Privacy, Permissions and the Evolution of Big Data
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Privacy, Permissions and the Evolution of Big Data

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In the a world with stronger privacy regulations, how can you get customer consent to access the data that drives your marketing and your business? Big Data has allowed business to tap the power of ...

In the a world with stronger privacy regulations, how can you get customer consent to access the data that drives your marketing and your business? Big Data has allowed business to tap the power of customer data, but increased public attention to privacy—and pressure for government regulation—means that organizations can't assume they’ll have unfettered access to consumer data.

This SXSW Interactive workshop, presented by Andrew Grenville, chief research officer at Vision Critical, and Tyler Douglas, chief marketing officer at Vision Critical, helped participants prepare to balance privacy concerns with the need for data.

This presentation:
- Shares fresh data on consumer attitudes towards privacy
- Explores successful models for obtaining consumer consent for data access
- Identifies ways to provide value to customers who share data

For more information about the session: http://bit.ly/sxswconsent
To learn more about the study behind this presentation, please see: http://www.visioncritical.com/communities-consent-white-paper

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  • These are big data’s Wild West days—so much data, so much freedom, prospectors panning for gold, staking a claim anywhere they want. <br /> People are striking it rich, mining promising seams and claiming new turf all over the place. <br />
  • But the wild west did not stay wild forever—the rule of law came to the land, jurisdictions were defined and rules were put in place. <br /> What if the same thing happens with Big Data? What kind of restrictions might come? And what would be the way forward? <br />
  • What might drive regulation about big data? Concerns about privacy and surveillance. <br />
  • We’ll look at how citizens of the US, UK and Canada feel about privacy of on-line information--drawing on a study we conducted late February and early March in collaboration with the Queen’s University Surveillance Centre. <br /> 1017 USA <br /> 1502 Canada <br /> 2040 UK <br /> Representative sample from our online communities <br />
  • “If you’re not paying for it; you’re the product.” <br /> The currency of the internet is the collecting and selling of information on what you do on line. But people in the US, UK and Canada don’t like it, even as they perhaps unwittingly play along. <br /> Eight in ten or more are opposed to companies whose service they are using (like Google) being able to: <br /> Scan the text of your email messages for information on your interests; <br /> Track the content of your internet searches; <br /> Share information on your website visits; <br /> Share information on the contents of your social media sites (such as Facebook, Twitter and Linked-in); <br /> Track your credit card purchases; <br /> Track your loyalty card purchases; <br /> Track your whereabouts using the GPS signal from your phone <br /> Opposition in higher in the UK and higher still in Canada <br />
  • Two thirds to seven in ten are opposed to police or government agencies being able to: <br /> Scan the text of your email messages for information on your interests; <br /> Track the content of your internet searches; <br /> Share information on your website visits; <br /> Share information on the contents of your social media sites (such as Facebook, Twitter and Linked-in); <br /> Track your credit card purchases; <br /> Track your loyalty card purchases; <br /> Track your whereabouts using the GPS signal from your phone <br /> Opposition is somewhat lower in Canada and the UK <br />
  • Not as much Snowden effect as we expected. <br />
  • “If you’re not paying for it; you’re the product.” <br /> The currency of the internet is the collecting and selling of information on what you do on line. But people in the US, UK and Canada don’t like it, even as they perhaps unwittingly play along. <br /> Eight in ten or more are opposed to companies whose service they are using (like Google) being able to share the contents of your social media, your websites, your internet searchers and the text of your emails. <br />
  • We have evidence that it could happen. We collaborated with Queen’s Surveillance center on a 2006 study in the US, UK, Canada, France, Spain, Hungary, Mexico, Brazil and China and found that knowledge, awareness, mistrust and a sense of empowerment drives resistance. <br /> I am not saying big data will be greatly restricted, but what if it is? We owe it to ourselves, our employers and our customers to consider what we might do in this scenario. Or perhaps given the opposition, there is even an opportunity here to do something positive. <br />   <br /> What might we do? Right now, we’re basically taking without asking. <br />
  • So we have a disconnect here. What people want and what is happening are at odds with each other. What if things changed? What is people started to agitate for changes to the regulations? <br />   <br /> What if the flow of big data was shut down to a trickle? What would we do? <br />
  • You might think that’s impossible, that it could never happen, that it’s too entrenched. <br /> But think about social changes like gay marriage, the legalization of marijuana and the over throw of regimes like the Ukraine. These were big changes that seemingly came out of nowhere or were thought to be impossible. <br />
  • If we are transparent about what we do, and create understanding, and give people real control, we can create grounds for trust. <br /> In other words, if we stop stealing from people and tell them how they can help us, they probably will. Our experience is that many, many people are quite willing to be partners—co-creators and collaborators—if we are straight up with them and enable them to make their voices heard. <br />
  • People are fundamentally social animals. In conditions of trust and mutual concern for one another, people flourish. Like many of you, I do survey research. We have people join our panels and participate all the time. Why do they do it? Can we offer them something and make this an exchange rather than us just taking? <br />
  • We asked them and found <br />   <br /> 89% agree “I feel like I am doing my part as a good consumer and citizen when I provide feedback” <br /> 87% agree “I feel like I am being a trusted advisor when I provide feedback to a company on their products” <br /> 95% agree “I enjoy learning about new things and products when I do surveys” <br /> 86% “I love it when I see the results of a survey I participated in” <br /> 86% “I feel like my opinion makes a difference” <br />
  • So how about this for a crazy idea: <br />   <br /> We ask people to be our partners and join a panel <br /> We ask for permission to gather their data (cookie collector, purchase behavior, etc.) <br /> We ask for their opinions and combine that with their secondary data—giving us stronger insights and the ability to connect the “why” to the “what” of big data <br /> We share some of what we learn back to them—show them they are trusted advisors that are making a difference <br />   <br /> But it is not such a crazy idea, some of our clients are already doing it—but for the benefits of linking their data to survey insights—not because of a change in regulations. <br />   <br /> Now, if there are regulations the limit the type of data available, this community of consent concept had limitations in that we are looking a sample, rather than the universe. <br />
  • S11. Which of the following benefits would make you feel it is worthwhile to give companies access to some of your online activities? <br /> S11. Which of the following benefits would make you feel it is worthwhile to give companies access to some of your online activities? <br />   <br /> Total <br /> CAN <br /> USA <br /> UK <br /> (B) <br /> (C) <br /> (D) <br />   <br />   <br />   <br />   <br /> BASE: All Respondents <br /> 4559 <br /> 1502 <br /> 1017 <br /> 2040 <br /> BASE: WEIGHTED <br /> 4559 <br /> 1502 <br /> 1017 <br /> 2040 <br /> To get special deals and discounts <br /> 2449 <br /> 831 <br /> 550 <br /> 1068 <br /> 54% <br /> 55% <br /> 54% <br /> 52% <br /> To find out about products or events that will interest me <br /> 1197 <br /> 415 <br /> 262 <br /> 520 <br /> 26% <br /> 28% <br /> 26% <br /> 25% <br /> To get more relevant content on the websites I visit <br /> 781 <br /> 260 <br /> 179 <br /> 342 <br /> 17% <br /> 17% <br /> 18% <br /> 17% <br /> To stay connected to my friends or colleagues on the websites I visit <br /> 511 <br /> 157 <br /> 130 <br /> 224 <br /> 11% <br /> 10% <br /> 13% <br /> 11% <br /> To help the companies I buy from make better products/services <br /> 1233 <br /> 451 <br /> 285 <br /> 497 <br /> 27% <br /> 30% <br /> 28% <br /> 24% <br />   <br /> D <br /> D <br />   <br /> To ensure the products I want are in stock when I go shopping <br /> 1101 <br /> 364 <br /> 213 <br /> 524 <br /> 24% <br /> 24% <br /> 21% <br /> 26% <br />   <br />   <br />   <br /> C <br /> To learn more about my own behavior patterns (diet, shopping, fitness) <br /> 423 <br /> 142 <br /> 90 <br /> 191 <br /> 9% <br /> 9% <br /> 9% <br /> 9% <br /> To receive money for access to my information <br /> 1640 <br /> 479 <br /> 373 <br /> 788 <br /> 36% <br /> 32% <br /> 37% <br /> 39% <br />   <br />   <br /> B <br /> B <br /> To show me ads that are more relevant to me <br /> 645 <br /> 216 <br /> 189 <br /> 240 <br /> 14% <br /> 14% <br /> 19% <br /> 12% <br />   <br /> D <br /> BD <br />   <br /> S11. Which of the following benefits would make you feel it is worthwhile to give companies access to some of your online activities? <br />

Privacy, Permissions and the Evolution of Big Data Privacy, Permissions and the Evolution of Big Data Presentation Transcript

  • Privacy, Permissions and the Evolution of Big Data SXSW Interactive Workshop March 9, 2014
  • Agenda • Privacy and permissions: Where do you stand? • The public’s perceptions of privacy and their online data: survey results from the US, UK and Canada • Communities of Consent: a possible future • Small groups: ideas for creating transparency, value and community • What do we want to know now? Co-creating the next study
  • Where do you stand?
  • Where do you stand? 1. Are you using peoples data or protecting people’s data? What do you do? 2. Industry self-regulation or government regulation? 3. Are people ignorant of how their information is used or are they willingly giving up their information?
  • Big Data’s Wild West Days
  • Enter the Law
  • What Might Drive Regulation?
  • Surveillance Studies Centre
  • Companies and your online information 80 % opposed to companies scanning the text of email messages for information on your interests
  • Attitudes Towards Police & Intelligence Agencies 71 % opposed to police or intelligence agencies scanning the text of your email messages for information on your interests
  • Not much of a Snowden effect To police or intelligence agencies scanning the text of your email messages for information on your interests
  • Trust is Lacking How much trust do you have in companies/police and intelligence agencies to make appropriate use of your personal information generated by your online activities? Trust a great deal Trust completely
  • People don’t understand what happens with their online information……and they feel they can control it even less To what extent do you feel you understand/can control what happens to your information when you go on the internet? A great deal Completely
  • How do we solve this equation? _________________ Lack of Control Volatile Opposition Lack of Understanding + Lack of Trust =
  • Drivers of Resistance Awareness of Monitoring Knowledge of Monitoring Sense of Control Over Monitoring Trust In Monitors From: Surveillance, Privacy and the Globalization of Personal Information
  • What if…
  • “Impossible” Change
  • “We [Intel] think that people’s data—yours, mine, ours—are too highly concentrated in too few hands. People should be able to help create data, circulate it with reasonable controls, and then derive value directly from their own data. We are trying to understand what it would take to actually catalyze this type of personal data economy.” Dr. Tony Salvador, Intel Labs
  • How do we solve this equation? _________________ Lack of Control Volatile Opposition Lack of Understanding + Lack of Trust =
  • How do we solve this equation? Transparency + Control x Trust Community of Consent =
  • Communities of Consent
  • Value Exchange
  • Communities of Consent
  • How can we… Topic A Create greater transparency & trust? Topic B Create value and build community?
  • What’s a worthwhile benefit?
  • How can we… Topic A Create greater transparency & trust? Topic B Create value and build community?
  • In the report back… We want to hear: •What your brilliant ideas are •What is needed to make them happen
  • What are the open questions? What do you want to better understand about how citizens and consumers think about online privacy? Work with your group to define objectives and, time permitting, specific questions. We’ll conduct the survey and share the results back with you