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Are Successful Women Shunned, while Her Male Counterparts are Celebrated
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Are Successful Women Shunned, while Her Male Counterparts are Celebrated

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Just when we start to see cracks in that glass ceiling, there is a new one being designed. Studies show that powerful and successful women are perceived are more likely to be hated, than her male ...

Just when we start to see cracks in that glass ceiling, there is a new one being designed. Studies show that powerful and successful women are perceived are more likely to be hated, than her male counterparts. The position of power, worn by women, is perceived to be self-serving, getting ahead, and vicious. On the other hand, her male counterparts are seen as confident and focused. “Women are being judged more, even by other women,” said Valerie Young, Ed.D., author of The Secret Thoughts of Successful Women. She goes on to state that, “While male leaders are allowed to have complex personalities, powerful women are often summed up by hackneyed stereotypes that undermine them and their power.” What is our collective responsibility in addressing these stereotypes? How do women treat each other in powerful positions? What role do women play in changing these stereotypes? DO NOT miss this seminar!
Learning Objective: Increase cultural awareness and professional competence
Outcomes: At the end of this seminar, participants will be able to:
a. Examine image and communication strategies to overcome stereotypes
b. Identify ways to build more cohesive work relationships
c. Identify strategies to engage in difficult conversations about stereotypes
d. Explore situational leadership strategies that cut through barriers

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  • What is our collective responsibility in addressing these stereotypes?
  • While it is possible to develop these traits in any individual, regardless of gender,
  • Examine image and communication strategies to overcome stereotypes.
  • By building relationships with diverse others Forming positive relationship with diverse othersSeeking feedback from diverse others about how well one is communicating respect for them and valuing their diversityTreating diverse others as invited guests by showing interest in them rather than treating them as strangers
  • Explore situational leadership strategies that cut through barriers.Women are also better at conflict management, have better listening skills and show more tolerance and empathy. While men and women do have different leadership styles, that should not mean that one is dominant over the other. It has been observed that the differences we see in leadership style are partly due to the way men view leadership as leading, while women see leadership as facilitating (Growe & Montgomery, 2000). In contrast to the characteristics of women given above, men lead from the front and attempt to have all the answers while stressing task accomplishment,
  • This happen too often even when it is the same as his.
  • Make the team’s purposes clear. Define each person’sjob in terms of its contribution to the group’s and the company’s overallgoals.
  • However, each of us brings a lifetime of experiences and cultural histories that create in us certain “schemas” or non-conscious hypotheses (expectations or stereotypes) that affect our judgments of others. Schemas allow efficient, yet sometimes inaccurate, processing of information. They are unintentional, automatic and outside of our awareness. Our schemas can even conflict with our conscious or “explicit” attitudes. We perceive and treat people based on the schemas wct our judgments of others. Schemas allow efficient, yet sometimes inaccurate, processing of information. They are unintentional, automatic and outside of our awareness. Our schemas can even conflict with our conscious or “explicit” attitudes. We perceive and treat people based on the schemas we hold regarding theirphysical and social categories. Unconscious bias results from the schemas that exist in our understanding. Unconscious bias affects us all, regardless of gender, race, sexual orientation, ability, etc. A significant limiting factor in our selection and advancement processes and our desire to achieve a more diverse workforce may well be our inability to acknowledge the existence and impact of unconscious biases. The good news is that our schemas and the biases that result from them can change based on experience or exposure to new information.
  • How does my unmentioned expectations influence my unconscious biases? Do we hold people accountable unknowingly….? How can we Talk about Difference in Discussion while Disagreeing without being Disrespectful. You didn't’ say… what didn't’t know you thought!!!
  • In psychology and cognitive science, a schema (plural schemata or schemas), describes an organized pattern of thought or behavior. It can also be described as a mental structure of preconceived ideas, a framework representing some aspect of the world, or a system of organizing and perceiving new information. Schemata influence attention and the absorption of new knowledge: people are more likely to notice things that fit into their schema, while re-interpreting contradictions to the schema as exceptions or distorting them to fit. Schemata have a tendency to remain unchanged, even in the face of contradictory information. Schemata can help in understanding the world. Most situations do not require effortful thought when using schema, since automatic thought is all that is required. People can organize new perceptions into schemata quickly.[1]People use schemata to organize current knowledge and provide a framework for future understanding. Examples of schemata include academic rubrics, social schemas, stereotypes, social roles, scripts, worldviews, and archetypes. In Piaget's theory of development, children adopt a series of schemata to understand the world.

Are Successful Women Shunned, while Her Male Counterparts are Celebrated Are Successful Women Shunned, while Her Male Counterparts are Celebrated Presentation Transcript

  • October 17–19, 2013 ARE SUCCESSFUL WOMEN SHUNNED, WHILE HER MALE COUNTERPARTS ARE CELEBRATED? Situational Leadership Strategies to Overcome Stereotypes and Barriers
  • Lists the traits • • • • • • • Commonly associated with leadership as? Effective communication Skills, task completion, Responsibility, problem solving, Originality, decision making, action taking, Vision, self awareness, Confidence, Experience and Power.
  • Avoiding Common Communication Mistakes(or) Managing Communication and Diversity Read, listen, and broaden experiences with diverse people • Communicate effectively by listening attentively and asking questions about what one did not understand • Avoid terms that spotlight certain groups and imply the individual is an exception • Avoid valuing one’s message based on dress, mannerisms, accent, or eye contact
  • By reducing prejudices and use of stereotypes you can: • Recognize that diversity exists and learn to value and respect fundamental differences • Admit to one’s own biases and prejudices and committ to reduce them • Dismiss myths about others when in a group of friends or associates
  • Observations of Leadership styles • For instance, some women portray a more participatory approach, and some women are more democratic, • Allow for power and information sharing • Some women are more sensitive, some are more nurturing than men, focus on relationships • Enable others to make contributions through delegation
  • Observations of Leadership styles • While some men and women do have different leadership styles, that should not mean that one is dominant over the other. • It has been observed that the differences we see in leadership style are partly due to the way some men view leadership as leading, while some women see leadership as facilitating
  • Communicate Our Bias Thru Words • How do women treat each other in powerful positions? • How and why do some women compete against one another?
  • Communicate Our Bias Thru Words • He’s • Assertive • Lost his cool’ , implying it was an aberration • Headstrong • She’s • Aggressive, or `hostile'. • Emotional' or `Menopausal Thus, her behavior is devalued, • Opinionated
  • Here are ways to build more cohesive work relationships • Clarify the common goals and purposes • Clarify each person’s role in achieving the common purpose. • Put team members in touch with the people who use what they do. • Pay attention to conflicts when they arise.
  • Unconscious Bias, Attitudes, • Strange as it sounds, behaviors --- such as succeeding -- are sometimes considered attractive in men but not in women. Third, there is something about our culture's view of male-dominated such as the STEM fields that causes female aspirants to be considered unattractive. Do we treat people according to their appearance.
  • What are our filters? • When we are put in the position of evaluating others, we like to think that we will handle that responsibility professionally and objectively—that we will judge people based solely on their credentials and achievements.
  • • The good news is that our schemas and the biases that result from them can change based on experience or exposure to new information.
  • • Work out ways to resolve conflicts. • Remember your leadership role • Make sure team members interact at meeting • Allow team members to have input into their jobs
  • Alexander Evans © ™ Principal 4Mankind LLC Alexander.evans@4mankind.net www.4mankind.net