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Noun phrases

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Noun phrases

  1. 1. noun phrase
  2. 2. When we see a noun as performing a role in a sentence, we think of it as a noun phrase . A noun phrase may function as the subject or object of a clause. A noun phrase may consist of a single word (a noun or pronoun) or a group of words. The most important noun in a noun phrase is called the headword NOUN PHRASE
  3. 3. Example of noun phrases (headword in bracket) My old maths (teacher) was Austrian.
  4. 4. car red with a sunroof sporty My Did you see what happened to this noun? It’s just been expanded!!!
  5. 5. woman in black mysterious The Let’s see that again. The original single word ‘woman’ has been expanded, and this gives us more information.
  6. 6. The term noun phrase refers to a group of words which act like a noun. Words can go before the noun e.g. The great river e.g man of honour and/or after the noun. They modify the meaning of the noun.
  7. 7. Nouns often have other words in front of them. Determiners e.g. a, the, that, my, your, Adjectives e.g. little, blue, silly Verbs e.g. a buzzing bee Nouns , acting like adjectives e.g. the lemonade bottle
  8. 8. Words which go after a noun can modify it too, e.g. the kiss of death The girl with red hair was afraid of flying. She was determined to overcome this fear. Her aunt in America had invited her to stay and she wanted to go. Fears like this can be overcome, she decided. See if you can spot any in this passage. Did you spot these?
  9. 9. For now, we will refer to this string simply as the pre-Head string. A string of elements may also appear after the Head, and we will call this the post-Head string: [the small children in class 5 ] So we have a basic three-part structure Of these three parts, only the Head is obligatory . It is the only part which cannot be omitted from the phrase .   in class 5 ] children [ the small post - Head string Head pre - Head string
  10. 10. let's omit each part in turn : -- ] children [ the small in class 5 ] -- *[ the small in class 5 ] children [ -- post-Head string head pre - Head string
  11. 11. Pre - Head and post - Head strings can be omitted, while leaving a complete noun phrase . We can even omit the pre - and post - Head strings at the same time, leaving only the Head This is still a complete noun phrase . --] children [-- post - Head string Head pre - Head string
  12. 12. However, when the Head is omitted, we're left with an incomplete phrase (* the small in class five ). This provides a useful method of identifying the Head of a phrase. In general, the Head is the only obligatory part of a phrase.  
  13. 13. 1- Under line noun phrase in each of the following sentences : The girl with red hair was afraid of flying. She was determined to overcome this fear. Her aunt in America had invited her to stay and she wanted to go. Fears like this can be overcome, she decided. 2- Identify the Head in each of the following bracketed noun phrases : 1- ( Cats ) make very affectionate pets. ................................................................... 2- ( The editor ) rejected the manuscript . …………………………………………… 3- We drove through ( an enormous forest ) in Germany . ………………………………………… .. 4- ( People who cycle ) get very wet . ………………………………………… .. 5- We really enjoy ( the funny stories he tells ) . ………………………………………… .. Exercises
  14. 14. THANK YOU By : Eman Saeed Al-Zhrani Direction : Shadia Banjar
  15. 15. Sources http :// www . somerset - secondarystrategy . org / displaydocs . php?id = 301&type = public http :// www . worldofteaching . com / powerpoints / english / nouns . ppt http :// www . ucl . ac . uk / internet - grammar / phrases / np . htm

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