090827 Information Society Future Of And Digital Media Trends

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Slides from the presentation at Hyper island Stockholm for the Information Society module.

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  • Begin
  • Who is Petter? It is said that in the physical world only 7percent of what we communicate is verbal, 55 percent is the facial and body expressions while 38% is in the vocal cues. One’s identity is made up of the context you are in, the attributes you wear and what you chose to tell from your past.
  • Traditionally the foot prints we left behind where only in the records of the authorities, the people we touched and if successful, the palaces we built. Church register.
  • In a networked world where the media is social and the value is in the user generated data, where nothing can be assumed to be deleted, what is ones online identity? What is known about me? What is my digital footprint like?
  • Google Calendar can tell you about my availability and engagements.
  • Music service and community Last FM can tell you that I have listened a lot to MGMT and Paul Kalkbrenner lately. LastFM also knows that I have an iPhone since that is how I access the service the most.
  • Food home delivery company Ocado knows about my food habits and often helps me with non-intrusive reminders of things I might have forgot to buy or things that I might like. They are often very correct in there assumptions.
  • For years and years Amazon has built up a huge profile of what types of books I buy. (99% Digital media related)
  • My images taken with my iPhone and uploaded to Flickr has Geotags embedded in them. The iPhone has a built in GPS that the camera can talk with. The geotags allow Flickr to map the photo to the specific location it was taken.
  • Blinkx can extract the audio track in online videos and through voice recognition turn any spoken words into text that can be indexed and possible to search.
  • Few friends on Facebook. Says something about me as well
  • Since I work with the web there are lots of profiles of me on sites like Sugar Scape, a community for teenage girls, where data contributed by me eists, but since it was only contributed for test purposes it would skew my online profile quite a lot...
  • LinkeIn is the online social network I trust the most, find the most useful and therefore I have chosen to tell LinkedIn quite a lot about me like who I know or what I have done professionally in the past. LinkedIn also knows that I have a iPhone since I use it to connect a lot. Feel free to add me as a connection on LinkedIn: http://www.linkedin.com/in/petterw
  • In a networked world where the media is social and the value is in the user generated data, where nothing can be assumed to be deleted, what is ones online identity? What is known about me? What is my digital footprint like?
  • The changes we today can see digital having on people’s behaviours and the way we do business was predicted long time ago. The key is to get the timing right and know when something will start to spread more evenly. “ When we change the way we communicate, we change society” - Clay Shirkey, Here Comes Everybody What we see around us is a shift of what we percieve as value. All the silly stuff we hear about in the press about new laws and bad behaviours in connection to digital is just a symptom of the paradigm shift we are in.
  • What drives change? Technology traditionally is the enabler of change. It enables new ways of communicating, new business models, new social behaviours, and new social structures. History tells us that: written language, book printing, steam engine etc. Technology breakthroughs can often be envisaged. The ideas often exists before they are possible. Changes in social behaviours are much harder to predict though. Much harder to understand ourselves. More than ever are changes in social behaviours driving the development of new technologies. The human is being put first and the technology is made as transparent, invisible as possible.
  • YouTube was a major technology platform for both camps during the 2008 presidential campaigns. The Obama camp used it particularly well and was no longer dependnat on what the TV network channels choose to show in their coverage. An interesting point here is that the channel, i.e. YouTube did not exist in 2004 at the time of the previous election. Other interesting fact about the impact digital hand on the election: Obama’s campaign raised $600m in small online donations from three million people. Republican presidential candidate Johan McCain complaint that his Democrat rival had more money to spend on TV advertising than he had. Previously unheard of. Obama managed to mobilise large groups of people wherever he went even in places where he had no local office. Low cost operations with a massive return. Howard Dean used social websites in the 2004 presidential race. It was a community based on the Drupal plattform and MeetUp was used to organise volunteers. The Oreilly blog reads: “ Obama went further, used Twitter, SMS messages, news RSS feeds, army of bloggers, YouTube videos, tens of millions of flickr photos. All these channels worked to educate voters, raised awareness, coordinate a “get out the vote effort” that yielded the largest popular mandate of the last thirty years.” “ Obama used the net not just to raise money and generate excitement, but to use it as a tool for co-ordinating old-style action on the ground.” ” Obama’s website was a hub for activists and got some 1.5 million accounts.” “ Intermediate sized donors giving anywhere from $5 to the legal maximum of $2300 - made primarily through the Internet. $3 million dollar ad buy in the World Series two weeks before the election.” “ Everything of importance was recorded and broadcast via the net in its completeness bypassing the TV networks.” http://broadcast.oreilly.com/2008/11/president-obamas-technical-foc.html But it was not just how Obama and his campaign used the internet. The voters did as well: Blogs Since end of August: Obama – 500 million posts, McCain – 150 million posts (Don’t know whether posts were positive or negative) Twitter and MySpace Obama: 844,927 MySpace friends, McCain 219,404 MySpace friends Obama 118,107 Twitter followers, McCain 4942 Twitter followers (Says more about the candidate or the demographic of their voters?)
  • Obama by-passed the traditional media structures. Building on existing platforms it was easy to reach out. Obama had embraced important aspects of the Web 2.0 idea. Web 2.0 is a trend: Read/Write, two-way, anyone can be a publisher Social web Defines an era just like Dot Com Search (Google, Yahoo, Ask etc.) Social Networks (MySpace, Facebook, OpenSocial) Online Media (YouTube, Last.fm) Content Aggregation / Syndication (Bloglines, Google Reader, Techmeme, Topix) Mashups (Google Maps, Flickr, YouTube) The concept was introduced by Tim O'Reilly, at the Media Web 2.0 conference in 2004 Tim himself gives a Rather technical definition saying that Web2.0 is about the network as a platform where users add value. http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=CQibri7gpLM
  • web 1.0 Like the Offline world. For example you have a product, you open a store and use traditional marketing to drive traffic to your store. A point has been reached where the concept of doing it the offline way online is almost perfected. Web 2.0 The ideas has been around long enough for it to move from being an online advantage to a necessity. If you do not do it the web 2.0 way you will struggle to succeed. The tools to develop has become cheaper and far more accessible. You can get “more bang for your bucks”
  • Tim Oreily defines Web 2.0 He describes technology as the driver http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=CQibri7gpLM
  • Now it is all about conversation and “social” It has been called the conversation economy. What does that mean, what’s is the future waiting to be evenly distributed? And the conversation happens online all over the place in a range of channels through even wider selection of tools. Personal Social networks White label social networks Blogs Photos Videos Audio Microblogs SMS Emails Collaborative tools Wikis Events Recommendations The conversation is just the social media aspect of digital. Digital media enables so much more. The conversations might be a driving force but we have more needs than just engaging in conversations. There are lots and lots of digital channels and tools to be aware of and use as they seem fit.
  • We are getting faster internet connections and becoming more mobile. “ Global mobile modem from 5MM in 2006 to 68MM+ in 2008” Source: ComScore Always connected. Lots of devices that gives us different windows into one big machine, the cloud. Changes the social behaviours for when and where we use the web Changes the requirements on online services and applications New opportunities. We become dependant on the cloud, our profiles in the cloud. Already today we no longer need to remember phone numbers if we always have our mobiles with us. The benefits of being transparent, sharing what you do, who you are etc. will outweigh the need of what we today define as privacy Everything you do will be possible to do in the cloud, including living in virtual worlds with virtual identities, Second life etc. The ways we connect with the cloud it will just get smarter and less dependant on power and connectivity.
  • Mobile technology changes the social behaviours for when and where we use the web. Changes the requirements on devices, online services and applications. New opportunities.
  • Challenges existing perceptions of how we interact. What our identities are made up of.
  • Access to information, access to technology and access to the world educates, unites and mobilises people.
  • With all this twittering noise going on.... What is one to do? The problem: To much information. Information overload has become the default state. It will only get worse. Deal with it.
  • We currently have a few filters to help us deal with the information: Search tools. Clever interfaces that can slice, dice and structure the information for us. Social media: Trust recommendations from others. Tools will get smarter: Find relevance and natural relations in the unstructured data, semantic web. Personalised – based on the individuals past behaviour Social – past behaviour of similar users Item – similar to current item (Examples: Amazon, Netflix, Last.fm, Pandora, StumbleUpon, Strands) Tools like Twitter
  • The ‘web’ is moving from being ‘destination’ driven and ‘page’ centric to a ‘flow’ of information. Finding RELEVANCE requires help – from friends, tools, brands: “Findability” The “Long tail” model can be used to illustrate how news can be created in niche channels and then, if relevant enugh, work it’s way up the media channels until it reaches the mainstream. It is all a filter. Decide at which point you want to tap in to get the granularity of information you want. Youth today consume far more news than earlier generations. Difference is that it is peer reviewed. They do not go to the traditional media sources for news but to their friends through viral and portals like Digg.
  • To understand what is happening I like to look back to a manifesto published in 1999 The ideas of how the web will change markets and social behaviours have been around. Nobody was just sure exactly how it would happen or how soon. To look forward look backwards In 1999 three digital thought leaders, Chris Locke, Doc Searls, David Weinberger published the Cluetrain manifesto. It stated that “ markets are conversations ”, that “ markets consist of human beings, not demographic sectors ” and from there they described what is today’s reality for any business. Thousands of people signed up to it. They started a conversation....
  • Content creators in our everyday life. Sharing the experience becomes an important part of doing it.
  • … because identity is a function of sharing.
  • The more you share the more you define your identity and you build trust. Guy Stephens works for Carphone Warehouse as their customer support and digital media advocate on Twitter. He shares news and his insights into social media especially things related to mobiles as well as offering help and support to people who twitter about Carphone Warehouse.
  • In an attention economy, you don’t jut buy attention, you earn it – at the cost of other things.
  • In an attention economy, you don’t jut buy attention, you earn it – at the cost of other things.
  • And how do you store the value of your reputation? In your profile. Your universal profile will be tiered and you decide who can see and have access to which part of your profile. The profile holds my identity. You will manage where the data is to be stored. Who do you trust enough to store your profile? Will they be the new banks?
  • People spend more and more time in Virtual Worlds. Some worlds are game based while other are virtual social alternatives to the physical world. “ Physical” living in the cloud. The trend seems to be that the borders between virtual worlds and the physical reality are becoming more and more blurred. Virtual goods are given a value.
  • We want to be individuals. Digital allows for individualisation and personalisation. Personalize avatars, profiles, web sites, products etc.
  • Brands will: Offer ways to extend my profile. Provide me with the tools I did not even knew I needed. Be a brand that reflects a personalised me. Virtual goods, features, abilities (exists already in virtual worlds and games).
  • Data portability started as a solution to the pain of signing up to all those sites and networks, adding your profile over and over again. Data portability aims to enable me to sign in everywhere with one password and only share media once in one place. Single sign-on “ OpenID is a shared identity service, which allows Internet users to log on to many different web sites using a single digital identity , single sign-on , eliminating the need for a different user name and password for each site. OpenID is a decentralized, free and open standard that lets users control the amount of personal information they provide.” “ OpenID is increasingly gaining adoption among large sites, with organizations like AOL , BBC , Google , IBM , Microsoft , MySpace , Orange , VeriSign , Yandex and Yahoo! acting as providers. In addition, OpenID can be used with Windows CardSpace ” – Wikipedia The downside is if someone manages to get that one password of yours and get access to your complete online identity. OpenSocial from Google, similar to Facebook Connect “ Create widgets with one set of tools.” Provides one API for building social applications that can be used across different websites. An open alternative to Facebook’s application platform. There are many websites implementing OpenSocial, including Engage.com, Friendster, hi5, Hyves, imeem, LinkedIn, MySpace, Ning, Oracle, orkut, Plaxo, Salesforce.com, Six Apart, Tianji, Viadeo, and XING.
  • Photoshop tutorials became a Plantimals competition became content for the Daily Mail. People constantly learn, create, test and share. The best creations bubble up to the mainstream. http://www.worth1000.com/contest.asp?contest_id=6264
  • Sharing of know how enables more people to create what they want themselves. A DJ Jacket built by Hyper Island students http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=NUANPboq4pE
  • Tim O’reilly saw the future in people hacking things. Digital going outside of the screens. Make is a magazine, website network and a conference where people meet to share tips and tricks around physical computing .
  • Learning, creating, testing and sharing is what it is about. The process is the experience.
  • Sharing + Profile + Beta culture
  • Sharing + Profile + Beta culture
  • Sharing + Profile + Beta culture
  • Intelligent Web = data is getting smarter Semantic web, machines talking to machines making sense out of the information Current tools API = When sites provide a way for others to access and use it’s features and information in a structured way. Gives access to advanced technology and content at a small cost. Reuters developed “Calais” a tool that recognises People, Companies, Places and events and can create connections between them to create more accurate a complete pictures of current events. Calais has an API that allows others to use the functionality in their own products. Mashups = enrich and/or enhance your data one way or another by “mashing it up” with another technology e.g. position an list of addresses on a Google map. Scrapers = collect data from existing sources and structure. If a site does not have an API a little programme can be developed that pretends to be a person surfing the site but saves all the content in a data base. Examples: Dapper Teglo Yahoo Pipes The intelligent Web Summary: Web itself is becoming smarter, finding relations between information. Web Sites become web services. “ Unstructured information will give way to structured information – paving the road to more intelligent computing” (Alex Iskold) “ machine-facilitated understanding of information in order to provide a more productive and intuitive user experience” (John Markoff of the New York Times in 2006) Semantic web examples Natural language search Data-mining Machine learning Artificial intelligence technologies Applications can talk to each other Always connected Online identity Web as one big database Tim Berners-Lee, the father of the World Wide Web, the “visual” part of the internet where content can be linked has long been talking about the semantic web and his vision of “analysing all the data on the web and find relations” http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=mVFY52CH6Bc
  • Data mashups, Crime Mapping “ The purpose of this site is to help show where crime is occurring at a local neighbourhood level. It has been developed by the MPS in conjunction with the Metropolitan Police Authority and the Mayor of London.” http://maps.met.police.uk/
  • The value is in sharing, being part of... Guardian opens up their content “ You can use the Open Platform to develop tools exploiting the depth and quality of the Guardian's content “ API – Application Protocol Interface http://www.guardian.co.uk/open-platform
  • St. Mark's Square in Venice St. Marks Square is now a place, the cloud knows that it is Microsoft Photosynth can build 3D models that users can move through from a series of photos by computing angles and perspective of objects that it recognise between the photos. Builds on user generated content and can pull photos from photo sharing sites like Flickr. Using existing content with new technology to build relevance beyond what would be financially possible otherwise. The crazy ideas from 10 years ago are soon reality like the “Grocery-ordering refrigerator” or the “health-monitoring bathroom”. ...but today we can even imagine a Mashup of the two. Food ordered automatically based on your current wellness.
  • Image recognition, image processing in real time, built in Flash, became the hype of the marketing web early 2009. http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=NK59Beq0Sew
  • Our reality is already augmented and our bodies enhanced with technology. The penetration of mobile technology is dominant world wide. Google mobile operating system Android. Free for anyone who wants to install it on their hardware. Is based on Linux. 1MM units sold in three days (10MM apps downloaded over the same period); mobile browser market share already 50% > Windows Mobile The iPhone has changes what people expect from mobile interfaces with it’s proximity sensors, touch sensitivity and easy to use interface. 3 Skype Phone 500K+ units in < 200 days. Leverage large Skype user base of 370MM (+51%Y/Y) + create a low-cost webenabled VoIP social networking, digital presence phone. Fire eagle – location awareness from Yahoo Google latitude Let Fire eagle know where you are and have it displayed, broadcasted to where you have an online presence.
  • Tagging the reality Our physical world is being annotated. Information is being linked to physical locations through various technologies like GeoCodes, GPS enabled digital cameras, Google Earth or Microsofts Virtual Earth. Photographs are taken of most major cities and stitched together to create virtual representations of the real world.
  • Digital is dead, long live digital. Digital is moving into the physical world. Duck hunt the revenge physical video game by Hyper Island students. http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=BvYYLb-PCd4
  • Demonstrated at Ted.com by MIT researchers in January this year: the Sixth sense. http://www.ted.com/talks/pattie_maes_demos_the_sixth_sense.html
  • A mobile interface wherever you go.
  • Image recognition can bring up reviews in real time.
  • Facial image recognition mashed up with social networks could bring up a users profile in real time as we meet. Everybody knows. You are no longer in control. It is written over you.
  • With all this technology evolving all the time, so fast. What worked once might not work again, lost it’s novelty. How do we keep up? How do we do this? ...when the goal post is constantly changing. Master Class will paint a digital landscape, help you find your route through it.
  • Everything is stored and in this one giant machine We feed the cloud information about us as humans by interacting in the cloud. Uploading images, comment, reviews, thoughts We become dependant on the cloud, our profiles in the cloud The cloud becomes smarter, OCR, image recognition, semantics etc.
  • Everything is stored and in this one giant machine We feed the cloud information about us as humans by interacting in the cloud. Uploading images, comment, reviews, thoughts We become dependant on the cloud, our profiles in the cloud The cloud becomes smarter, OCR, image recognition, semantics etc.
  • Everything is stored and in this one giant machine We feed the cloud information about us as humans by interacting in the cloud. Uploading images, comment, reviews, thoughts We become dependant on the cloud, our profiles in the cloud The cloud becomes smarter, OCR, image recognition, semantics etc.
  • Everything is stored and in this one giant machine We feed the cloud information about us as humans by interacting in the cloud. Uploading images, comment, reviews, thoughts We become dependant on the cloud, our profiles in the cloud The cloud becomes smarter, OCR, image recognition, semantics etc.
  • http://www.istartedsomething.com/20090228/microsoft-office-labs-vision-2019-video/
  • Linking computers – The Net Linking pages – The Web Linking data – The one Semantic web, Web 3.0 Everything is stored and in this one giant machine We feed the cloud information about us as humans by interacting in the cloud. Uploading images, comment, reviews, thoughts We become dependant on the cloud, our profiles in the cloud The cloud becomes smarter, OCR, image recognition, semantics etc.
  • The graph shows the time intervals between key events in human history that has advanced mankind forward, paradigm shifts. It shows an exponential trend i.e. the time period between each paradigm shift gets shorter each time. Compiled by Ray Kurzweil On a social level are we already seeing existing structures, values, laws and norms challenged. On a technical level are we moving closer Singularity, when machines are powerful enough to improve themselves. “ Think of a Paradigm Shift as a change from one way of thinking to another. It's a revolution, a transformation, a sort of metamorphosis . It just does not happen, but rather it is driven by agents of change. For example, agriculture changed early primitive society. The primitive Indians existed for centuries roaming the earth constantly hunting and gathering for seasonal foods and water. However, by 2000 B.C., Middle America was a landscape of very small villages, each surrounded by patchy fields of corn and other vegetables.” http://www.taketheleap.com/define.html
  • 090827 Information Society Future Of And Digital Media Trends

    1. 1. Begin
    2. 2. http://www.linkedin.com/in/petterw
    3. 3. Who is Petter? August 2009 | petterw@kenandi.com | www.twitter.com/petterw Information Society
    4. 4. My foot print
    5. 5. informationarchitects.jp
    6. 7. http://www.last.fm/user/petterww
    7. 10. http://www.flickr.com/petterw/
    8. 14. http://www.linkedin.com/in/petterw
    9. 15. Your footprint? Go together in groups of 5 and draw together your shared online footprint. What are the main sites you visit or read? Where have you got a profile? What online tools do you use?
    10. 16. The future is already here - it is just unevenly distributed William Gibson
    11. 17. Technology vs. Social behaviour
    12. 18. Technology vs. Social
    13. 19. Web 2.0
    14. 20. ? Web 1.0 Web 2.0 Web 2.0
    15. 22. New type of services
    16. 23. <ul><li>The Cloud </li></ul><ul><li>Filters </li></ul><ul><li>Data portability </li></ul><ul><li>Intelligent web </li></ul><ul><li>Augmented reality </li></ul><ul><li>Technology </li></ul><ul><li>Social </li></ul><ul><li>Availability </li></ul><ul><li>Sharing </li></ul><ul><li>Trust </li></ul><ul><li>Beta culture </li></ul><ul><li>Profile </li></ul><ul><li>Honest </li></ul>
    17. 24. Tech: The Cloud
    18. 25. Soc: Availability
    19. 26. Soc: Availability
    20. 27. Soc: Availability – emergent powers
    21. 28. Tech: Filters – information overload
    22. 29. Tech: Filters
    23. 30. Mass media Blogs Micro blogs Tech: Filters – destination to flow
    24. 31. <ul><li>A powerful global conversation has begun. Through the Internet, people are discovering and inventing new ways to share relevant knowledge with blinding speed. As a direct result, markets are getting smarter—and getting smarter faster than most companies. </li></ul>Soc: Sharing
    25. 32. <ul><li>We're both inside companies and outside them. The boundaries that separate our conversations look like the Berlin Wall today, but they're really just an annoyance. We know they're coming down. We're going to work from both sides to take them down. </li></ul><ul><li>To traditional corporations, networked conversations may appear confused, may sound confusing. But we are organizing faster than they are. We have better tools, more new ideas, no rules to slow us down. </li></ul><ul><li>We are waking up and linking to each other. We are watching. But we are not waiting. </li></ul>Soc: Sharing – Cluetrain.com
    26. 33. Alain Bechellier - tinyurl.com/af34w4 Soc: Sharing – I share therefore I am
    27. 34. Soc: Sharing – I share therefore I am
    28. 35. Soc: Trust
    29. 36. Sharing + Filters : Attention Economy Sharing + Filters : Reputation as currency Marketing goes from a cost , to an investment in advocacy
    30. 37. Sharing + Filters : Attention Economy Sharing + Filters : Reputation as currency Marketing goes from a cost , to an investment in advocacy Top 10 ways to earn attention?
    31. 38. Soc: Profile
    32. 39. Social Entertainment Soc: Profile – value of virtual
    33. 40. Soc: Profile – personalisation
    34. 41. Soc: Profile
    35. 42. Tech: Data portability
    36. 43. Soc: Beta culture
    37. 44. Soc: Beta culture, make it yourself
    38. 45. Soc: Beta culture, hack it
    39. 46. Soc: Beta culture, constant change
    40. 47. Coca-Cola Freestyle
    41. 48. Coca-Cola Freestyle How would you improve the freestyle offering if it was connected to the Internet? Video
    42. 49. Coca-Cola Freestyle How would you improve the freestyle offering if it was connected to the Internet? Video It’s not advertisers who build brands anymore, the audience do.
    43. 50. Tech: Intelligent web
    44. 51. Tech: Intelligent web – Mashups
    45. 52. Tech: Intelligent web – APIs
    46. 53. Tech: Intelligent web
    47. 54. Tech: Augmented reality
    48. 55. Tech: Augmented reality
    49. 56. Tech: Augmented reality
    50. 57. Tech: Augmented reality
    51. 61. Soc: Honest
    52. 62. <ul><li>The Cloud </li></ul><ul><li>Filters </li></ul><ul><li>Data portability </li></ul><ul><li>Intelligent web </li></ul><ul><li>Augmented reality </li></ul><ul><li>Technology </li></ul><ul><li>Social </li></ul><ul><li>Availability </li></ul><ul><li>Sharing </li></ul><ul><li>Trust </li></ul><ul><li>Beta culture </li></ul><ul><li>Profile </li></ul><ul><li>Honest </li></ul>
    53. 63. <ul><li>The cloud </li></ul>4 emerging trends
    54. 64. 1. The cloud 2. Feeding the cloud 4 emerging trends
    55. 65. 1. The cloud 2. Feeding the cloud 3. The cloud becomes us 4 emerging trends
    56. 66. 1. The cloud 2. Feeding the cloud 3. The cloud becomes us 4. The cloud gains awareness 4 emerging trends
    57. 67. Microsoft Labs vision 2019
    58. 68. <ul><li>Linking computers – The Net </li></ul><ul><li>Linking pages – The Web </li></ul><ul><li>Linking data – The one </li></ul><ul><li>Linking things..... </li></ul>http:// www.ted.com/talks/kevin_kelly_on_the_next_5_000_days_of_the_web.html Kevin Kelly on TED.com
    59. 69. Wall of questions Talk in groups of 6 about your current biggest questions related to digital. Past, present and future. Put 4 questions on postITs. What does it mean? How does it work?
    60. 70. Paradigm shift
    61. 71. Keep on trucking [email_address]

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