Hidden Vegetables:
A collaborative approach to
embedding information and academic
literacies in the curriculum
Lucy Carrol...
The Hidden Vegetables
‘The hidden vegetables refer to the policy drivers, like graduate attributes and
employability skill...
‘Generic’ PDP sessions
Dates Times & Rooms Session Lecturers
Week 1 Monday 12-1, R101 Lecture: Introduction to PDP Alison ...
A New Approach
PDP as ‘being and becoming’ a scientist; a focus on the
process of PDP as it relates to subject learning, a...
Assessment
Graduate
Attributes
Student
HEA
Employability
Profiles
UWS
Graduate
Attributes
SCQF/
Learning
Outcomes PDP/
ePo...
Essay
Graduate
Attributes
Student
HEA
Employability
Profiles
UWS
Graduate
Attributes
SCQF/
Learning
Outcomes PDP/
ePortfol...
Essay
Graduate
Attributes
Student
HEA
Employability
Profiles
UWS
Graduate
Attributes
SCQF/
Learning
Outcomes PDP/
ePortfol...
Essay
Graduate
Attributes
Student
HEA
Employability
Profiles
UWS
Graduate
Attributes
SCQF/
Learning
Outcomes PDP/
ePortfol...
Academic Literacies
• Literacies as social practice (Lea and Street 1998,
2004).
• Writing in Higher Education ‘involves n...
Class sessions
Class sessions
The hidden vegetables
Information literacy
“Information literacy is knowing when and why you need
information; where to find it; and how to eval...
Class content
• “The average temperature in winter is
lower than in summer.”
– Established fact, wouldn’t need a reference...
UWS CoRE Referencing Toolkit
The hidden vegetables
Assessment Data
•10 % increase in students from 2011-12 to 2012-13
•23 % improvement in average module mark
•15 % increase...
Impact of the New Approach
•Enhanced module metrics
•Explicit contextualised approach to PDP – student awareness of reflec...
The way forward
• Programme based development
• Learning objects at all programme levels
 Support for ‘vertical’ student ...
References
Chartered Institute of Library and Information Professionals (2004) Information
Literacy: definition. [Online] ...
Questions, comments,
reflections…
 Lucy Carroll
Subject Librarian (Sciences)
University of the West of Scotland
Paisley
P...
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A collaborative approach to embedding information and academic literacies in the curriculum - Lucy Carroll & Alison McEntee

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A collaborative approach to embedding information and academic literacies in the curriculum - Lucy Carroll & Alison McEntee

  1. 1. Hidden Vegetables: A collaborative approach to embedding information and academic literacies in the curriculum Lucy Carroll Subject Librarian (Sciences) Alison McEntee Effective Learning Tutor
  2. 2. The Hidden Vegetables ‘The hidden vegetables refer to the policy drivers, like graduate attributes and employability skills, that are already present in the curriculum. They are initially hidden from students, but if they stay hidden, students don’t understand them or realise their significance for their learning and development. When hiding vegetables in children's food, we delight in telling them, after the fact, that they’ve eaten something that was good for them. So we explicitly tell students; “here’s what we’ve just taught you, and here’s how it will help you develop as a graduate”. The embedded sessions add colour and flavour to their learning, and encourage them to engage with the ‘vegetables’ in the future!’
  3. 3. ‘Generic’ PDP sessions Dates Times & Rooms Session Lecturers Week 1 Monday 12-1, R101 Lecture: Introduction to PDP Alison McEntee, Neil Pitcher Week 2 Monday 12-1, 2-4 in ICT or Tuesday 3-5 in ICT Computer lab: ePortfolios. This is an informal hands-on session. Turn up at any of these time slots, the session should take you about 40 minutes. Neil Pitcher, Richard Thacker, Alison McEntee Week 3 Monday 12-1, R101 Lecture: Academic Writing Alison McEntee Week 4 Monday 12-1, R101 Lecture: Library Skills Lucy Carroll Week 12 Monday 1130-1230, R101 Lecture: PDP summary, exam skills, “What Next?” Evaluation Richard Thacker, Alison McEntee, Neil Pitcher
  4. 4. A New Approach PDP as ‘being and becoming’ a scientist; a focus on the process of PDP as it relates to subject learning, and students development as a science graduate: Trimester one • Generic PDP sessions delivered alongside cells and molecules lectures • Linked to tutorial on academic writing relating to specific essay question and session on referencing and plagiarism Trimester two • Direct input into scientific investigation module • Lectures on literature searching for case study; group work and writing a case study report; and poster presentations • Lecture on reflective writing for e-portfolio
  5. 5. Assessment Graduate Attributes Student HEA Employability Profiles UWS Graduate Attributes SCQF/ Learning Outcomes PDP/ ePortfolio Assessment Assessment
  6. 6. Essay Graduate Attributes Student HEA Employability Profiles UWS Graduate Attributes SCQF/ Learning Outcomes PDP/ ePortfolio Assessment Assessment
  7. 7. Essay Graduate Attributes Student HEA Employability Profiles UWS Graduate Attributes SCQF/ Learning Outcomes PDP/ ePortfolio Assessment Assessment
  8. 8. Essay Graduate Attributes Student HEA Employability Profiles UWS Graduate Attributes SCQF/ Learning Outcomes PDP/ ePortfolio Assessment Assessment
  9. 9. Academic Literacies • Literacies as social practice (Lea and Street 1998, 2004). • Writing in Higher Education ‘involves new ways of knowing; new ways of understanding, interpreting and organising knowledge’ (Lea and Street 1998, p.158). • Writing as ‘usefully problematic’; writing to learn and learning to write (Britton 1982, p.94).
  10. 10. Class sessions
  11. 11. Class sessions
  12. 12. The hidden vegetables
  13. 13. Information literacy “Information literacy is knowing when and why you need information; where to find it; and how to evaluate, use and communicate it in an ethical manner.” (CILIP, 2013). “Knowing when and why you need information” – exploring the essay question “Where to find information“– finding information for essays & finding literature for a case study “How to evaluate, use and communicate information in an ethical manner “– how & why should you reference & how to avoid plagiarism
  14. 14. Class content • “The average temperature in winter is lower than in summer.” – Established fact, wouldn’t need a reference. • “The coldest temperature ever recorded in the UK is -27.2°C” – Stating a specific fact that isn’t widely known, would need a reference for this. • “It rains more on the west coast of Scotland than the east coast of Scotland.” – Making a claim, would need evidence (e.g. records of rainfall reported in a text book) to back this up. Needs a reference.
  15. 15. UWS CoRE Referencing Toolkit
  16. 16. The hidden vegetables
  17. 17. Assessment Data •10 % increase in students from 2011-12 to 2012-13 •23 % improvement in average module mark •15 % increase in pass rate after resit •86 % increase in PDP mark and 64 % increase in PDP engagement
  18. 18. Impact of the New Approach •Enhanced module metrics •Explicit contextualised approach to PDP – student awareness of reflection •Student engagement in the PDP process – improved feedback •Building on trimester 1 to produce a solid Level 7 platform for integrated growth •Improved quality of output (writing skills, referencing, information literacy, presentation skills)
  19. 19. The way forward • Programme based development • Learning objects at all programme levels  Support for ‘vertical’ student development • Embedding of  Academic literacies  Digital and information literacy  Policy drivers embedded as learning processes • Will inform curriculum development and module assessment • Joint working between academics and support services
  20. 20. References Chartered Institute of Library and Information Professionals (2004) Information Literacy: definition. [Online] Available: http://www.cilip.org.uk/get- involved/advocacy/information-literacy/pages/definition.aspx [Accessed: 14 June 2013]. Higher Education Academy (2007) Student Employability profiles, A guide. [Online] Available: http://www- new2.heacademy.ac.uk/resources/detail/employability/Employability_profiles_ print_pdf [Accessed 20 August 2013]. Lea, Mary R. (2004) Academic literacies: a pedagogy for course design. Studies in Higher Education. Vol.29(6), pp. 739-756. Lea, Mary R. and Street, Brian V.(1998) Student writing in higher education: An academic literacies approach. Studies in Higher Education. Vol.23(2), pp. 157- 172. Britton, J. and Pradl, G. (ed.) (1982) Prospect and retrospect: Selected essays of James Britton. London: Heinemann.
  21. 21. Questions, comments, reflections…  Lucy Carroll Subject Librarian (Sciences) University of the West of Scotland Paisley PA1 2BE Tel : 0141 849 4116 Email : lucy.carroll@uws.ac.uk  Alison McEntee Effective Learning Tutor University of the West of Scotland Paisley PA1 2BE Tel : Email : alison.mcentee@uws.ac.uk

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