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The Myth of Laziness
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The Myth of Laziness

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  • 1. The Myth of Laziness Output Failure by Dr. Paul A. Rodríguez
  • 2. Opening Discussion
    • Think of at least one person – either a student, a friend, or a family member – that you might be tempted to call “lazy”
    • Why would you label that person as lazy?
  • 3. Opening Discussion (cont.)
    • Is there a possible reason for that person ’s laziness?
    • What do you think you could do to help that person overcome the “laziness” or whatever it is that is blocking him/her from completing tasks?
  • 4. Output Failure
    • The discrepancies between a person ’s interests and abilities.
    • The student absorbs and processes information, but does not produce a product displaying his/her understanding of the information.
    • The student can take in information while listening and reading, but cannot convert that information to written language.
  • 5. Some Characteristics of People with Output Failure
    • View their work as useless.
    • Are part of a wide-spread spectrum of dysfunctions.
    • Have difficulty with memory, language, attending, or motor function.
  • 6. Neurodevelopment Dysfunction
    • Can be inborn or acquired.
    • The origin is unknown, but we do know that intake exceeds output.
    • Because the mind is forced to strain to produce output - output failure occurs.
  • 7. Written Language
    • The most difficult task.
    • OF students have trouble getting their thoughts on paper due to physical coordination, integration of thoughts, or fear of writing.
  • 8. Something to think about:
    • A child must be competent in many basic fields, but an adult can select his/her strongest field.
    • Writing helps to build and maintain brain pathways.
  • 9. Types of Output Failure
    • Motor Breakdown
    • Production Control Difficulties
    • Oral Language Dysfunction
    • Lack of Organization
    • Inputs for Outputs
  • 10. Motor Breakdown
    • Thoughts are creative but writing is laborious.
    • Have good reading skills but have trouble with math & writing.
    • From verbal input to motor output is overwhelming.
    • Often have health complaints - stomachaches, headaches.
  • 11. Motor Breakdown (cont.)
    • Gross motor and fine motor skills are lacking in growth needed for writing.
    • Motor problems do not respond to visual or verbal input.
    • Writing is illegible because the person does not perceive the letters accurately.
  • 12. Motor Breakdown (cont.)
    • Printing is preferred to cursive writing.
    • Finger agnosia - trouble keeping track of where the pen or pencil is located.
  • 13. Motor Breakdown: Strategies
    • Explain the student ’s strengths and weaknesses to him/her.
    • Grade level retention only destroys self-esteem.
    • Help student with writing by using recurring themes.
    • Help with spelling - the first & last letters are often right.
  • 14. Motor Breakdown: Strategies (cont.)
    • Oral recall of questions before writing.
    • Separate grades for writing.
    • Use of computer or Alpha Smart.
    • Tape record report first.
    • Print instead of cursive.
  • 15. Motor Breakdown: Strategies (cont.)
    • Writing should be in stages:
      • Brainstorm ideas
      • Arrange ideas in order
      • Rough draft
      • Correct errors
      • Final copy
  • 16. Motor Breakdown: Strategies (cont.)
    • A spelling journal could help with future writing.
    • Frequent breaks.
    • Use of squeeze ball.
    • Use of verbal skills.
    • Attention regulates the quality of output.
  • 17. Production Control Difficulties
    • Impulsive.
    • Lack of attention controls:
      • Previewing
      • Options
      • Pacing
      • Quality
      • Reinforcement
  • 18. Production Control Difficulties (cont.)
    • Lack of motivation leads to disengagement and chronic failure.
    • Material needs are strong.
  • 19. Oral Language Dysfunction
    • Letter-perfect handwriting in short and simple sentences.
    • Comprehension of language needs to occur with slowed speech.
    • Understands grammar but cannot use it in written language.
    • The person lacks original ideas.
  • 20. Oral Language Dysfunction (cont.)
    • There is a language failure even though the person appears normal in everyday conversations - less vocabulary, needs more concrete cues.
    • Often the problems involve mispronunciation, stuttering, and stammering.
  • 21. Something to think about:
    • Many incarcerated people have expressive language dysfunctions.
  • 22. Oral Language Dysfunction Strategies
    • Brainstorm to help generate ideas.
    • Encourage creativity.
    • Activate prior knowledge.
    • Work through problem solving.
    • Step-by-step directions.
  • 23. Oral Language Dysfunction Strategies (cont.)
    • Go through the planning stages of writing.
    • Time management skill-building.
    • Prioritizing.
    • Organize materials.
  • 24. Lack of Organization
    • Can ’t complete projects because can’t prioritize, multitask, or organize materials.
    • Strategies:
      • Work on building those skills
      • Step-by-step directions
  • 25. Inputs for Outputs
    • Poverty and home life can play a role.
    • Also, wealthy parents who are overly concerned with making their child happy, so they cannot delay gratification for their child.
    • Stress is a major factor.
  • 26. Inputs for Outputs (cont.)
    • Internal factors:
      • Optimism level.
      • Knowing own strengths & weaknesses.
      • Initiative.
      • Flexibility.
      • Adaptability.
      • The higher these factors, the less likely IforO will be a problem.
  • 27. Inputs for Outputs Strategies
    • Role models.
    • Work ethic of family needs to be present & verbalized.
    • Stop prolonged t.v. viewing.
    • Make a track record of successes.
    • Have positive peers.
  • 28. General Output Failure Strategies
    • Needs for Writing:
      • Letter formation
      • Keyboarding
      • Translate ideas to words
      • Recall of spelling & grammar
      • Get original thoughts to paper
      • Working through “writer’s block”
  • 29. General O.F. Strategies (cont.)
    • Developing Writing:
      • Strategic planning
      • Create a timeline
      • Brainstorm
      • Research
      • Arrange ideas
      • Rough draft
      • Revise
      • Final product - Assess it
  • 30. General O.F. Strategies (cont.)
    • Organizing for Writing:
      • Find materials
      • Keep materials organized
      • Manage time
      • Generate ideas
      • Organize thoughts - webbing, etc.
      • Follow stages of writing
  • 31. General O.F. Strategies (cont.)
    • Restoring Input:
      • Family discussions in home or car
      • Field trips
      • Visit parents ’ workplaces
      • Realistic after school activities - not too much time/energy
  • 32. General O.F. Strategies (cont.)
    • Restoring output:
      • No t.v. during homework time
      • Adults available to help with work
      • Organize room at home for school work: bookcase with books only, desk calendar (time management), file cabinet (with output experiments)
      • After school activities are realistic - not too much
      • Provide work incentives
  • 33. General O.F. Strategies (cont.)
    • Fostering Output at School:
      • Academic productivity
      • Creative projects
      • Motor mastery
      • Explain strengths & weaknesses
      • Encourage strengths
      • Optimism for team
  • 34. Ending Discussion
    • Think back to the person you thought of at the beginning of this topic.
    • Now, what do you think that you could do to help that person overcome the blocks which make him/her appear “lazy”?

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