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Respondent Engagement: Why do they respond anyway?

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  • 1. May 10, 2012Respondent Engagement:Why do they respond anyway?Or ‘It’s not all ‘bout the Benjamins”
  • 2. Panelists can be painfulPanelists are expensive to recruit, difficult to retain and,sometimes, a royal painBut they are also are the soil and water of ourresearchWithout them, we can do nothing 2
  • 3. Why do they do it?It is important for us to understand why they choose torespond (or not) and why they choose to stay in or dropout of our panelsIn this talk we will:• Look at what the literature tells about why people respond to surveys• Review some fresh data, collected specifically for this meeting, on why people do or do not like to do surveys 3
  • 4. Why do they do it?What the Literature Tells Us
  • 5. Why do they do it? “Factors affecting response rates of the web survey: a systematic review” summarizes a great deal of the literature on this subject. The authors identify four steps, each of which have an important impact on survey completion 1. Survey Development 2. Survey Delivery Surveyorr Web Survey Surveyee 4. Survey Delivery 3. Survey CompletionFrom: Fan W, Yan Z, (2010) Factors affecting response rates of the web survey:a systematic review, Computers in Human Behavior, 26, 132-139. 5
  • 6. Why do they do it? Survey Development Survey Delivery Sampling methods Questionnaire content Delivery modes Questionnaire presentations Invitation design Pre-notifications and reminders Incentives Survey Completion Survey Return Society-related Respondent-related Survey software (conscientiousness, agreeable, Data safety openness to experience) Design-relatedFrom: Fan W, Yan Z, (2010) Factors affecting response rates of the web survey:a systematic review, Computers in Human Behavior, 26, 132-139. 6
  • 7. Why do they do it? Survey Development Survey Delivery Sampling methods Questionnaire content Delivery modes Questionnaire presentations Invitation design Pre-notifications and reminders Incentives Survey Completion Survey Return Society-related Respondent-related Survey software (conscientiousness, agreeable, Data safety openness to experience) Design-relatedFan W, Yan Z, (2010) Factors affecting response rates of the web survey: asystematic review, Computers in Human Behavior, 26, 132-139. 7
  • 8. The Benjamins have a small but real effect In “Incentives in Web Studies: Methodological Issues and a Review”, Göritz conducted a meta-analysis of the effectiveness of incentives She concluded “material incentives increase response and decrease drop-out” but “the combined effect of incentives on response and retention is still small” She also reminded readers that “using material incentives is only one option to influence data quality and quantity. We should not forget about other possibly response-enhancing techniques such as personalization, prenotification, deadlines, reminders, offering result summaries and altruistic appeal”Goritz, AS, (2006) Incentives in Web Surveys: Methodological Issues and aReview, International Journal of Internet Science, 1, 58-70. 8
  • 9. This meta-analysis reveals that adding incentives does make a difference to response rate, but it has a pretty modest effect Increase over baseline response rate without incentives 50 45% increase in response rate 40 35 30 25 20 15 10 5 0 5 10 15 20 25 30 35 40 45 50 55 60 65 70 75 80 85 90 95 Baseline response rate without incentives Goritz, AS, (2006) Incentives in Web Surveys: Methodological Issues and a Review, International Journal of Internet Science, 1, 58-70. 9
  • 10. We did some of our own testing on the effects ofincentives on our panelists and, as a result, wereduced the incentives paid on our panels The response rate at $.50 vs. $1 across 153 omnis in Canada, the US and UK 100% 90% The response rate at $.50 vs. $1 across 153 omnis in Canada, the US and UK 80% 70% 60% 50% 40% 31% 30% 30% 20% 10% 0% Fifty cents Dollar 10
  • 11. We tested dropping direct incentives and moving to a sweepstakes and found lower response among young people, especially males 50 cents Draw 50 Response rate for 40 Canada 30 50 cents vs. draw 20 10 0 18-34 35-54 55+ US 50 cents Draw UK 50 cents Draw50 5040 4030 3020 2010 10 0 0 18-34 35-54 55+ 18-34 35-54 55+ 11
  • 12. Why do they do it?What Panelists Tells Us
  • 13. Survey of Springboard America PanelistsWe conducted a survey of 1006 members ofSpringboard America, our US panel, on April 12, 2012We looked at attitudes toward completing surveysand incentives, feedback, community mindedness,curiosity and being valuedWe found that intrinsic motivations are moreimportant than extrinsic ones—highlighting thevalue and importance of respondent engagement 13
  • 14. Respondents do surveys because they arecurious “I enjoy learning about new things and products when I do surveys” 95 % agree 14
  • 15. Respondents want to be good citizens “I feel like I am doing my part as a good consumer and citizen when I provide feedback” 89 % agree 15
  • 16. Respondents want to help and be respected “I feel like I am being a trusted advisor when I provide feedback to a company on their products” 87 % agree 16
  • 17. Respondents want feedback “I love it when I see the results of a survey I participated in” 86 % agree 17
  • 18. Personalizing winners of sweepstakes, whenpossible, is important “I often wonder if anyone ever really wins when a survey offers a sweepstakes for participating” 86 % agree 18
  • 19. This doubt underscores the need for and valueof providing constant feedback to panelists “I sometimes wonder if anyone ever really even sees and uses the feedback I provide through a survey” 62 % agree 19
  • 20. Money does it for a few “I am too busy to take surveys unless I am paid” 36 % agree 20
  • 21. Money does it for a few—especially youngerrespondents “I am too busy to take surveys unless I am paid” 100 90 % agree 80 70 60 51 50 40 36 32 30 20 10 0 18-34 35-54 55+ 21
  • 22. In the end, respondents just want to contribute “I feel like my opinion makes a difference” 86 % agree 22
  • 23. Conclusions
  • 24. Why they respond The literature and our survey confirm the importance of engaging panelists. They feel good about the feedback they provide. But they want you to tell them that, and share back some of your learnings—which tangibly demonstrates that you value their input 24
  • 25. We’ve proven the value of these best practices Test “new” ideas, offers, anything novel with respondents—they value it Provide feedback from surveys, they love it and it reassures them that you are listening Show a picture of sweepstakes winner “Bob S of Shawinigan”—it is another piece of feedback Tell them they are trusted advisors and show them how they make a difference 25
  • 26. Thank you

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