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Open access for researchers, policy makers and research managers, libraries
 

Open access for researchers, policy makers and research managers, libraries

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Open access for researchers: enlarged audience and citation impact, tenure and promotion. Open access for policy makers and research managers: new tools to manage a university’s image and impact. ...

Open access for researchers: enlarged audience and citation impact, tenure and promotion. Open access for policy makers and research managers: new tools to manage a university’s image and impact. Open access for libraries. Maintaining digital repository as a key function for research libraries.

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    Open access for researchers, policy makers and research managers, libraries Open access for researchers, policy makers and research managers, libraries Presentation Transcript

    • Open access for researchers, research managers and libraries Iryna Kuchma, eIFL Open Access program manager, eIFL.net Presented at “ Open Access: Maximising Research Quality and Impact ” wor kshop, July 22 2009, Kathmandu, Nepal
    • Why Open Access (OA)?
    • Why OA 2?
    • eIFL.net
    • 4 0 00 libraries in 46 countries
    • Nepal
    • eIFL.net programs
      • 1. Open access
      • 2. Advocacy for access to knowledge :
      • copyright and libraries
      • 3. Promoting free and open source software
      • for libraries
    • eIFL.net programs 2
      • 4. 1+1=More and better.
      • The benefits of library consortia
      • 5. Promoting a culture of cooperation: knowledge and information sharing
      • 6. Advocating for affordable and fair access to commercially produced scholarly resources
    • eIFL-IP: Copyright for libraries
      • to maximize access to knowledge via libraries for education, research and the public through fair and balanced copyright laws that take into account the needs of their users
      • to raise awareness of libraries and copyright, and to empower the eIFL.net community to become advocates and proponents of fair access for all
    • eIFL-IP: Copyright for libraries 2
      • Highlights from 2008 :
      • eIFL.net staff with coordinators from South Africa, Ukraine and Zambia
      • provided national copyright information
      • for the WIPO commissioned study
      • on library copyright exceptions and limitations covering 149 countries
    • eIFL-IP: Copyright for libraries 3
      • Highlights from 2008 continued :
      • eIFL.net and the European Bureau of Library, Information and Documentation Associations (EBLIDA) agreed to cooperate on copyright and European bi-lateral trade agreements
      • Responded to European Commission
      • Green Paper consultation on Copyright in the Knowledge Economy
    • eIFL-IP: Copyright for libraries 4
      • Highlights from 2008 continued :
      • Held first annual eIFL-IP global conference ,
      • attended by over 40 countries
      • Joint eIFL/IFLA/EBLIDA conference on copyright and libraries with 50+ librarians from Moldova and region plus policymakers
      • First self-organised seminar by regional eIFL-IP representatives in Zambia
    • eIFL-FOSS
      • Success of the Greenstone pilot
      • in Southern Africa ,
      • leading to the SA Greenstone Support Network
      •  
      • Launch of Integrated Library Systems (ILS) project
      •  
      • UNESCO award for a Linux Thin Server Project How To Guide from Birzeit University to help libraries extend or maximize the usefulness of old computers
    • Negotiations
      • eIFL.net is advocating
      • for affordable access
      • to commercially produced electronic journals and databases through collective negotiations with publishers and aggregators
      • negotiation activity includes not only obtaining affordable prices , but also establishing fair terms and conditions for access to those resources by library users in developing and transitional countries
    • Consortium building
      • eIFL.net assists the countries in the building of sustainable national library consortia
      • a wide range of activities underpins this goal including: training events, national and regional workshops and meetings, individual country visits, grants, manuals, web resources
    • eIFL Open Access
    • eIFL Open Access 2
      • Focus for 2009/10:
      • Open access policies to be adopted by research funding agencies, universities and research organisations in eIFL.net countries
      • Sustainability of open repositories within the eIFL region
    • eIFL Open Access 3
      • Open Access Week , 19-23 October 2009
      • Advocacy materials for eIFL.net countries
      • Turning pilot repositories into strong operational tools ( open access resources create value through the impact they have on users )
      • Watching briefs on open access to data and open educational resources
    • eIFL Open Access 4
      • Evaluation of Institutional Repository Development in Developing and Transition Countries – a cooperative program between eIFL.net, the University of Kansas Libraries, the DRIVER project and Key Perspectives Ltd
      • case studies on institutional repositories from eIFL countries
      • a report on the implementation of open content licenses in developing and transition countries
    • What do scientists want?
    • What do scientists want? http :// wwmm . ch . cam . ac . uk / blogs / murrayrust /?p=1502
    • Story #1 : arXiv.org
    •  
    • Open Access Impact
      • Open access brings more rapid and
      • more efficient progress for scholarly research
      • http:// arxiv .org/
      • “ Brody has looked at the pattern of citations
      • to articles deposited in arXiv, specifically
      • at the length of the delay between
      • when an article is deposited and when it is cited,
      • and has published the aggregated data
      • for each year from 1991.”
        • Brody, Tim; Harnad, Stevan; Carr, Leslie. Earlier web usage statistics as predictors of later citation impact. Journal of the American Association for Information Science and Technology (JASIST), 2005, Vol. 57 no. 8 pp. 1060-1072. http://eprints.ecs.soton.ac.uk/10713/01/timcorr.htm (accessed 30 October 2006)
        • Open Access: What is it and why should we have it? - ECS EPrints ...Open Access: What is it and why should we have it? Swan, A. (2006) Open Access: What is it and why should we have it? http:// eprints . ecs . soton .ac. uk /13028/
    • Open Access Impact 2
      • “ As more papers are deposited and
      • more scientists use the repository ,
      • the time between an article being deposited
      • and being cited has been shrinking dramatically ,
      • year upon year”
      • Brody, Tim; Harnad, Stevan; Carr, Leslie. Earlier web usage statistics as predictors of later citation impact. Journal of the American Association for Information Science and Technology (JASIST), 2005, Vol. 57 no. 8 pp. 1060-1072. http://eprints.ecs.soton.ac.uk/10713/01/timcorr.htm (accessed 30 October 2006)
        • Open Access: What is it and why should we have it? - ECS EPrints ...Open Access: What is it and why should we have it? Swan, A. (2006) Open Access: What is it and why should we have it? http:// eprints . ecs . soton .ac. uk /13028/
    •  
    • Open Access Impact 3
      • “ This is important
      • for research uptake and progress ,
      • because it means that in this area of research,
      • where articles are made available at –
      • or frequently before – publication ,
      • the research cycle is accelerating ”
      • Brody, Tim; Harnad, Stevan; Carr, Leslie. Earlier web usage statistics as predictors of later citation impact. Journal of the American Association for Information Science and Technology (JASIST), 2005, Vol. 57 no. 8 pp. 1060-1072. http://eprints.ecs.soton.ac.uk/10713/01/timcorr.htm (accessed 30 October 2006)
        • Open Access: What is it and why should we have it? - ECS EPrints ...Open Access: What is it and why should we have it? Swan, A. (2006) Open Access: What is it and why should we have it? http:// eprints . ecs . soton .ac. uk /13028/
    • Open Access Impact 4
      • “ T he research cycle in high energy physics
      • is approaching maximum efficiency
      • as a result of the early and free availability
      • of articles that scientists in the field
      • can use and build upon rapidly ”
        • Brody, Tim; Harnad, Stevan; Carr, Leslie. Earlier web usage statistics as predictors of later citation impact. Journal of the American Association for Information Science and Technology (JASIST), 2005, Vol. 57 no. 8 pp. 1060-1072. http://eprints.ecs.soton.ac.uk/10713/01/timcorr.htm (accessed 30 October 2006)
        • Open Access: What is it and why should we have it? - ECS EPrints ...Open Access: What is it and why should we have it? Swan, A. (2006) Open Access: What is it and why should we have it? http:// eprints . ecs . soton .ac. uk /13028/
    • Story #2 : research article by cogdogblog http :// www . flickr . com / photos / cogdog /1635259272/
    • Uploaded b y Paul L McCord Jr http :// www . flickr . com / photos / plmccordj /2210724072/ and http :// www . flickr . com / photos / plmccordj /2209930435/ in / photostream /
    •  
    •  
    •  
    •  
    •  
    • Scholarly communication
      • Science is dynamic and collaborative and it is important to sustain the communication processes , rather than simply archiving research results in the form of a single journal article
    •  
    •  
    •  
    •  
    •  
    •  
    • Open education
    •  
    • Open Access
      • “ It is important to stress here
      • that publishing is a fundamental part
      • of the process of doing science .
      • Moreover, as a scientist I am not writing for money —
      • like my wife, who was a professional writer at one time —
      • but I am writing for fame:
      • I want everyone to read what I write…
      • For that reason we volunteer our services,
      • and we don’t get paid.
      • That is what makes Open Access
      • a powerful concept for scientists. ”
      • The Basement Interviews Freeing the scientific literature Harold Varmus, Nobel laureate, former director of the US National Institutes of Health, and co-founder of open access publisher Public Library of Science, talks to Richard Poynder. Published on June 5th 2006 http:// poynder . blogspot .com/2006/06/interview-with- harold - varmus .html
    •  
    • Helicopter flight by phault http :// www . flickr . com / photos / pjh /171451412/
    • 2 complementary strategies: Gold by Vitó http :// www . flickr . com / photos / janeladeimagens /192943825/
    • www. doaj .org
    •  
    • www. doaj .org
    •  
    • www. doaj .org
    •  
    • First Monday (Thank you Edward J. Valauskas !)
      • Contributions to First Monday
      • have routinely been expanded
      • into book form
      • by their authors
      • after initial publication in First Monday
    • Here are a few examples:
      • "The social life of documents"
      • by John Seely Brown and Paul Duguid
      • First Monday, volume 1, number 1 (May 1996)
      • was expanded into the book entitled
      • The social life of information
      • Boston: Harvard Business School Press, 2000.
      • (reprinted by Harvard Business School Press in 2002 and 2006; Dutch translation "De waarde van informatie" published in 2000; Chinese translation "Zi xun ge ming le shen me?" in 2001; Korean translation "Bit`u eso ingan uro" in 2001; Portuguese translation "A vida social da informação" in 2001; Spanish translation "La vida social de la información" in 2001; Turkish translation "Enformasyonun sosyal yasami" in 2001; Japanese translation "Naze aiti wa shakai o kaenainoka" in 2002).
    • Here are a few examples:
      • "Digital diploma mills:
      • The automation of higher education"
      • by David F. Noble
      • First Monday, volume 3, number 1 (January 1998)
      • was expanded into the book entitled
      • Digital diploma mills: The automation of higher education
      • New York: Monthly Review Press, 2001.
      • (reprinted 2002 with new afterward by the author)
    • Here are a few examples:
      • "The cathedral and the bazaar"
      • by Eric S. Raymond
      • First Monday, volume 3, number 3 (March 1998)
      • was expanded into the book entitled
      • The cathedral and the bazaar
      • Cambridge, Mass.: O'Reilly, 1999.
      • (Revised edition 2001)
    • First Monday
      • has cooperated with MIT Press
      • in publishing excerpts
      • from new
      • books
      • in the virtual pages of the journal
    • Here are a few examples:
      • - Information ecologies: Using technology with heart by Bonnie A Nardi and Vicki O'Day
      • Cambridge, Mass. : MIT Press, 1999.
      • excerpts in First Monday, volume 4, number 5 (May 1999)
      • -  Change of state: Information, policy and power by Sandra Braman
      • Cambridge, Mass.: MIT Press, 2006.
      • excerpts in First Monday, volume 12, number 4 (April 2007)
      •   - Acting with technology: Activity theory and interaction design by Victor Kaptelinin and Bonnie Nardi
      • Cambridge, Mass.: MIT Press, 2006.
      • excerpts in First Monday, volume 12, number 4 (April 2007)
    • First Monday
      • Content from First Monday
      • has re-appeared in a variety of newspapers,
      • magazines, and journals around the world :
      • Business Week,
      • Los Angeles Times,
      • New York Times,
      • Scientific American,
      • Washington Post,
      • and Wired, among others
    •  
    •  
    •  
    • https :// wiki . library . jhu . edu / display / epubs / Home ? showChildren = false
    • 2 complementary strategies - Green by Jim Frazier http :// www . flickr . com / photos / jimfrazier /140042827/
    • http :// www . opendoar . org /
    • http :// roar . eprints . org /
    •  
    •  
    • Open repositories
      • A digital repository is defined as
      • containing research output
      • institutional or thematic
      • and OAI compliant
      • ( http://www. openarchives .org/OAI/ openarchivesprotocol .html )
        • (From The European Repository Landscape Inventory Study into the Present Type and Level of OAI-Compliant Digital Repository Activities in the EU by Maurits van der Graaf and Kwame van Eijndhoven)
    • Content
      • Peer-reviewed articles
      • Conference presentations
      • Books
      • Course packs
      • Annotated images
      • Audio and video clips
      • Research data
    • Content
      • Gray literature :
      • Preprints / working materials /
      • theses and dissertations / reports /
      • conference materials / bulletins /
      • grant applications / reports to the donors / memorandums / statistical reports /
      • technical documentation / questionnaires…
    • http :// oad . simmons . edu / oadwiki / Disciplinary _ repositories
    •  
    •  
    • http ://search3. driver .research- infrastructures . eu / webInterface / simpleSearch . do ; jsessionid =30E69E7F5FDBD7BB9CB5AC829852074B? action = load
    • OA for students
      • Moving from print to electronic
      • – usage growth 145%
      • The most popular theses and dissertations
      • were downloaded 37,501 times (history )
      • and 33,752 times (engineering);
      • history one was published and was a long seller
      • (John Hagen, West Virginia University )
    • OA for students 2
      • 69% of students
      • from the creative writing department
      • had more successful careers
      • if they went OA with their dissertations –
      • a good marketing tool for them
      • (John Hagen, West Virginia University )
    • http :// opcit . eprints . org /oacitation- biblio . html
    •  
    • Leverage by L es C arr : http :// www . slideshare . net / lescarr / leverage ? type = powerpoint The Repository has made a splash page, with previews and usage stats ( Example from EPrints at University of Southampton)
    • Leverage by L es C arr : http :// www . slideshare . net / lescarr / leverage ? type = powerpoint The repository has made a bibliography for you …( Example from DSpace at Universiteit Hasselt, Belgium)
    • Leverage by L es C arr : http :// www . slideshare . net / lescarr / leverage ? type = powerpoint …maybe personalised it with other information about you… ( Example from DSpace at University of Chicago, Illinois)
    • Leverage by L es C arr : http :// www . slideshare . net / lescarr / leverage ? type = powerpoint …set up a mailing list for you… Example from Digital Commons at Cal Poly
    • Leverage by L es C arr : http :// www . slideshare . net / lescarr / leverage ? type = powerpoint Automatically updated your research group web pages (Example from IAM web site at University of Southampton, UK)
    • Leverage by L es C arr : http :// www . slideshare . net / lescarr / leverage ? type = powerpoint Less Administration: Management will use the information for the admin forms you would otherwise have to complete
    • Leverage by L es C arr : http :// www . slideshare . net / lescarr / leverage ? type = powerpoint Update your Teaching Pages
    • Why open repositories?
      • Opening up the outputs
      • of the institution to the world
      • Maximizing the visibility and impact
      • of these outputs
      • Showcasing the quality of the research
      • in the institution
    • Why open repositories?
      • Collecting and curating
      • the digital outputs of the institution
      • Managing and measuring
      • research and teaching activities
      • Providing a workspace for work-in-progress
      • and for collaborative and large-scale projects
    • Why open repositories?
      • Enabling and encouraging
      • interdisciplinary approaches to research
      • Facilitating the development and sharing
      • of digital teaching materials and aids
      • Supporting student endeavours ,
      • providing access to theses and dissertations
      • and a location for the development of e-portfolios
    • Why open repositories?
      • Institutional and national level
      • research assessment and research management , bringing together research expertise
      • across the institution and country
      • Information rich collaboration ,
      • effective decision-making
      • and successful research activity
      • Improved governmental policy
      • and public health care outcomes
    •  
    • The Power of Open Access
      • There are considerable
      • economic, social and educational benefits
      • to making research and other outputs available without financial, legal and technical
      • barriers to access
    •  
    •  
    • OA mandates
    • http :// www . arl . org / bm ~ doc /transformational- times . pdf
    • Common Themes
      • “ Libraries need to change their practices
      • for managing traditional content
      • and develop new capabilities
      • for dealing with digital materials of all types,
      • but especially new forms of scholarship, teaching and learning resources,
      • special collections
      • (particularly hidden collections),
      • and research data.”
    • Common Themes 2
      • “ Content industries
      • inevitably seek to extend control over the copyright regime and over content, in general, while libraries, authors, and research institutions endeavor to provide more access to and active management
      • of the intellectual assets produced by the academy.”
    • Common Themes 3
      • “ Radical reconfiguration of research library organizations and services is needed
      • coupled with an increasingly diverse and talented staff
      • to provide needed leadership
      • and technical skills
      • to respond to the rapidly changing environment .”
    • Common Themes 4
      • “ New relationships
      • must be formed with library users
      • to support rapid shifts
      • in research and teaching practices .”
    • Trends in Scholarly Communication
      • Transformations in scholarly communication practices are driving development
      • and re-engineering of library services:
      • • Libraries are moving into new service areas
      • like publishing support and repository services .
      • Repository services are moving beyond pre-print and post-print dissemination to include a wide range of content types, clients, and service needs.
    • Trends in Scholarly Communication
      • Library services
      • increasingly are developed
      • in collaboration with other units on campus
      • and with partners at other institutions.
    • Trends in Scholarly Communication
      • “ the economic situation
      • could be favourable
      • to the further development
      • of open access publishing”
    • Trends in Scholarly Communication
      • “ Open Access publication mandates
      • may well be adopted by the funding councils
      • Data preservation will also likely be more widely mandated .
      • Systematic enforcement of the mandates
      • will depend on the development
      • of appropriate repositories,
      • whether disciplinary or institutional .”
    • OA & libraries
      • OA
      • has permanently changed
      • the field of scholarly communication
    • OA & libraries 2
      • OA has changed
      • the profile of academic and research libraries
      • – more and more they have become partners
      • in research, data-curation and education ,
      • ensuring the quality of digital resources
      • is maintained, and openly sharing these resources with their users
    • OA & libraries 3
      • Academic and research libraries
      • are also developing
      • advanced and enhanced metrics
      • – a new range of standardized indicators based on reader (rather than author-facing) metrics
      • and much more still remains to be explored
    • Map of science
    • Changing landscape
      • In this changing environment
      • for scholarly communication
      • academic and research libraries
      • need to be
      • agile,
      • creative,
      • risk-taking
      • and innovative
      • in order to respond to the needs
      • of a new generation of faculty and students
    • Changing landscape 2
      • Science is dynamic
      • and collaborative
      • and it is important
      • to sustain the communication processes,
      • rather than to simply archive research results
      • in the form of a single journal article
    • Changing landscape 3
      • Librarians and information specialists
      • need to be involved in the early planning
      • and data-modelling phases
      • of research
      • in order to accelerate learning
      • and discovery,
      • and libraries will need
      • to become core collaborators on campus,
      • using technology
      • to advance scholarly communication
      • and enable a climate of openness
    • http :// www . arl . org / bm ~ doc /repository-services- report . pdf
    •  
    • Next steps – researchers and students
      • Publish articles in OA journals
      • Self-archive in open repositories
      • Spread a word about OA
    • Next steps – researcher managers
      • Introduce OA polices
      • Transform the journals into OA journals
      • Set-up open repositories
      • Spread a word about OA
    • Next steps – libraries
      • Set-up open repositories
      • Help researchers and students to self-archive
      • Help to publish OA journals and create open educational resources
    • Next steps – libraries 2
      • Help in data curation and sharing
      • Spread a word about OA
    •  
    • Thank you ! Questions ? Iryna Kuchma iryna.kuchma[at]eifl.net; www. eifl .net The presentation is licensed with Creative Commons Attribution 3.0 License