The 2011-2014 higher education landscape: Seismic shifts, challenges, and pressures

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Workshop delivered to Athabasca University's Faculty of Health Disciplines (Edmonton, Feb 2014). Focuses on online learning strategies, emerging technologies, the current status of higher education and online online education, open scholarship, social media, and what the future of higher education may hold. Part 2: The 2011-2014 higher education landscape: Seismic shifts, challenges, and pressures

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The 2011-2014 higher education landscape: Seismic shifts, challenges, and pressures

  1. 1. The 2011-2014 higher education landscape: Seismic shifts, challenges, and pressures George Veletsianos, PhD Canada Research Chair Associate Professor School of Education and Technology Athabasca University, Faculty of Health Disciplines, Edmonton, Feb 2014
  2. 2. What are your hopes for the future of higher education? What are your concerns?
  3. 3. The Horizon Report Trends
  4. 4. The Horizon Report Trends Via Ruben Puentedura as quoted by http://bit.ly/Ma8YrX
  5. 5. Contemporary universities are facing numerous powerful forces that may shape their future.
  6. 6. a worldwide economic downturn globalization and competition purpose of education - Employment? Rebirth of edtech impact of emerging technologies changing demographics pressures for accountability curtailment of public funding (Morrison, 2003; Schwier, 2012; Siemens & Matheos, 2010; Spanier, 2010).
  7. 7. a worldwide economic downturn globalization and competition purpose of education - Employment? Rebirth of edtech impact of emerging technologies An increasing desire by faculty members, educators, & designers to “do better” to “do more” changing demographics pressures for accountability curtailment of public funding (Morrison, 2003; Schwier, 2012; Siemens & Matheos, 2010; Spanier, 2010).
  8. 8. Emerging Technologies •  May or may not be new technologies •  Evolving, “coming into being” •  Go through “hype cycles” •  Not yet fully understood •  Not yet fully researched •  Potentially disruptive (but potential is unfulfilled) (Veletsianos, 2010)
  9. 9. Higher Education in 2011-2014: Sense of urgency. And tension. The case of FutureLearn
  10. 10. Techno-enthusiasm & technodeterminism* dominate e.g., Technology will ____________ Narratives of disruption & revolution (*skeptics are not the same as naysayers)
  11. 11. At times, it feels like déjà vu with a dose of more of the same…
  12. 12. “Motion picture is destined to revolutionize our education system …in a few years it will supplant largely, if not entirely, the use of textbooks” “Education over the Internet is going to be so big it is going to make e-mail usage look like a rounding error”
  13. 13. “Strong  pressures  to  produce  mediocre   instruc1onal  products  based  on  templates   and  preexis,ng  content.”   Wilson,  Parrish,  &  Veletsianos,  2008    
  14. 14. “Examples  of     outstanding  [online]  instruc1on     are  hard  to  find.”   Wilson, Parrish, & Veletsianos, 2008
  15. 15. Disaggregation & Unbundling
  16. 16. “Whether the practice is called outsourcing, contracting out, or privatizing, the impact is the same. Food services, health care, the bookstore…endless array of activities that universities used to manage…” Kirp,  .L  (2003).  Shakespeare,  Einstein,  and  the  Bo3om  Line:  The  Marke9ng  of  Higher  Educa9on.   Cambridge,  MA:  Harvard  University  Press    
  17. 17. “Online program management services”
  18. 18. But where does it stop? Are there institutional core functions that should be safeguarded?
  19. 19. But where does it stop? Are there institutional core functions that should be safeguarded?
  20. 20. The role of the faculty member The roles of instructional designers, tutors, instructors
  21. 21. Course assistants Teaching assistants Academic Advisor, Mentor, Coach Instructor/Instructional Technologist Professor/Instructional Designer “academic freedom, shared governance, a livable wage, greater job security for non-tenure-track faculty teaching and scholarship cannot be fully unbundled…”
  22. 22. Efficiency. Automation. And robots.
  23. 23. Data Analytics. Big Data. The “new science of learning” “Adaptive, personalized, granular learning”
  24. 24. Open Practices Open Education  Open Scholarship
  25. 25. Open Sharing
  26. 26. In closing Myth: Classrooms are the same today as they were hundreds of years ago. The reality: Educational institutions are always evolving and reflect the societies which house them. What does our society look like? That’s what our institutions will look like.

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