Des Moines Bike Planning Overview

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Des Moines Bike Planning Overview

  1. 1. Des Moines Bicycle and Trails Master Plan TAC Meeting #1 June 18th, 2009
  2. 2. Project Work Plan • Final Product: Long-Range Bicycle Network Master Plan • Existing Conditions/Opportunities-and-Constraints • Safety and Needs Assessment • Recommended Bike Network • Education, Encouragement, Enforcement, Evaluation strategies • Funding and Implementation • Draft and Final Plan
  3. 3. Build on Previous/Current Planning Efforts • 2006 - City applies for bicycle friendly community designation and is rejected • 2007 – Council adopted goals to become a bicycle friendly community – conducting a bicycle and trails master plan is a key goal • 2008 – Council adopts a complete streets policy • 2009 – Alta is hired by City to conduct master plan
  4. 4. Bicycle Facilities Bike lanes Shared roadways • Wide outside lanes • Shared lane markings • Bicycle Boulevards Shared use paths
  5. 5. Bicyclist Types – For Whom do we Plan? • Strong and fearless • Enthusiastic and confident • Interested but concerned • No way, no how
  6. 6. The Bicyclist How much space needed? • 2-ft. wide handle bars • 1-ft. “buffer” on each side • Total: At least 4 ft.
  7. 7. Bicycle Facilities – How to Select? Numerous factors: • Road type (arterial, local street, etc.) • Traffic volumes • Speeds • Traffic mix (e.g., trucks, buses, etc.) • Expected users – skill, age, volume, destinations • Road conditions, space, intersections, parking demand
  8. 8. Bicycle Facilities – Bike Lanes • Install with new roadway • Pave shoulder/widen road • Reduce travel lane or parking lane widths • Remove travel lanes • Remove parking
  9. 9. Bicycle Facilities – Bike Lanes
  10. 10. Bicycle Facilities – Bike Lanes
  11. 11. Bicycle Facilities – Wide Outside Lanes • Used mostly on busy (arterial) streets with insufficient room for bike lanes • 14’ width desirable • Any wider should include a striped bike lane
  12. 12. Bicycle Facilities – Shared Lane Markings • Used in numerous cities worldwide • FHWA to adopt in 2009
  13. 13. Bicycle Facilities – Low Volume Streets • Great for getting around neighborhoods • Attract riders of all ages, confidence levels • Not always practical for longer distances
  14. 14. Bicycle Facilities – Bicycle Boulevards • Local streets modified to act as thru streets for bicyclists • Traffic calming reduces vehicle speeds & thru trips • Traffic controls give priority to thru bicycle movement • Work best in a connected grid
  15. 15. Bicycle Facilities – Bicycle Boulevards Intersection Treatments Signage Pavement Markings Traffic Calming Traffic Diversion
  16. 16. Bicycle Facilities - Challenges • Lack of well-defined routes • Major streets lacking bicycle facilities • System gaps • Conflicts with motorists (e.g., at driveways, intersections) • Glass, debris, obstructions in bike lanes/shoulders • Lack of bike parking
  17. 17. Shared Use Paths • Intended for pedestrians, bicyclists, other non- motorized users • Width: 10-14’ paved • Shy distance: 2-3’ • Overhead clearance: 8-10’ • Roadway separation: 5’ minimum
  18. 18. Shared Use Paths Keys to Successful Paths • Separate from vehicle traffic • Scenic qualities • Connected to land uses • Well-designed street crossings • Visibility • Separate different users when necessary • Proper maintenance
  19. 19. Other Infrastructure Elements
  20. 20. Programmatic Elements
  21. 21. Innovative Treatments
  22. 22. Thinking practical…..
  23. 23. ….. and thinking big
  24. 24. Questions??

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