Pronoun Reference
Review <ul><li>Pronoun--Word substituted for noun </li></ul><ul><li>Antecedent--Word the pronoun is replacing </li></ul><u...
Pronoun Reference <ul><li>It needs to be VERY CLEAR what antecedent the pronoun is referring to.  </li></ul><ul><li>If the...
Confusing Pronoun Reference Situations to Avoid
1) Ambiguous Pronoun Reference <ul><li>Ambiguous pronoun reference=when pronoun could refer to two possible antecedents. <...
2) Remote Pronoun Reference <ul><li>Remote pronoun reference=when pronoun is too far from the antecedent for easy reading....
3) Broad Use of THIS, THAT, WHICH and IT <ul><li>When using  this ,  that ,  which  or  it  make sure they refer to specif...
4) Implied Antecedents <ul><li>Implied antecedent=word that pronoun refers to that is not actually in the sentence </li></...
5) Indefinite use of THEY, IT and YOU <ul><li>Indefinite=doesn’t refer to specific person, place or thing </li></ul><ul><l...
6) Pronouns for Referring to People <ul><li>When referring to people using a pronoun use WHO or WHOSE   not  WHICH or THAT...
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Pronoun reference powerpoint

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  • Many of the allegedly ambiguous examples aren't, unless you're a pedant, and the substitutions are sometimes clumsy.



    For example, for 'He put a bullet in his gun and shot it.' any slight ambiguity is due to the use of 'shot' rather than 'fired' With the correct verb (but the same pronoun) there is no meaningful ambiguity. You can't fire the bullet without firing the gun.
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Pronoun reference powerpoint

  1. 1. Pronoun Reference
  2. 2. Review <ul><li>Pronoun--Word substituted for noun </li></ul><ul><li>Antecedent--Word the pronoun is replacing </li></ul><ul><li>Examples: </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Darla (antecedent)- She (pronoun) </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Shoe (antecedent)-It (pronoun) </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Cups (antecedent)-Those (pronoun) </li></ul></ul>
  3. 3. Pronoun Reference <ul><li>It needs to be VERY CLEAR what antecedent the pronoun is referring to. </li></ul><ul><li>If the antecedent is not clear, the reader can become confused. </li></ul>
  4. 4. Confusing Pronoun Reference Situations to Avoid
  5. 5. 1) Ambiguous Pronoun Reference <ul><li>Ambiguous pronoun reference=when pronoun could refer to two possible antecedents. </li></ul><ul><ul><li>When Gloria set the pitcher on the glass-topped table , it broke. </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Tom told James that he had won the lottery. </li></ul></ul><ul><li>To avoid ambiguity--Change words to be more clear </li></ul><ul><ul><li>The pitcher broke when Gloria set it on the glass-topped table. </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Tom told James , “ You have won the lottery.” </li></ul></ul>
  6. 6. 2) Remote Pronoun Reference <ul><li>Remote pronoun reference=when pronoun is too far from the antecedent for easy reading. </li></ul><ul><li>Happens in paragraphs or long sentences. </li></ul><ul><li>Example: </li></ul><ul><li>After the court ordered my ex-husband to pay child support, he refused. Eight months later, we were back in court. This time the judge ordered him to make payments directly to the court, which in turn would pay me. For the first six months I received regular payments, but they stopped. Again he was summoned to appear in court. WHO IS HE? Judge? Husband? </li></ul>
  7. 7. 3) Broad Use of THIS, THAT, WHICH and IT <ul><li>When using this , that , which or it make sure they refer to specific antecedents. This avoids confusion. </li></ul><ul><li>Example: </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Horatio and Claudette always forgot to complete their English homework, which accounts for their low grades. </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>What does which refer to? Not clear! </li></ul></ul></ul><ul><li>Use a fact instead. </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Horatio and Claudette always forgot to complete their English homework, their forgetfulness accounts for their low grades. </li></ul></ul>
  8. 8. 4) Implied Antecedents <ul><li>Implied antecedent=word that pronoun refers to that is not actually in the sentence </li></ul><ul><ul><li>John put a bullet in his gun and shot it . </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>What is it ? Not clear! </li></ul></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>John put a bullet in his gun and shot the gun . </li></ul></ul><ul><li>AVOID IMPLIED ANTECEDENTS </li></ul>
  9. 9. 5) Indefinite use of THEY, IT and YOU <ul><li>Indefinite=doesn’t refer to specific person, place or thing </li></ul><ul><li>DON’T USE THEY, IT or YOU to refer to a noun that hasn’t been mentioned in the sentence/paragraph. They aren’t indefinite pronouns </li></ul><ul><li>Example: </li></ul><ul><ul><li>At the restaurant, they gave me someone else’s linguini. </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>Who is they ? Not clear! </li></ul></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>At the restaurant, the waiter gave me someone else’s linguini. </li></ul></ul>
  10. 10. 6) Pronouns for Referring to People <ul><li>When referring to people using a pronoun use WHO or WHOSE not WHICH or THAT. (WHICH and THAT refer to things, not people) </li></ul><ul><li>Example: </li></ul><ul><ul><li>The student that was hiding in the bathroom was skipping class. WRONG </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>The student who was hiding in the bathroom was skipping class. RIGHT </li></ul></ul>
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