Engaging the Online Reader through Social Media

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Learn how journalists are using social media to engage their audiences -- both to gather information and to promote content. Presented at AEJMC Gateway Teach-in for scholastic journalism educators, …

Learn how journalists are using social media to engage their audiences -- both to gather information and to promote content. Presented at AEJMC Gateway Teach-in for scholastic journalism educators, Aug. 9, 2011.

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  • 1. Engaging the Online Reader through Social Media Logan H. Aimone, executive director National Scholastic Press Association Online: slideshare.net/loganaimoneTuesday, August 9, 2011
  • 2. What is social media? It’s the use of Web-based and mobile technologies to turn communication into interactive dialogue. Engaging the Online Reader through Social MediaTuesday, August 9, 2011
  • 3. How journalists use social media Distribution: Sharing / referring content Crowdsourcing Searching for sources or subjects Interviewing Monitoring Story ideas User feedback / engagement Engaging the Online Reader through Social MediaTuesday, August 9, 2011
  • 4. Primary social media journalists use: Facebook / LinkedIn Google+ Twitter Vimeo / YouTube / Flickr Geolocating: Foursquare, Google Latitude/Maps, Gowalla, etc. Engaging the Online Reader through Social MediaTuesday, August 9, 2011
  • 5. Engaging the Online Reader through Social MediaTuesday, August 9, 2011
  • 6. FACEBOOK: Definition and statistics Among world’s largest social media websites with more than 750 million monthly active users who create a network of friends 250 million mobile users Average user has 130 friends 50% of users return daily to the site Photos are most popular shared and viewed item 280 million photos uploaded per day Source: Facebook + Journalists, July 2011 Engaging the Online Reader through Social MediaTuesday, August 9, 2011
  • 7. FACEBOOK: Impact “If searching for the news was the most important development of the last decade, sharing the news may be among the most important of the next.” — “Navigating News Online, Pew Research Center’s Project for Excellence in Journalism, May 2011 Facebook drove 3% of traffic to 21 of 25 news sites in study, and 8% of traffic to Huffington Post. Headlines have been organized by editors. Now they are organized by friends. Engaging the Online Reader through Social MediaTuesday, August 9, 2011
  • 8. FACEBOOK: Statistics Users are 3-4 times more likely to click “Like” for a story if they see a friend’s face as someone who “liked” the story. Journalists who post content on a page or profile are likely to get more traffic if they… Use a 4- or 5-line post Ask a question Include a thumbnail or photo Source: Facebook + Journalists, July 2011 Engaging the Online Reader through Social MediaTuesday, August 9, 2011
  • 9. FACEBOOK: Profiles & Pages A Facebook Profile is the standard user experience. An individual develops a personal network of friends (up to 5,000) and can share status updates, photos, links and videos. A Facebook Page is a more professional site where a journalist can share and interact while maintaining the traditional separation from sources and avoiding conflicts of interest. You can distribute, engage and have a public presence — and no limit to connections. Source: Facebook + Journalists, July 2011 Engaging the Online Reader through Social MediaTuesday, August 9, 2011
  • 10. FACEBOOK: Pages Nicholas Kristof of the New York Times uses Facebook to tell microstories. He says a good story is a good story on Facebook. Source: Facebook + Journalists, July 2011 Engaging the Online Reader through Social MediaTuesday, August 9, 2011
  • 11. Engaging the Online Reader through Social MediaTuesday, August 9, 2011
  • 12. FACEBOOK: Pages During breaking news, post often. Readers expect it. Engagement increases. Be transparent about who’s posting. Tag the person posting, or indicate in the text. Pages allow targeted distribution based on gender, age, location, language, etc. Provide a behind-the-scenes look Source: Facebook + Journalists, July 2011 Engaging the Online Reader through Social MediaTuesday, August 9, 2011
  • 13. FACEBOOK: Crowdsourcing Crowdsourcing is using the “crowd” to provide ideas, sources, information and leads. Submitted content Enlisting readers in the process Story ideas Direct access to the source (source available to respond to questions via Facebook, etc.) Using Questions feature for high engagement Let viewers decide content Source: Facebook + Journalists, July 2011 Engaging the Online Reader through Social MediaTuesday, August 9, 2011
  • 14. FACEBOOK: Other items Feeds don’t work. They’re impersonal and automated. Readers engage when they know a person is behind the post. Find sources with Search. Search public updates. Search administrators of Groups. Videocalling (soon with Skype) for interviews facebook.com/journalists Source: Facebook + Journalists, July 2011 Engaging the Online Reader through Social MediaTuesday, August 9, 2011
  • 15. Engaging the Online Reader through Social MediaTuesday, August 9, 2011
  • 16. GOOGLE+: Definition and statistics Similar to Twitter, Google+ allows a Google user to both follow and be followed online. One significant difference is the ability to group followers in “circles” and to determine what pieces of information are shared with which circle. People are not told the circle in which they are grouped. Additional features include the ability to save items to read later (compared to a linear stream of information), video chat in “hangouts,” and integration with other Google products like Gmail, Google Docs or YouTube. Source: Facebook + Journalists, July 2011 Engaging the Online Reader through Social MediaTuesday, August 9, 2011
  • 17. GOOGLE+: Definition and statistics The service launched June 28, 2011. In the first two weeks, it grew to 10 million users and within four weeks over 25 million users. Interestingly, only about 12.5% of users are women. The most popularly followed people on Google+ are Facebook CEO Mark Zuckerburg, Google founders Larry Page and Sergey Brin, and Mashable CEO Pete Cashmore. Oh, and Google hasn’t made an application programming interface (API), so there are no third-party programs. That means no FarmVille! Source: Facebook + Journalists, July 2011 Engaging the Online Reader through Social MediaTuesday, August 9, 2011
  • 18. GOOGLE+: Uses Because of the selective sharing options with “Circles” in Google+, a journalist could share some information publicly while some only with close friends. This avoids having people create two profiles — one public and one private — to share with different audiences. “Hangouts” could become the next focus group, group interview or way to interact with reporters or sources. “Sparks” allows a user to identify interest areas, and Google will suggest items — like a pre-search. The +1 button allows users to recommend items. Content can be downloaded. Engaging the Online Reader through Social MediaTuesday, August 9, 2011
  • 19. GOOGLE+: Big questions Will it replace Facebook? Maybe — if users can migrate content from an established social network and if Facebook doesn’t develop selective sharing. (Skype chat is coming soon in Facebook.) Will it be more like Google Buzz or Wave? Those services never really caught on as expected. Maybe the expectations were too high? Or was the product not innovative? What is the impact of friends discovering in which “circles” they have been placed? Engaging the Online Reader through Social MediaTuesday, August 9, 2011
  • 20. Engaging the Online Reader through Social MediaTuesday, August 9, 2011
  • 21. TWITTER: Definition and statistics Twitter is a microblogging website with mobile apps that provides 140-character updates. Users can have followers, follow others and be part of lists. Non-users can search or see public tweets. 200 million users and 350 billion tweets per day A hashtag is a term used to tag a post for search. It includes the # sign and a word, phrase or abbreviation. According to the Pew study, Twitter drove about 1% of referrals to news sites (and 3% for the Los Angeles Times). Engaging the Online Reader through Social MediaTuesday, August 9, 2011
  • 22. TWITTER: Uses The main uses for Twitter are distribution, engagement and monitoring. Build a network of relevant followers (and people to follow). Interact with them in the ways below. Use Twitter to share content or refer users to content. Use Twitter to engage with users: ask/answer questions, clarify, respond to criticism, get ideas. Use Twitter to monitor what others are tweeting about to get leads, ideas and sources. Curate tweets as basis for a sidebar in print or online. Engaging the Online Reader through Social MediaTuesday, August 9, 2011
  • 23. TWITTER: More uses Go to http://media.twitter.com/newsrooms #TfN Report: Search, sources and mobile apps Engage: Effective writing, promotion and branding Publish: Tools and display guidelines Extras: Blogs, copyright and troubleshooting Engaging the Online Reader through Social MediaTuesday, August 9, 2011
  • 24. Engaging the Online Reader through Social MediaTuesday, August 9, 2011
  • 25. VIMEO / YOUTUBE / FLICKR: Definition and statistics Vimeo and YouTube are video-sharing websites. Flickr is a photo/image-sharing site. Engaging the Online Reader through Social MediaTuesday, August 9, 2011
  • 26. VIMEO / YOUTUBE / FLICKR: Uses Vimeo and YouTube channels can be utilized for sharing extra video from a news story; a behind-the- scenes look at the journalist’s job; or to interact with users, like responding to queries. Flickr can be used in some of the same ways but with still images. All can also be used to search for sources or monitor what people are talking about or find interesting. Engaging the Online Reader through Social MediaTuesday, August 9, 2011
  • 27. Engaging the Online Reader through Social MediaTuesday, August 9, 2011
  • 28. GEOLOCATION APPS: Definition and statistics Typically, geolocation apps do two things: They report your location to other users. They associate real-world locations (such as restaurants and events) to your location. These apps use the GPS chip in a phone or mobile device to determine location. Apps like Foursquare allow users to “check in” at a location. Sometimes businesses will offer deals for checking in. Engaging the Online Reader through Social MediaTuesday, August 9, 2011
  • 29. GEOLOCATION: Uses Journalists can use geolocation apps to see who has checked in at a location or event. Use the apps to monitor buzz or develop story ideas. Some mobile apps like Yelp! allow users to post reviews of businesses. Combine geolocation with other mobile device-based tools such as QR codes or Groupons. Engaging the Online Reader through Social MediaTuesday, August 9, 2011
  • 30. Other digital media tools Delicious: Social bookmarking Tumblr: A place to post anything and everything Storify: A website that allows curation and combination of multiple elements from social media (like tweets, Facebook status updates, etc.) Instagr.am: Mobile photo sharing Evernote: Keep track of many bits of information from multiple formats Engaging the Online Reader through Social MediaTuesday, August 9, 2011
  • 31. How will you utilize these powerful new tools? They are evolving rapidly. Research data are becoming available, which will prove valuable to how journalists use the tools effectively. Engaging the Online Reader through Social MediaTuesday, August 9, 2011
  • 32. Questions? Find this presentation at slideshare.net/loganaimone Email me at logan@studentpress.org Engaging the Online Reader through Social MediaTuesday, August 9, 2011