Instructional Strategies for Blended Learning Handouts

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Handouts for Instructional Strategies for Blended Learning Pre-Conference session 2009

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Instructional Strategies for Blended Learning Handouts

  1. 1. The 15th Sloan­C International Conference on Online Learning  Pre­Conference Workshop:  Instructional Strategies for Blended  Learning  Wednesday, October 28, 2009 | 1:00 PM‐4:00 PM  This workshop will build upon the successful Blended Learning Workshop held annually in Chicago and sponsored by the  Sloan Consortium. The Sloan Consortium defines Blended Learning as involving courses which integrate online with face‐ to‐face instruction in a planned, pedagogically valuable manner (Niemiec & Otte, 2006). A brief overview will summarize  research on institutional issues and best practices from getting started in supporting college wide blended learning  efforts.   Drawing from the workshop in Chicago, we will discuss design frameworks for improving student engagement and  success. Frameworks used will include Community of Inquiry model (Garrison, Anderson & Archer, 2000), the National  Survey of Student Engagement (NSSE) (Kuh, G., 2001) and the best practices cases from the Sloan Consortium Special  Issue on Blended Learning (Picciano, 2009). The combination of these powerful frameworks will be tied to instructional  design strategies emphasizing teaching presence and Web 2.0 tools. Participants are urged to bring and share their own  ideas as we explore options for blending courses while improving their quality.  Presenters: Linda Futch, Assistant Director Instructional Design, University of Central Florida and Sue A. Bauer, Co‐Team  Lead Instructional Design, University of Central Florida  Timeframe  Activity Presenter 1:00 ‐ 1:20  Introductions  Karen Swan   • Review the highlights from the Blended Learning Workshop in Chicago  Karen Vignare   • Participant Introductions Activity ‐ Table Tent  20 min.  o Name, College, & Role (Front)  o Desired session outcomes (Back)  1:20‐ 1:50  Presentation  Linda Futch    Introductions/Agenda  Sue Bauer   UCF Overview of Blended Learning/IDL6543    Addie Model – Explain ADDIE    1. Analyze    • Definition    • Tools/Resources    o Teaching Styles Survey  o PSU ‐ Faculty Self Assessment for Teaching Online    o Course Assessment Form    o Systematic Design of Instruction    2. Design    • Definitions    • Tools/Resources    o Course Mapping    o Bloom’s Taxonomy    o Objective Driven Activities  • Blending w/Purpose     o Objectives/Activities/Assessment    • Web 2.0  (3rd Party Application Concerns)  30 min.  o Student/Faculty Support Plan    o Campus: FERPA, Copyright, Policies      University of Central Florida ‐ Center for Distributed Learning  ‐  10/28/2009   
  2. 2.   1:50 ‐ 2:30  Small Groups  Participants   Activity:     Discussion of Administrative Concerns:    1. Faculty ready to teach online    a. Teaching style    b. Technology skills    2. Support – both student and faculty    Analysis  1. Review Systematic Design of Instruction.    Design    1. Objective Driven Activities Worksheet (LMS/CMS, Web 2.0)    a. List 3 course objectives (Use Bloom’s Taxonomy as a    resource)    b. Describe activities to deliver objectives     c. Assessment Selection     2. Course Map    a. Develop course map of available tools (LMS/CMS)  40 min.    2:30 ‐ 3:00  Presentation   Linda Futch    Development  Sue Bauer   • Definition    • Tools/Resources     o Campus support    o Technology/CMS Support  o Course Completion Plan    Implement    • Definition    • Tools/Resources     o Instructor Blog/Reflective Journal    o Module “0”    o NSSE    Evaluate    • Definition    • Tools/Resources     o Student success/Student Perception Survey    o NSSE    o Self‐reflection    Repeat  • Modifications  30 min.     3:00 ‐ 3:45  Small Groups Activity:  Participants   Design (cont’d)    • Select Tools ‐ Course Map and Web 2.0 resources    Develop  45 min.  • Course Completion Plan  Implement  • Module 0  • (If time) Create Student Survey    3:45 ‐ 4:00    Linda Futch  15 min.  Conclusion/ Q & R  Sue Bauer   University of Central Florida ‐ Center for Distributed Learning  ‐  10/28/2009   
  3. 3. ADDIE Model   ADDIE is an acronym:     Analysis   Design   Development   Implementation   Evaluation     Following these five (5) basic steps will help you identify the most appropriate and effective learner-centered instructional strategies for any course setting:   Analysis Resources:  • Teaching Style Surveys (Variety of self assessments available online)  • http://www.longleaf.net/teachingstyle.html (Grasha ‐ Riechmann)  • http://www.texascollaborative.org/TSI.htm  • http://www.iats.com/publications/TSI.shtml  • http://www.members.shaw.ca/mdde615/tchstylsquiz7.htm  • Technology readiness:  Faculty Self Assessment for Teaching Online (PSU)  http://weblearning.psu.edu/news/faculty‐self‐assessment  • Course Assessment Form (Handout)  • Systematic Design of Instruction (Handout)  University of Central Florida ‐ Center for Distributed Learning  ‐  10/28/2009   
  4. 4. Design Resources:  • Course Map (Handout)  • Bloom’s Taxonomy (Handout)  • Objective Driven Activities Worksheet (Handout)  • Community of Inquire Framework (Handout)  • Web 2.0 Resources:  http://shex.org/wiki/Collaborative_learning_technologies  Development Resources  • Campus Support:  http://online.ucf.edu/distributed.php  • Technology/Tool Support  o Faculty:  http://teach.ucf.edu/  o Student:  http://learn.ucf.edu/  • Course Completion Plan (Handout)  • Submission Guidelines:  http://teach.ucf.edu/submission‐requirements  Implementation Resources  • Instructor Blog/Reflective Journal  • Module “0” (Handout)  • National Survey of Student Engagement  (NSSE):   http://nsse.iub.edu/NSSE_2008_Results/docs/withhold/NSSE2008_Results_revised_11‐14‐ 2008.pdf  • Beginning College Survey of Student Engagement 2009 (BCSSE):   http://bcsse.iub.edu/pdf/bcsse09.pdf  Evaluation Resources  • Student Feedback/Survey (Handout)  • Course Checklist  Contact Information  • Dr. Linda S. Futch:  lsfutch@mail.ucf,edu  • Sue Bauer:  sbauer@mail.ucf.edu    University of Central Florida ‐ Center for Distributed Learning  ‐  10/28/2009   
  5. 5. Course Assessment Form Instructional Preferences Instructional Strategies Instructional Media Interaction Additional Information Which instructional strategies do Which of the following do you Rate the level of interaction in your Please add any additional you use? use in the classroom? class for each category below. instructional preferences: Check all that apply. Check all that apply. 1 = Low (L) and 5 = High (H) Lecture Print materials (handouts) Socratic approach (Questioning) Whiteboard Student-content (L) 1 2 3 4 5 (H) In-class discussion groups Overhead transparencies Out-of-class study groups PowerPoint presentations Student-instructor Group projects Video (L) 1 2 3 4 5 (H) Student presentations Other – Specify: Role playing simulations Student – student Which of the following do you (L) 1 2 3 4 5 (H) Other – Specify: have your students use outside of the classroom? Technology in the Classroom Check all that apply. Internet access available? Assessment Textbooks Yes Which of the following assessment Web sites No methods do you use? Check all that apply. Video tapes Unknown Reflective writings CD-ROMs Quizzes Other – Specify: Multimedia presentation system available? Formal papers Yes Student projects/presentations Which of the following online strategies do you use to No Written mid-term examination enhance your course? Unknown Written final examination Class notes posted online Other – Specify: PowerPoint presentations posted online Assignment directions posted online Other – Specify: Center for Distributed Learning 1 University of Central Florida
  6. 6. Course Assessment Form Course Content What are the topical divisions (units, lessons, modules, etc.) Which of the following elements are covered in your syllabus? of the course? Check all that apply. Instructor contact information (Name, e-mail, phone, office location, hours and contact procedures) Course description (Name, number, section, credit hours, description) Course objectives Course prerequisites Required text(s) Supplemental texts Evaluation and grading methods Schedule of class meetings Schedule and location of midterm and final exam Communication protocols Expectations of students' performance Missed assignments/exams, make-ups, extra credit Center for Distributed Learning 2 University of Central Florida
  7. 7. Systematic Instructional Design Activity This activity is designed to help you begin thinking about your blended course. The questions are organized and colored according to each step of the ADDIE process. This activity (probably) will be a work in progress as you think about course. At the end of this activity, you will have a design document to help guide you through the development of your online course. Begin brainstorming: Answering the following questions to the best of your knowledge. If a question is not applicable, leave it blank and proceed to the next question. Your Name: Course Title: Catalog Prefix & Number: Analyze 1. What are your course goals? What do you want your students to walk away with when they leave your course? 2. What are your learner characteristics or your typical student? (Ex: undergraduate, graduate, age, traditional or non-traditional student) 3. What is the expected class enrollment size? a. 0-30 b. 31-60 c. 61-100 d. Over 100 4. How long is your term? a. Semester - ____ weeks b. Quarter - ____ weeks c. Short term - ____ weeks 5. Do you have any personal goals for your students? 1 Revised October 22, 2009 University of Central Florida – Center for Distributed Learning
  8. 8. 6. Are you thinking about using tools outside your course management system (such as a wiki and blog)? 7. What books, manipulative kits, CD-ROMs, DVDs, and software will be required? Design 1. What are the learner-centered course objectives? Based on Bloom's Taxonomy: • Remember/Understand (Basics students need to know) • Apply (Concept-related facts) • Analyze (Application of a rule or principle) • Create (Puts the parts together to form the whole) • Evaluate (Makes judgments about materials and methods) Based on Mager objectives: • What cognitive processes do you want your students to perform? • What psychomotor skills do you want students to perform? • What attitudes/values/feelings do you want your students to develop? 2. What kind of assessment will be used to determine whether the learning objectives have been met? 3. What are your ideas on how each learning module will be laid out? (Readings? Interaction? Activities? Assessment?) 2 Revised October 22, 2009 University of Central Florida – Center for Distributed Learning
  9. 9. Develop 1. What Materials will you use in the course (textbook, instructor notes, handouts, videos, newspapers, journals, publisher content, etc.)? 2. What will comprise your course components? a. Syllabus, Schedule, Protocols b. Instructor Introduction c. Content (modules, links to Web sites, glossary, images, audio, video, etc.) d. Assessment (quizzes, surveys, self tests, assignments, etc.) e. Interaction (mail, discussions, chat, instant messenger, calendar, etc.) 3. What activities/interaction will students complete? Will any require special instructions/tutorials? Implement 1. Will you have anyone else facilitating? How will these facilitators be trained (including student teaching assistants)? 2. Are there tasks your students need to complete in preparation for the course (orientation, survey, etc.)? 3. On what date will you begin delivering your course? 4. When will you confirm all online components are in place (e.g., your course completion deadline)? 5. When will you confirm all online components are functional (e.g., internal /course management system tools) and external links work (e.g., Internet), etc.? 6. Will any holidays interfere with the schedule, delivery, or due dates in your course? If so, which ones? 3 Revised October 22, 2009 University of Central Florida – Center for Distributed Learning
  10. 10. Evaluate 1. Will you utilize formative evaluations (survey to ensure content and instructional strategies are meeting your students' needs and learning characteristics)? Why or why not? 2. If you plan to use formative evaluations, when will you implement them (at the end of each module, midterm, final)? 3. Will you perform summative evaluations (measure effectiveness of your activities)? If so, how? 4 Revised October 22, 2009 University of Central Florida – Center for Distributed Learning
  11. 11. Course Map – Design Your Course Date: Delivery Modality: Blended Course Number: Course Name: Course Design Options Course Homepage   Student Orientation Syllabus Course Materials Course Maintenance • Start Here Overview/Syllabus Learning Modules Hidden from students o Instructor Introduction Schedule o Beginning Assignments Protocols • CMS Orientation o Technical Support/Service Desk o Campus Web Site for Online Learning Course Tools (CMS and Web 2.0) Organization Tools: Student Tools: Content Tools: Calendar My Files Learning Modules Search My Grades Local Content My Progress Media Library Communication Tools: Notes Web Links Announcements Chat/whiteboard Student Learning Activities: Discussions Assessments Mail Assignments Wikis Blogs Social Bookmarking Social Networking Social Media Sharing Mashups Synchronous Tools Virtual Worlds Video/Audio/Images RSS/Feed Web Conferencing University of Central Florida, Center for Distributed Learning 10/28/2009
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  13. 13. Objective Driven Activities Worksheet Objective(s) to Be Addressed: How Has This Objective Been Met In The Past? Lecture Group projects "Socratic approach" Student presentations (questioning of students) Role playing / simulations / games In-class discussion groups Guest speaker Out-of-class study groups Field trip(s) Other: Brainstorm Interactions/Activities/Assessment What part(s) of this objective can be met in the f2f component of your course? What part(s) of this objective can be met in the on-line component of your course? University of Central Florida – Center for Distributed Learning  10/28/2009
  14. 14. Which of the following specific instructional strategies and media can you use to meet the above objective? F2F Lecture "Socratic approach" (questioning of students) In-class discussion groups Out-of-class study groups Group projects Student presentations Role playing / simulations / games Guest speaker Field trip(s) Other: On-line Quizzes/Survey Quiz tool for submitting assignments Chat Discussion/Forum Guest expert "speakers" (forum / chat) E-mail Wiki/Blog On-line interactive activities / media Visuals (graphics, charts, animations, etc.) PowerPoint Supplementary content module(s) Links to web sites Web2.0: ___________________________________ Other: Action Steps Needed: University of Central Florida – Center for Distributed Learning  10/28/2009
  15. 15. Community of Inquiry Framework  4. PRINCIPLES, GUIDELINES & STRATEGIES (http://shex.org/wiki/Sloan_blended_learning_workshop) Principle Guidelines Strategies A: Design & Organization Social Presence Principle: Guidelines associated with this principle would be to establish Establish a climate that will create trust and opportunities to get to know other participants. A a community of inquiry major part of this is a comfort and willingness to • Social presence supports collaboratively engage with the community. An example of purposeful collaboration and an activity to establish a climate for collaboration would be to a questioning predisposition have each participant to introduce themselves and share something about their personal and professional interests and activities. A special forum should be created for these postings. Furthermore, students could be assigned to small groups to discuss formal expectations of the course and identify concerns. Group spokespersons could then share this in the main discussion forum. An opportunity to clarify and negotiate formal expectations of the course would be provided. It is also important to create a “chat” room for informal communication and allow students an opportunity to become familiar with each other. Being open to online office hours will also contribute to community formation. Cognitive Presence Principle: Guidelines associated with this principle would be to limit Establish opportunities for critical curriculum content such that a significant proportion of time reflection and discourse that will would be devoted to discourse and reflection. It is also crucial support systematic inquiry. to create opportunities for small group discussion. It is • The design of academic important in the very early stages of the course that an activities have a significant opportunity for substantive, curriculum focused, discourse be impact on how students provided. A brainstorming exercise may be appropriate in the approach learning early stage of the course. In order to set the stage for team- • Think in terms of inquiry and based collaborative projects down the road, it is suggested actively engaging students in that a small group discussion format be provided early to the process. allow students to engage more actively and with less anxiety. • Share with students the As groups report back, it is important that the teacher respond inquiry model – and model respectful discourse, establish a friendly metacognitive awareness. environment, and reinforce the posted guidelines for discourse (e.g., length of message).
  16. 16. Principle Guidelines Strategies B: Facilitation Social Presence Principle: Collaborative activities provide the best means to build and Sustain community by shifting maintain group cohesion. Group cohesion goes beyond polite from affective expression to dialogue. For this reason, the group or team should be the purposeful cohesive responses. focus of the discourse. The teacher should be present but not • The challenge here is to the centre of the discourse. Activities must be provided where maintain and enhance group participants must engage and rely on each other to accomplish cohesion (i.e., collaboration a relevant and important task or goal. Small group discussions and support). moderated by students may provide opportunities for students • Shift from overt socio- to connect with each other and collaboratively negotiate emotional messages to process issues. academic engagement. • Cohesion is an important enabler for collaborative activities. Cognitive Presence Principle: Guidelines associated with this principle are to provide Encourage and support the stimulating questions, keep discussion focused, identify issues progression of inquiry through to needing clarification, and be prepared to move discussion in a resolution timely manner. A good activity here is the use of a case study, • Facilitation is essential to debate or critiquing an article. Because case studies are based keep the discourse on track upon a real-life situation, students can readily relate to the and ensure that inquiry situation and are effective in involving all members of the evolves. group. In a collaborative learning environment it is important • Students do not move to that students respond to other student contributions and build resolution without a clear upon ideas offered by members of the community. It is goal and help in moving important that the teacher facilitate a threaded discourse as a toward specific outcomes in member of the community. It is also important that the an expeditious manner. facilitator model the inquiry process and emphasize the importance of moving toward some form of resolution.
  17. 17. Principle Guidelines Strategies C: Direct Instruction Social Presence Principle: Manage Guidelines associated with this principle are to be collaborative relationships to support supportive but expect students to be self-directed students to assume increasing responsibility and work collaboratively to complete tasks. From for their learning. a teaching presence perspective, there will be a • Direct instruction can increase stage in terms of group dynamics where tensions confidence and respect by managing and conflicts will arise. It is crucial that the teacher potential conflict and ensuring that directly address these situations and resolve students are collaborating constructively. conflicts. It may be a willingness to negotiate • Need strong leadership to achieve goals. expectations or correct a student who is out of line • Direct intervention is sometimes (e.g., excessive or flaming messages). Students necessary to maintain functional should also feel that they can question the teacher communities (manage conflict and and they will be treated respectfully. Team storming phase). building activities will give students the opportunity to develop the connection and support of the community to accomplish the assigned tasks. Cognitive Presence Principle: Ensure that Guidelines associated with this principle are to be discourse moves to resolution and prepared to contribute ideas and perspectives that metacognitive awareness results. will constructively shape the discourse. It is • The primary role for direct instruction is important to diagnose misconceptions so students to ensure that discourse and do not get side-tracked and frustrated. It may be collaboration achieve larger educational necessary to make connections among ideas, goals. integrate of ideas and summarize the discussion • At times direct intervention is required to before moving on. At this point, appropriate provide important information and activities are team projects. If expectations and ensure successful outcomes. guidelines are clear, team projects can provide • Raising metacognitive awareness is also opportunities to develop collaboration skills as an important responsibility requiring well as engage in a substantial realistic and applied more than facilitation. problem. Through collaboration, students must recognize the need for leadership, set goals, plan and manage tasks, assess progress, and adjust strategies where necessary. These activities ensure that students become self-directed and increase awareness of metacognitive processes.
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  19. 19.   Course Completion Plan Example for: BSK5932: Fundamentals of Basket Weaving To be taught: Fall 2010 Schedule 18 weeks from the Showcase until Fall classes start. I'm planning to have the first week be an orientation to online learning and the course content. The following twelve weeks will be dedicated to content modules, two weeks to a group project and a final exam activity during the last week. All totals 16 weeks. I will work on roughly one module per week to get all done on time. I will write my objective-assessment-rubric before I write my module content, and I'll look for places that graphics can be inserted to get the point across.   April  Date To Do 4/3 Take a break from working on this course 4/10 Contact bookstore: add Pegasus Disc to course materials and confirm textbooks. Schedule a time with Course Development to get my textbook covers scanned 4/17 Module 2 4/24 Module 3 May  Date To Do 5/1 Module 4 5/8 Module 5 5/15 Module 6 5/22 (Conference) 5/29 Module 7 June  Date To Do 6/5 Module 8 6/12 Module 9 6/19 Module 10 6/26 (Vacation) University of Central Florida, Center for Distributed Learning  10/28/2009   
  20. 20.   July  Date To Do 7/3 Module 11 7/10 Module 12 7/17 Look over online course materials and make appointment with Instructional Designer to take care of any changes. Learner Support Communication I will use the institutional e-mail program in my online course. In my Protocols, I have instructed my students to always type BSK5932 in the subject line of e-mail sent to me relating to the course. I have a folder set up for BSK5932 in my e-mail account, and I have also set up my account to file messages in this folder. It’s very important to me to keep up with how my students are processing the content of my course, so I require them to e-mail me an informal reflection page each week related to that week’s topic. I will be setting up folders in my e-mail account inside each assignment. My Protocols page tells students to type the name of the assignment in the subject line (after the course name). I plan to check e-mail account for this class every Monday morning. My Protocols page states that I only check e-mail once per week. They are instructed to post problems to the Technical Help discussion topic as their first line of defense. Technical Support Need : This is a graduate class and most of the students are not in the computer generation. In the past, computer-related assignments have resulted in a lot of complaining and frantic phone calls. Resource : I will require the students to complete the Learning Online Orientation (inside my course) before working on course content. It will be part of my introduction module in Week 1. Also, they must post their "favorite clean joke" to the Week 1 Discussion Topic in order for them to get used to logging-in. (A little slower start into the content is okay for me if it results in a smoother transition into the technology and a little community- building with the students.) Need : I'm concerned about the possibility of students losing work turned in to the Discussions or to the Quizzes. (I plan for them to do both.) University of Central Florida, Center for Distributed Learning  10/28/2009   
  21. 21.   Resource : On my Protocols, I have specified that students should always format everything in a word processor and then copy / paste. (This process gives them a back-up for their work so there's no excuse!) Faculty Support System UCF Library: I won't be needing any support from the UCF Library. Experienced Online Faculty Member: I will ask a faculty member who has taught online to be my mentor the first term I teach online. After a few terms of experience, I will volunteer to be a mentor. Instructional Designer: As I complete a module I will e-mail it to my instructional designer. I'm going to try to use my Saturdays to do this. Department Technical Assistance: I still need to contact the technology support personnel in my department. I will do this in July after the modules are completed. University of Central Florida, Center for Distributed Learning  10/28/2009   
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  23. 23.   Course Completion Plan Example for: BSK5932: Fundamentals of Basket Weaving To be taught: Fall 2010 Schedule I am designing a 12 week W summer course called Fundamentals of Basket Weaving. The modules below represent assignment units and topic areas. Each module will include a major writing task and peer response/collaboration work. Activity Description of Work Target Date Design Course • Design syllabus Oct. 20 • Develop protocols Oct. 25 • Plan graphics Oct. 30 Complete Module 1 • Identify objectives Nov. 10 • Design activities • Plan for assessment Present Module 1 • Share ideas and plans with my Nov. 17 instructional designer Complete Modules 2 • Identify objectives Dec. 10 and 3 • Design activities • Plan for assessment Update Progress • Meet with my instructional designer to Dec. 15 discuss progress thus far and guidelines for further work Complete Modules 4, • Identify objectives Jan. 15 5, and 6 • Design activities • Plan for assessment Complete Modules 7, • Identify objectives Feb. 15 8, and 9 • Design activities • Plan for assessment Complete Modules 10, • Identify objectives March 15 11, and 12 • Design activities University of Central Florida, Center for Distributed Learning  10/28/2009   
  24. 24.   • Plan for assessment Complete course plans • Complete last four modules March 15 Update Progress • Meet with my instructional designer to March 30 discuss progress thus far and guidelines for further work Check on logistical and • Enrollment April 1 technical concerns • Email accounts • Textbooks Complete non-web • CD complete April 15 course materials • Turned in to bookstore for sales Evaluate Site Test all materials. April 15 • Check links • Try quizzes • Assess appearance • Invite feedback from colleagues Begin teaching Brace myself! May 10ish Learner Support Communication I will use the institutional e-mail program in my online course. In my Protocols, I have instructed my students to always type BSK5932 in the subject line of e-mail sent to me relating to the course. I have a folder set up for BSK5932 in my e-mail account, and I have also set up my account to file messages in this folder. It’s very important to me to keep up with how my students are processing the content of my course, so I require them to e-mail me an informal reflection page each week related to that week’s topic. I will be setting up folders in my e-mail account inside each assignment. My Protocols page tells students to type the name of the assignment in the subject line (after the course name). I plan to check e-mail account for this class every Monday morning. My Protocols page states that I only check e-mail once per week. They are instructed to post problems to the Technical Help discussion topic as their first line of defense. University of Central Florida, Center for Distributed Learning  10/28/2009   
  25. 25.   Technical Support Need : This is a graduate class and most of the students are not in the computer generation. In the past, computer-related assignments have resulted in a lot of complaining and frantic phone calls. Resource : I will require the students to complete the Learning Online Orientation (inside my course) before working on course content. It will be part of my introduction module in Week 1. Also, they must post their "favorite clean joke" to the Week 1 Discussion Topic in order for them to get used to logging-in. (A little slower start into the content is okay for me if it results in a smoother transition into the technology and a little community- building with the students.) Need : I'm concerned about the possibility of students losing work turned in to the Discussions or to the Quizzes. (I plan for them to do both.) Resource : On my Protocols, I have specified that students should always format everything in a word processor and then copy / paste. (This process gives them a back-up for their work so there's no excuse!) Faculty Support System UCF Library: I won't be needing any support from the UCF Library. Experienced Online Faculty Member: I will ask a faculty member who has taught online to be my mentor the first term I teach online. After a few terms of experience, I will volunteer to be a mentor. Instructional Designer: As I complete a module I will e-mail it to my instructional designer. I'm going to try to use my Saturdays to do this. Department Technical Assistance: I still need to contact the technology support personnel in my department. I will do this in July after the modules are completed. University of Central Florida, Center for Distributed Learning  10/28/2009   
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  27. 27. Course Development & Web Services, IDL 6543 (Following is a sample Welcome or Module 0 Activity for your students.) Getting Started Learner Objectives The goal of this assignment is to ensure that you have the skills required for an online course. Specifically, are you able to: • create an e-mail with attachments? • search the Internet to find reliable sources? • navigate Webcourses@UCF to become familiar with the tools that will be used in this course? E-mail (You may want to change these instructions when using the e-mail tool inside the course) Send me a short e-mail message introducing yourself. In the subject line of the message, put "your course number-Introduction." Attach a word processing document including the following information: • Your Name • Home address • Home phone number • Office Phone number • What you expect to learn from this course eCommunity Access eCommunity and type in some biographical information that you would like your Web mates to know about you. If you wish to modify your biographical information, you may do so at any time. Next, review the biographies of your Web mates so you can get to know each other. Here are instructions to access e-Community: 1. Select the eCommunity link under Course Tools. 2. Login using your Network ID (NID). 3. A list of courses will appear if you have already logged into eCommunity before. Select the "Profile" button in the left panel. University of Central Florida Revised 3/12/2008
  28. 28. Course Development & Web Services, IDL 6543 4. Complete or update your information. Be sure to include your preferred e-mail address in the "E-mail Address" textbox. (Warning: Make sure you type your e-mail address correctly.) 5. Select the "Update" button at the bottom of the page to save your information. 6. Select the "Communities" button to return to the list of courses. 7. Select the Course Name to view your fellow students in each course. 8. Select each individual's name to view their individual biography. Discussion Posting – Online Learning Search 1. Using a search engine of your choice, find a Web site about online learning, online classes, Internet classes, etc. 2. Select the “Discussions” link in the Course Tools menu. In the "Online Learning” topic, post the URL or address of the online learning site you found from your Internet search. Provide an annotation of the Web site. Respond to at least one posting from another student. Practice Quiz There are online quizzes in this course. To get an idea of how they work, select the "Assessments" link under Course Tools. Try out "Practice Quiz #1". This quiz is very useful because it also helps you review what you have studied in this module. Help If you feel that you are not comfortable with completing any of these assignments or need technical help, post a message in the "Technical Help" discussion topic or e-mail a fellow student. If you have not received a response within 24-hours, e-mail or telephone your instructor. University of Central Florida Revised 3/12/2008
  29. 29.   EVALUATE  STUDENT SURVEYS  MULTIPLE CHOICE QUESTIONS TO ASK:  • The objectives/learning outcomes for each part of the course were clear.   • The required tests, quizzes, projects, papers, and reports accurately measured my attainment of these  learning outcomes.   • The course was well organized.   • The required reading and assignments contributed to my learning.   • The threaded discussion/course conference contributed to my learning.   • The instructor inspired interest in the course material.   • The instructor provided timely feedback. (The instructor's feedback was clear and useful.)   • The instructor was available and helpful.       • The instructor treated students with respect.   • The instructor provided opportunities for students to learn from each other.   • Overall I would rate the effectiveness of the instructor as?       • Overall I would rate the effectiveness of the course as?  (Please think about your participation in the class  and your online experience)  • On average how many hours a week did you spend on the course? (numeric values only)   • On average how many times a week did you log onto your course? (numeric values only)   • How many total courses (online and in a classroom) did you take this semester? (numeric values only)   OPEN ENDED QUESTIONS TO ASK:  • How did you learn about this course?  • What were the positive experiences in this class?  • What could be done to improve this course?  • Do you have any additional comments?  FACULTY REFLECTION:  • Did the Face‐2‐face and Online components work harmoniously?  • Were you pleased with the outcomes of assignments/activities/assessments?  OTHER RESOURCES:  ONLINE COURSE RUBRIC (EVALUATE YOURSELF)   • CHICO Evaluation Homepage: http://www.csuchico.edu/celt/roi/index.shtml  • Rubric: http://www.csuchico.edu/tlp/resources/rubric/rubric.pdf  University of Central Florida, Center for Distributed Learning  10/28/2009   

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