Reputation & Public Affairs: inseparable bedfellows?

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Presentation at European Public Affairs Action Day, March 2013.

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  • Government is your customer, needs value and societal outcomes
  • Reputation & Public Affairs: inseparable bedfellows?

    1. 1. Reputation &Public Affairs Inseparable bedfellows? March 2013 @ EPAD
    2. 2. “Now make me do it…”
    3. 3. Today1. Reputation drivers: the authenticity gap2. Your thoughts on reputation3. Reputation and Brussels4. Managing reputation
    4. 4. 2. Reputation drivers: the authenticity gap
    5. 5. A new discussion REPUTATION VISIBILITY EXPERIENCE BRAND What others sayWhat you sayand how you about you based behave on shared AUTHENTICITY EXPECTATIONS perceptions
    6. 6. How do your brand and reputation compare? What audiences are telling you they actually What you say experience… Marketing Customer service scores Press releases Employee survey results Executive speeches Stock performance Lobbying Social conversations REPUTATION BRAND VISIBILITY EXPERIENCE What others say What you say about you based and how you on shared behave AUTHENTICITY EXPECTATIONS perceptions What you do… What audiences expect… Operational performance: Your Reputation Outlook Quality standards Customer service CSR Employee relations
    7. 7. Alignment creates REPUTATION VISIBILITY EXPECTATIONS BRAND What others sayWhat you sayand how you about you based behave on shared AUTHENTICITY EXPERIENCE perceptions AUTHENTIC ENGAGEMENT
    8. 8. The DNA of Authenticity
    9. 9. Real life authenticity gapGermany: energy, pharmaceuticals, banking
    10. 10. 2. Your thoughts on reputation
    11. 11. Reputation drivers (in order of importance)
    12. 12. Reputation drivers to improve
    13. 13. Sectors with best reputation
    14. 14. 3. Reputation and Brussels
    15. 15. Does it really matter?
    16. 16. Technical dossiers
    17. 17. Does anyone really care?
    18. 18. vs.
    19. 19. In most cases, yes, it matters
    20. 20. "A new model of influence" Centralised powerFew political actorsTechnical arguments Rational Emotional Many political actors Value-based arguments Diffuse power Source: Simon Titley
    21. 21. Consumer brand & industry sector affect policy brand Source: BrandZ Top 100 Most Valuable Global Brands, Millward Brown, Ogilvy, WPP, 2011; National Journal Member Research, 2012.
    22. 22. Economic Affairs (ECON) committee:59% believe Financial Transaction Tax will make Europes banking sector less competitive worldwide 63% would support its introduction
    23. 23. But in Brussels, we seedifferent scenarios
    24. 24. 3 Brussels scenarios
    25. 25. 3 Brussels scenarios: focus points
    26. 26. 4. Managing reputation
    27. 27. If we’re scenario 2?
    28. 28. Full-scale reputation management Actively integrate all communications disciplines and centralize BUSINESS message management GOAL & POSITIONING Know your audiences and respond to unique needs Play “offence and defence” simultaneously; VISION MISSION anticipate and manage issues proactively VALUES Be active, aggressive and consistent Continuous measurement LEADERSHIP THEMES CORE CORPORATE MESSAGES ALIGNED MESSAGES ACROSS FUNCTIONS MARKETING CORPORATE HUMAN INVESTOR CORPORATE & BRAND COMMUNICATIONS RESOURCES RELATIONS RESPONSIBILITY STRATEGY INTEGRATED PROGRAMS TO EXECUTE STRATEGY
    29. 29. Multiple stakeholders INVESTORS EMPLOYEES CONSUMERS ACADEMIC LOCAL COMMUNITY YOU COMMUNITY GOVERNMENT NGOs MEDIA 35
    30. 30. Manage multi-connected reality INVESTORS EMPLOYEES CONSUMERS ACADEMIC LOCAL COMMUNITY YOU COMMUNITY GOVERNMENT NGOs MEDIA
    31. 31. Most of Brusselsfaces scenario 1
    32. 32. 10 principles
    33. 33. 1. From policy to politics 2. Investigate what resonates> POLICY route map Question to MEPs • Argument (refuting evidence) Chemicals are at the heart of innovation as they enable the • Facts (objectives) creation of new products and • Balance processes • Elites • Winning arguments> POLITICS journey • Prejudices (confirming evidence) • Feelings (subjectives) • Victory/defeat • Public … and yet • Changing outcomes Source: HLC Source: CEFIC survey of MEPs 2012
    34. 34. 3. Speak audience’s language 4. Narrative not “education”ENVI committee members’ Intelligence Intelligence gathering & gathering & degree courses: analysis analysis Intelligence Delivery “narrative” Delivery p.s. don’t “educate” simple & emotionally engaging
    35. 35. 5. People not messaging 6. Politicians ≠ judges It doesn’t matter who is “right” Source: HLC
    36. 36. 7. Integrity through support 8. Beyond communications Culture Structure Mindset
    37. 37. 9. Programmes and campaigns 10. Provide value and solutions proactive solutions driven participatory not a victim status-quo ≠ option practical
    38. 38. 10 ideas
    39. 39. 1. Data and smart polling 2. VisualiseWhat do people really think? Instrumental > expressive
    40. 40. 3. Argue price elasticity 4. Competitive message development Regulation won’t work unless… Scenarios: what will your opponent say?
    41. 41. 5. Long-tail supporters 6. Mobilise employees (or leaders..?) Don’t ignore small scale At times your most valuable supporters, aggregate them constituency?
    42. 42. 7. Obsessive rebuttals 8. Extreme targeting > Rebut every item published in Europe
    43. 43. 9. Harness existing online networks 10. Your Wikipedia pageKey stakeholders on LinkedIn? 78% of MEPs use it weekly
    44. 44. 10 reasonsfor inaction
    45. 45. 1. What if it all goes wrong? 6. We might upset politicians2. What if someone criticises us? 7. It is too complicated for3. We won’t know how to handle people to understand consequences 8. The press is biased4. It’s not our job 9. People might notice us5. Industry as a whole needs to 10. We don’t know what to do do it
    46. 46. Thanks

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