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Effects of a flipped classroom intervention in a large enrolment academic skills course - Lag

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Presented at LILAC 2017

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Effects of a flipped classroom intervention in a large enrolment academic skills course - Lag

  1. 1. Torstein Låg Rannveig Grøm Sæle, Espen Bjørkedal, Morten Øvervoll A flipped classroom intervention in a large enrolment academic skills course Paper presented at Librarians' Information Literacy Annual Conference (LILAC), Swansea, April 2017
  2. 2. This is the story of… … an ongoing struggle, … a near disaster, … a moderate success, … and some lessons learned.
  3. 3. Outline •Background: Setting, problem •The two cohorts, and how they were taught •Assessment: The assignment and the grading rubric •Results: Rubric scores, Fail/Withdraw/Pass rates •Conclusions & Limitations •Lessons learned and the road ahead
  4. 4. The setting
  5. 5. The problem How to help students become adept and information literate learners at university?
  6. 6. PSY-0700 Thinking, learning and writing in higher education Learning strategies • Describe conditions conducive to learning • Evaluate your own learning strategies • Judge your own knowledge on a topic • Planning for effective learning
  7. 7. PSY-0700 Thinking, learning and writing in higher education Basic practical skills • Perform simple topic searches for scholarly literature using appropriate resources • Retrieve literature from library collections • Construct text with a clear main message and clear structure • Cite sources correctly • Keep an accurate reference list in APA style
  8. 8. PSY-0700 Thinking, learning and writing in higher education General academic skills • Identify the main message of a text • Recognise common forms of valid and invalid arguments • Judge the soundness of arguments • Build your own independet argument • Use simple rules of thumb to judge the validity and relevance of a source • Use sources to support an argument • Avoid plagiarism
  9. 9. Assessment •Written home exam, student's own research question •All specifics (including grading rubric and grader instructions) available to students on first day of class
  10. 10. The grading rubric
  11. 11. The 2015 version •232 students •Weekly plenary lectures (2x45 min) • Large auditorium • Little or no interactivity •Weekly "seminar" (2x45 min) • Groups of 10-30 students • Led by senior students • Activities and discussion
  12. 12. Herbert Simon (1916 – 2001) «Learning results from what the student does and thinks and only from what the student does and thinks. The teacher can advance learning only by influencing what the student does to learn.» Quoted in Ambrose S.A., Bridges M.W., DiPietro M., et al. (2010) How learning works: 7 research-based principles for smart teaching. San Francisco, CA: Jossey-Bass. (Portrait by Richard Rappaport, 1987. Wikimedia Commons.)
  13. 13. The essence of the flipped classroom IN THE CLASSROOM: OUTSIDE OF THE CLASSROOM: Teacher-centered, "information transmission" teaching Student-centered learning activities What happens in the traditional model: Not a lot What happens in the flipped model: flip
  14. 14. The 2016 version • 315 students • Weekly pre-class: • 1-4 video lectures (approx. 10 min each; posted on Youtube; links in LMS) • Simple comprehension check quiz in LMS • Mandatory pre-class assignement • Weekly in-class (2x45 min) • Groups of 10-25 students • Led by authors • Structured activity based on pre-class assignment • NB!: Students were turned away if they had not done the pre- class assignment.
  15. 15. Results: Average rubric score 60 62 64 66 68 70 Mean = 65.8 SD = 20.2 N = 187 Mean = 68.4 SD = 16.6 N = 226 Figure 1. Average rubric scores by cohort year. Bars represent SEM. 2015 2016 Unequal sample t-test, not assuming equal variance (df from Statterthwaite correction): t(359.6) = 1.4, p = .16 - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - Standardized mean difference: Cohen's d = 0.14
  16. 16. Results: Pass vs. Fail Pass Fail (Marginal row totals) Traditional (2015) 123 (63 %) 72 (37 %) 195 Flipped (2016) 173 (68 %) 83 (32 %) 256 (Marginal column totals) 296 155 451 (Grand total) Table 1. Pass rate in students who submitted an exam Note. χ2= .99, p = .32
  17. 17. Results: Pass vs. Fail+Withdrawn Pass F + W (Marginal row totals) Traditional (2015) 123 (53 %) 109 (47 %) 232 Flipped (2016) 173 (55 %) 142 (45 %) 315 (Marginal column totals) 296 251 547 (Grand total) Table 2. Pass rate in students who registered for the course Note. χ2= .19, p = .66
  18. 18. Conclusions & Limitations Limitations • No random allocation • No blinding • Numerous possible confounds Conclusions • Flipping a large enrolment academic skills course is viable • Ensuring «uptake» can be tricky
  19. 19. Lessons learned: Balance “Balancing stones” by fotologic is licensed under CC BY 2.0
  20. 20. Road ahead Formalising formative assessment “Studying” by Scott Akerman is licensed under CC BY 2.0
  21. 21. Thank you… …for your attention! Correspondence about this presentation to: torstein.lag@uit.no

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