiritual nature.
  116. 116. Morals and Ethics - Sustainable human and community development requires a moral foundation. When morals 12. decline and basic ethical principles are violated, development stops.
  117. 117. Learning - Human beings are learning beings. We begin learning 13. while we are still in our mothers’ wombs, and unless something happens to close off our minds and paralyze our capacities, we keep learning throughout our entire lives. Learning is at the core of healing and development.
  118. 118. Sustainability - To sustain something means to enable it to continue for a long time. Authentic 14. development does not use up or undermine what it needs to keep on going.
  119. 119. Move to the positive - Solving the critical problems in our lives and communities is best approached by visualizing and moving into the positive alternative that we wish to create, and by building on the strengths we already have, rather than on giving away our energy fighting the negative. 15.
  120. 120. Be the change you want to see - The most powerful strategies for change 16. always involve positive role modeling and the creation of living examples of the solution we are proposing. By walking the path, we make the path visible.
  121. 121. Case Example: A Global Perspective - Reunion of the Condor and Eagle
  122. 122. Reunion of the Condor & Eagle This initiative illustrates the translation of principles into practical global program action.
  123. 123. Background: The Fourth Way Indigenous peoples’ historical response to oppression, colonization & trauma: <ul><li>Assimilation </li></ul><ul><li>Resignation </li></ul><ul><li>Confrontation and Resistance </li></ul><ul><li>Collaboration and Partnership </li></ul>
  124. 124. Origins of the Fourth Way: Guidance of spiritual elders and cultural leaders <ul><li>Seek harmonious development approaches </li></ul><ul><li>Build collaborative relationships between peoples </li></ul><ul><li>Build on cultural resources and strengths </li></ul><ul><li>Utilize spiritual principles to guide action </li></ul>
  125. 125. The Condor and the Eagle Initiative: A framework for implementing the Fourth Way <ul><li>Developed collaboratively by Indigenous leaders </li></ul><ul><li>An invitation to governments and development actors to collaborate with Indigenous Peoples </li></ul><ul><li>The implementation of guiding principles shared by Indigenous elders </li></ul>
  126. 126. Condor and Eagle Framework: Four Key Lines of Action 1. Prosperity development 2. Capacity building 3. Governance and civil society development 4. Building appropriate partnerships and networks
  127. 127. 1. Prosperity Development <ul><li>Microeconomic projects </li></ul><ul><li>Access to credit, capacity building and technical support, all focused on small business development </li></ul><ul><li>Medium to larger enterprise development </li></ul><ul><li>Access to capital, capacity building of business organizations, technical assistance for product development, marketing, legal and financial support </li></ul>
  128. 128. <ul><li>Human and community development </li></ul><ul><li>Healing from trauma </li></ul><ul><li>Business development </li></ul><ul><li>Governance, leadership & management </li></ul><ul><li>Cross-cultural collaboration </li></ul>2. Capacity Building
  129. 129. <ul><li>Building the capacity of local community organizations & institutions </li></ul><ul><li>Strengthening participatory mechanisms within culturally appropriate frameworks </li></ul><ul><li>Building regional collaborative organizations </li></ul><ul><li>Harmonizing public policy & legal processes with sustainable development requirements </li></ul>3. Governance and Civil Society Development
  130. 130. 4. Building Appropriate Partnerships & Networks: Connecting Indigenous organizations with viable partners <ul><li>Across the Indigenous world </li></ul><ul><li>With outside development actors who can </li></ul><ul><li>add value </li></ul>
  131. 131. Sustainable Vision, Values & Principles 4 Key Lines of Action Governance & Civil Society Development Capacity Building (Human & Community Development, Education & Training) Building Appropriate Partnerships & Networks Prosperity Development (Micro & Macro)
  132. 132. Condor and Eagle Framework: Required Processes 1. Listening & visioning 2. Participatory planning 3. Capacity building 4. Building systems & mechanisms for people-centered development
  133. 133. <ul><li>Listening & Visioning </li></ul><ul><li>Building relation- </li></ul><ul><li>ships between </li></ul><ul><li>partners </li></ul><ul><li>Recovering </li></ul><ul><li>cultural resources </li></ul><ul><li>Understanding local knowledge </li></ul><ul><li>Establishing a values foundation </li></ul><ul><li>Documenting the peoples’ story </li></ul><ul><li>Setting sustainable goals </li></ul>
  134. 134. <ul><li>Participatory Planning </li></ul><ul><li>Engaging the hearts & minds of Indigenous peoples in: </li></ul><ul><li>Mapping their real situation </li></ul><ul><li>Defining problems </li></ul><ul><li>Discovering solutions </li></ul><ul><li>Planning strategic action </li></ul>
  135. 135. <ul><li>Capacity Building </li></ul><ul><li>Both formal and non-formal training for </li></ul><ul><li>development leaders </li></ul><ul><li>Coaching and mentoring of leaders & </li></ul><ul><li>development institutions </li></ul><ul><li>E.g. Daybreak Star College in Seattle </li></ul>
  136. 136. <ul><li>Systems Building </li></ul>The nitty-gritty work of transforming the web of relationships & collective patterns of living so that the outcome is sustainable wellbeing & prosperity. <ul><li>Families </li></ul><ul><li>Communities </li></ul><ul><li>Organizations </li></ul><ul><li>Governance mechanisms </li></ul><ul><li>Livelihood practices </li></ul><ul><li>Social, economic, political and cultural relationships within & between communities, the wider world. </li></ul>
  137. 137. Sustainable Vision, Values & Principles Listening & Visioning System Building Capacity Building Participatory Planning Required Processes
  138. 138. Talking Circle Topic: How do the 3 key strategies for implementing sustainable development presented here (i.e.; systems thinking, transdiscip-linarity, working from principle) apply to your work? What did you learn from the case examples?
  139. 139. Module IV: Leading Sustainable Development
  140. 140. Characteristics of Leadership for Sustainable Development <ul><li>Values based </li></ul><ul><li>Principle centered </li></ul><ul><li>Collaborative </li></ul><ul><li>Transdisciplinary </li></ul><ul><li>Learning driven </li></ul>
  141. 141. Values Based A value is a relatively enduring pattern of thinking & action. Not all values are equal. Some lead to life. Others lead to death.
  142. 142. Leadership for sustainable development is driven by values that are life-preserving and life-enhancing. “ In every deliberation we must consider the impact of our decisions on the next seven generations. ” (From the Great Law of the Iroquois Confederacy)
  143. 143. Principle Centered A principle is a statement of truth. It describes the nature of things as they are, what is basic or essential, what works and what doesn’t, what must be included, and what cannot be left out.
  144. 144. The essential merit of…principle is that it not only presents a perspective which harmonizes with that which is immanent in human nature, it also induces an attitude, a dynamic, a will, an aspiration, which facilitate the discovery and implementation of practical measures. (“The Promise of World Peace”)
  145. 145. Principle-centered leadership organizes thinking & action according to fundamental principles. E.g. The principle of equity reminds us that d evelopment is not sustainable if the political decisions & economic activities of some groups of people continue to jeopardize the wellbeing of people belonging to other groups or living in other parts of the world.
  146. 146. Collaborative Collaborate: to work together, especially in a joint intellectual or artistic effort. (The Tormont Webster’s Illustrated Dictionary)
  147. 147. The challenge of sustainable develop-ment is like a puzzle. Different stakeholders hold different pieces and no one has the whole picture or even knows what the whole picture is.
  148. 148. Collaborative leadership for sustainable development creates a holding environment for joint work across lines (disciplines, cultures, power differentials, norms & values, economic & social interests, roles)
  149. 149. Transdisciplinary <ul><li>Both a process and a way of working </li></ul><ul><li>Transcends the boundaries of each contributing discipline </li></ul><ul><li>Generates new logical frameworks, methodologies, knowledge & insights from the synergy that is created between participants. </li></ul><ul><li>(Bopp 2001) </li></ul>
  150. 150. Transdisciplinary leadership <ul><li>Communicates a tangible passion for the work of finding sustainable solutions </li></ul><ul><li>Has the capacity to facilitate collaborative consultative processes </li></ul><ul><li>Has the will & capacity to help work teams see problems with new eyes born of a fusion of disciplinary perspectives </li></ul>
  151. 151. <ul><li>Makes time and space and allocates resources for collaborative work </li></ul><ul><li>Effectively manages human relations challenges </li></ul>Transdisciplinary Leadership, cont’d
  152. 152. Learning driven Three kinds of problems: 1. Simple - following a recipe (e.g. baking a cake) Source: Westley, Zimmerman & Paton,“Getting to Maybe” Random House,2006
  153. 153. Three kinds of problems cont’d: 2. Complicated - e.g. sending a rocket ship to the moon 3. Complex - e.g. raising a child, ending AIDS in South Africa
  154. 154. Sustainable development has all three kinds of problems contained within it. Part of the work can be achieved through the application of simple and complex recipes. A great deal of the work, however, is complex. We will need to “make the path by walking it”.
  155. 155. <ul><li>Learning to read complex patterns & systems </li></ul><ul><li>Learning to stand still long enough to see what is around you (the context) </li></ul><ul><li>Learning to adjust thinking & behaviour as a result of reflection on experience </li></ul><ul><li>Learning new knowledge & skills related to emergent challenges </li></ul>Learning-driven leadership requires cultivating the discipline of reflective practice:
  156. 156. Action Reflection Learning Values & Principles Planning
  157. 157. Does Canada have the Potential to Lead Sustainable Development Thinking & Action in the world? Q :
  158. 158. Talking Circle Topic: What will you take away from this explor-ation of the characteristics required to lead sustainable development work? What are the opportunities & constraints you face in responding to this challenge?

×