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Blended Learning, Day 2, Riyadh
 

Blended Learning, Day 2, Riyadh

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Presentations, Day 1, by Tanya Joosten and Amy Mangrich on Blended Learning for the 1st Annual eLearning Conference in Riyadh, Saudi Arabia. Topics include backwards design, developing a learning ...

Presentations, Day 1, by Tanya Joosten and Amy Mangrich on Blended Learning for the 1st Annual eLearning Conference in Riyadh, Saudi Arabia. Topics include backwards design, developing a learning module, managing your workload, managing student's expectations, evaluation, small groups, and more. Course demonstrations included as well.

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Blended Learning, Day 2, Riyadh Blended Learning, Day 2, Riyadh Presentation Transcript

  • Welcome to “Getting Started with Blended Learning” Tanya Joosten (tjoosten@uwm.edu) Amy Mangrich (amangric@uwm.edu) University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee Milwaukee, WI USA
  • Backwards design approach: Designing a learning module Learning Technology Center University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee eLi 2009 Riyadh: March 14-15, 2009
  • Choosing a model for blended course redesign
    • Classic works on “backwards design”
      • Understanding by Design, Wiggins & McTighe 2005
      • Effective Grading , Walvoordt & Anderson 1998
    • Advantages of backwards design
      • Practice-oriented instead of abstract theory
      • Intuitive for most faculty
      • Learning objectives linked to empirically verifiable outcomes
  •  
  • Backwards design process
    • What do I want my students to be able to do (i.e., not just “know”) at the end of the course?
    • What evidence or documentation do I require to demonstrate my students’ learning?
    • What learning activities will produce this evidence or documentation?
  •  
  • Example 1: Video Analysis
    • Identify Desired Results:
    • Ability to analyze and critique decision making processes
    • Acceptable Evidence:
    • Accurate written application of theory from the content given a decision making situation in determining what was effective and what was ineffective in the decision making process.
    • Learning Experience:
    • Students view video clips from Apollo 13
    • Students post analysis that integrates concepts from reading and lecture
      • Activity Evaluation
        • Students and I reflect on the analyses
        • Students receive grade for work
  • Apollo 13
  •  
  •  
  • Example 2: Ads in American Culture
    • So what do I want my students to be able to do ?
    • I want my students to apply standard forms of textual analysis to “decode” advertising, both print and audiovisual
    • I want my students to produce their own “thick” ethnographic data and analyze the data using a standard theoretical model of shopping
    • I want my students to extend the notion of “marketing” to areas that are not strictly commercial, e.g., science, religion, education
  • What evidence will I accept?
    • Use of standard textual-critical techniques such as asymmetry and substitution to identify “preferred” and “resistant” readings of ads
    • Use of “thick description” to delineate ethnographically relevant cognitive rules of shopping
    • Use of PowerPoint to use a multidimensional model to develop a shopping “mini-ethnography”
    • Use of the “marketing” metaphor to interpret students’ experience of religion, science, or education
  • Sample learning activities
    • Studying up exercise (asymmetry and substitution)
    • Shopping knowledge (“thick description”)
    • Shop until you drop (“mini-ethnography”)
    • Everything is a brand (extending the marketing idea)
  • Activity: Developing a learning module using backwards design
  • Desired Results
    • Learning Outcomes
    • What should students know, understand, and be able to do?
    • What is worthy of understanding?
    • What enduring understandings are desired?
  • Six Facets of Understanding
    • Explanation
    • Interpretation
    • Application
    • Perspective
    • Empathy
    • Self-Knowledge
  • Determine Acceptable Evidence
    • How will we know if students have achieved the desired results and met the standards?
    • What will we accept as evidence of student understanding and proficiency?
    • Course is not just content to be covered or a series of learning activities.
    • Document and validate that the desired learning has been achieved.
  • Continuum of Assessment Methods
  • Planning the Learning Experience
    • What enabling knowledge (facts, concepts, and principles) and skills (procedures) will students need to perform effectively and achieve desired results?
    • What activities will equip students with the needed knowledge and skills?
    • What will need to be taught and coached, and how should it best be taught, in light of performance goals?
    • What materials and resources are best suited to accomplish these goals?
  • List of Possible Activities
    • Comprehensions
    • Reading
    • Lecture Module
    • Expert guests
    • Simulations
    • Role-Playing
    • Case Study
    • Video Analysis
    • Research Modules
    • Brainstorming
    • Individual Presentations
    • Debating teams
    • Structure group projects (final research project)
    • Collaborative exams
    • Collaborative discussion
    • Student led discussions
    • Instructor-led group discussions
  • Staying organized and helping your students Learning Technology Center University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee eLi 2009 Riyadh: March 14-15, 2009
  • Why do students drop blended courses?
    • Workload is too great
    • Inadequate information and/or support from instructor
    • Problems with technology
  • Managing student expectations about your blended course
    • Blended courses involve at least as much work as traditional courses
    • Not all work can be completed at home
    • Identify well in advance assignments that require special access, course technologies, or effort
    • Start with low-stakes assignments and gradually increase rigor of work
  • Helping your students manage their time
    • Provide a longer timeline for the completing online assignments than traditional assignments
    • Break down longer assignments into smaller pieces, with assessment and feedback at each stage
    • Advise students to implement a set weekly schedule to do their work
  • Helping your students with technology issues
    • Make sure that students know what hardware/software is required as early as possible
    • Require an orientation assignment early in the semester to get students accustomed to the technology
    • Give students one-page handouts which guide them through specific tasks
    • Tell students how to get technology help
  • Tips for communicating with your students
    • Answer email and discussion postings on a schedule known to everyone
    • Communicate with your students in multiple ways; be redundant
    • Give your students an assignment calendar with clear due dates
    • Assignment instructions must be detailed and comprehensible; have them reviewed by peer
  • Tips for staying organized
    • Establish and maintain a good folder and file structure
    • Schedule time each week to do your course work
    • Use assessment tools to help keep up with your grading; rapid assessment and feedback is important for student success
  • Tips for an effective course website
    • Design consistent and easy navigation for your course website
    • Make sure that current course materials are visible and accessible within your website
    • Always check to make sure that course materials are available when they’re supposed to be
  • Tips for choosing course technologies
    • High tech is often high risk
    • Choose technology that you are comfortable using
    • Materials take more time to prepare than you think
    • Always check links and items that require special software or plug-ins
    • Check your course management site from the students’ view; use a lab workstation!
  • For more information:
    • Visit the Learning Technology Center’s blended/hybrid Web site resource page at: http://blended.uwm.edu
    • Or contact the UW-Milwaukee Learning Technology Center at LTC@uwm.edu
  • Group Activity: Developing a Learning Module Learning Technology Center University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee eLi 2009 Riyadh: March 14-15, 2009
  • Managing small group work to build peer networks Learning Technology Center University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee eLi 2009 Riyadh: March 14-15, 2009
  • Why use groups online?
    • Aids in building a learning community
    • Provides students with an opportunity to apply concepts and theories
    • Allows students use skills that are representative of real work life
  • Overview
    • Challenges to Online Group Work
    • Creating Groups: Issues to Consider
    • Designing Group Learning Activities
    • Assessing Student Performance
  • What are some challenges to group work?
  • Challenges to Online Group Work
    • Social Loafing
    • Transaction Costs
    • Nonverbal Cues
    • Accountability
  • Creating Groups: Issues to Consider
    • Group Size, Projects vs. Discussions
    • Group Diversity
    • Instructor or Student Driven
    • Team-building Activities
  • Sample Guidelines for Students: Getting Your Group Started
    • Create a group name
    • Appoint a leader and other roles
    • Develop procedure for changing leader or roles
    • Define group goals
    • Create communicate rules (How? How often? Where?)
    • Determine how members will evaluate work, participation, and contribution of teammates
    • Project assigned to the team will receive a grade that applies to every member of the group
    • Will anyone have final authority to modify team members grade up or down (e.g., leader)
  • Designing Group Learning Activities: Guide for Instructors
    • What aspects of the content lend themselves to group activities?
    • How does the assignment meet a course objective?
    • What are the goals of the group activities?
    • What communication technologies will be used?
    • Should roles be assigned?
    • What is the timetable for completion?
    • How will activities be structured to ensure participation by all members? How will accountability be built into the process?
    • What criteria will be used to assess the work? (e.g., rubric)
    • How will performance be graded (e.g., peer evaluation, group grade on product)?
  • Sample Group Learning Activities
    • Project Teams
    • Simulations
    • Case Studies
    • Role Plays
    • Research Teams
    • Video Analysis
    • Debates
  • Assessing Student Performance
    • Student Assessments
      • Peer Feedback Form
      • Peer Scoring Form
      • Personal Reflection
    • Instructor Assessments
      • Rubrics
  • Resources
    • Palloff, R.M. & Pratt, K. (1999). Building learning communities in cyberspace . San Francisco, CA: Jossey-Bass.
    • Michaelsen, L.K., Knight, A.B., & Fink, L. D. (2004.) Team-based learning: A transformative use of small group in college teaching . Sterling, VA: Stylus Publishing.
  • Using a blended approach for small group projects Example: Art in the Public Space Learning Technology Center University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee eLi 2009 Riyadh: March 14-15, 2009
  • Site and the Public Space
    • Upper-level undergraduate course
    • Student majors included Visual Art, Architecture, and Urban Planning
    • 15 students
    • 1/3 online
    • 2/3 face-to-face
  • Introduction to “Site and the Public Space”
  • Coursework for the semester & final project
  • Visual representation of final project structure
  • Ideation – off-campus activity
  • Ideation – online and in-class work
  • Final project “proposal” assignment overview
  • Proposal – in-class activity
  • Proposal – online work
  • Proposal – off-campus activity
  • Final project “research” assignment overview
  • Research – in-class activity
  • Research – online work
  • Proposal – off-campus activity
  • “ Production” for the final project
  • “ Installation” of the final project
  • “ Where Do You Live?”
  • Success through the blended course model
  • Lunch Learning Technology Center University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee eLi 2009 Riyadh: March 14-15, 2009
  • Group Activity: Developing a Group Activity Learning Technology Center University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee eLi 2009 Riyadh: March 14-15, 2009
  • Evaluating your course, before, during, and after: A blended course evaluation rubric Learning Technology Center University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee eLi 2009 Riyadh: March 14-15, 2009
  • What is the difference between assessment and evaluation?
    • Assessing Student Learning
      • Determining the value or quality of a student’s work
    • Evaluating Your Course
      • Determining the worth or effectiveness of a course design or teaching
  • Why is evaluation particularly important for blended courses?
    • Blended courses are different than face-to-face
    • Novices to the blended course structure
    • Demonstrates academic rigor in the blended environment
    • Progressive evaluation allows you to make changes throughout course life cycle – before, during and after the course
  • What tools can faculty use to evaluate their course?
    • Evaluation checklist
    • Evaluation can involve yourself, colleagues, or students
    • More tools for Evaluation
      • http://LTC.uwm.edu/resources.html
  • What do we want to evaluate?
    • Learner Support
    • Course Organization and Design
    • Instructional Design and Delivery
    • Integration of Face-to-Face and Online Activities (blended only)
    • Student Assessment
    • Student Feedback
  • Learner support
    • Not a significant issue in traditional face-to-face courses
    • Student self-assessment: is s/he likely to succeed as an online or blended learner?
    • Acquiring the technical skills and requisites
    • Knowing what to do when troubles arise
  • Course organization and design
    • A basic syllabus affords a contract between instructor and students
    • The use of modules to organize course activity is more pronounced in online and blended courses
    • The course Web site is a visual representation of the learning goals and activities
  • Instructional design and delivery
    • A relationship between learning objectives and learning activities
    • A progression towards critical thinking
    • Ongoing efforts to develop an online learning community of peers
  • Integration of face-to-face and online
    • If course redesign is not completely thought through, there is a tendency to favor the face-to-face over the online.
    • Running two modes of instruction parallel and independently is a sure recipe for the course-and-a-half syndrome
    • Each form of learning must affect -- extend, elaborate, intensify – the other
  • Student assessment
    • The online environment lends itself to frequent, low-stakes assessment with ample feedback
    • Traditional forms of assessment offer little information about the learning taking (or not taking) place
    • Rubrics help both instructor and student apply abstract knowledge to disciplinary practice
  • Student feedback
    • Like student assessment: frequent, low-stakes, and information-rich
    • The simple “reality check” is an extremely valuable tool
    • The students find their voices within the course
    • The community of learners benefits from a give and take between instructor and students
  • Conclusion
    • Why is evaluation integral to blended and online courses?
    • A variety of evaluation tools:
      • http://LTC.uwm.edu/resources.html
  • Individual Activity: Using the Evaluation Checklist Learning Technology Center University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee eLi 2009 Riyadh: March 14-15, 2009
  • Q&A Evaluation of Workshop Learning Technology Center University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee eLi 2009 Riyadh: March 14-15, 2009