Waves of Innovation:Using Google Wave in the ESL Classroom<br />TESOL Convention Boston 2010<br />25 March 2010<br />David...
http://www.slaw.ca/wp-content/uploads/2009/10/pearls_before_swine.gif<br />
May 28, 2009<br />The day that Wave was announced to the public…<br />
http://www.theatlantic.com/business/archive/2009/05/how-the-new-google-wave-will-change-emailing-blogging-your-life/18476/...
http://www.telegraph.co.uk/technology/google/5401007/Google-Wave-aims-to-transform-online-communication.html<br />
http://www.forbes.com/2009/05/28/google-wave-email-technology-paidcontent.html<br />
http://www.infoworld.com/t/software-service/google-wave-twitter-killer-357<br />
http://www.internetnews.com/webcontent/print.php/3822576<br />
http://www.networkworld.com/news/2009/052909-google-wave-a-new-kind.html?page=1<br />
Problem: invites<br />
Problem: invites<br />http://static.toondoo.com/public/m/e/e/meerasapra/toons/cool-cartoon-1025998.png<br />
http://taobaofieldguide.com/wp-content/uploads/2009/11/wave-invites-on-taobao-china.png<br />
(~$300)<br />http://www.davidnaylor.co.uk/wordpress/wp-content/uploads/2009/09/google-wave.JPG<br />
http://www.csmonitor.com/var/ezflow_site/storage/images/media/images/2009/0930/google-wave-invite-hits-ebay-price-soars/ar...
After the invite…<br />
After the invite…<br />http://cultureandcommunication.org/f09/tdm/wp-content/uploads/2009/11/cool-cartoon-10024551.png<br />
http://www.infoworld.com/d/applications/google-wave-its-innovative-it-truly-useful-322<br />
http://www.startribune.com/business/69436017.html?elr=KArksc8P:Pc:U0ckkD:aEyKUiD3aPc:_Yyc:aUU<br />
http://scobleizer.com/2009/10/01/google-wave-crashes-on-beach-of-overhype/<br />
So what does it all mean?<br />For ESL teachers?<br />No definitive answers here…<br />We hope to give you a better idea<b...
Some assumptions<br /><ul><li>Assumption #1:
Since you're here, you're already interested in implementing technology into your classroom.
You've already "bought the product" (technology)...or are willing to try to do so.</li></li></ul><li>Some assumptions<br /...
Since Wave is not even officially a "Beta" yet, just a "Preview", the product is not as user-friendly as it will (assuming...
Only videos</li></li></ul><li>A request<br />http://student.ccbcmd.edu/elmo/cmsc202/lecture2.gif<br />http://www.co-huds.c...
Overview<br /><ul><li>(We’ve already given you) Background
Wave: an overview
Features of Wave, with pedagogical implications
CALL justification
Strengths and weaknesses</li></li></ul><li>Wave overview<br />
Why make Wave at all?<br />http://cultureandcommunication.org/f09/tdm/wp-content/uploads/2009/11/cool-cartoon-8040771.png<...
Why make Wave at all?<br />http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=rDu2A3WzQpo<br />
What is it?<br />Google's official description:<br />A wave is equal parts conversation and document. People can communica...
What is it?<br />A wave is shared. Any participant can reply anywhere in the message, edit the content and add participant...
What is it?<br />A wave is live. With live transmission as you type, participants on a wave can have faster conversations,...
Introducing…<br />Lars, Stephanie, Jens…and others<br />Engineers overseeing the Wave project<br />At the Google I/O Devel...
Wave is like email<br />
Wave is like email<br />
Wave is like instant messaging<br />
Wave is like instant messaging<br />
Technical overview<br />Wave is an open-source protocol.<br />Currently only executed by Google.<br />Designed to be taken...
Features…<br />and uses in the classroom<br />
Multiple people editing<br />
Multiple people editing<br />
Collaborative notes<br />
Collaborative notes<br />
Collaborative notes: worksheet<br />
Collaborative notes: worksheet<br />
Playback<br />
Playback<br />
Spell-checker<br />
Spell-checker<br />
Attachments<br />
Attachments<br />
Gadgets: yes/no/maybe<br />
Gadgets: yes/no/maybe<br />
Gadgets: like/dislike<br />
Translation: Aunt Rosy…etta<br />
Translation: Aunt Rosy…etta<br />
Google search<br />
Google search<br />
Gadgets: mindmap<br />
Gadgets: napkin<br />
Gadgets: games: Colcrop<br />
Uses in class<br />Debate<br />http://www.guardian.co.uk/environment/blog/2009/dec/15/copenhagen-google-wave-youth-panel<b...
Uses in class<br /><ul><li>Helping each other study…for exams, etc.
Vocabulary with definitions, examples, etc.
Collaborative notes
Integration with Google Groups</li></li></ul><li>Uses outside of class<br /><ul><li>Games
Word games?
Language use through other types of games?
(If they actually use English!)</li></li></ul><li>Uses outside of class<br /><ul><li>Video chat/practicing speaking
Gadget
Office hours
Online writing lab</li></li></ul><li>Uses outside of class<br />Non-teaching use—collaboration with colleagues<br />Arrang...
Uses outside of class:departmental use?<br />http://www.hotelsmag.com/article/451151-Hotel_Rides_Google_s_Wave.php<br />
Classroom use: a reality check<br /><ul><li>Potentially challenging implementation process: invitation, sign-up, verification
Technical issues: 
Wave doesn't play well with IE
…so far
(Firefox, Chrome and Safari are fine.)
Problems with the university computer system</li></li></ul><li>Classroom use: a reality check<br /><ul><li>So: check with ...
Ask students to bring their own laptops</li></li></ul><li>Theoretical justification<br />
Why CALL?<br /><ul><li>Reality</li></ul>Much of our reading, writing and communicating is migrating from other environment...
Why CALL?<br />Critical thinking skills<br />Use of computer technology in classrooms is generally reported to improve:<br...
Why technology in the language class?<br />1. Instant feedback and response<br />2. Removing the barriers of time and dist...
1. Constructing knowledge collaboratively<br /><ul><li>Social constructivism promotes the idea that in order to learn some...
1. Constructing knowledge collaboratively<br /><ul><li>Students can share their knowledge, observe learning processes of o...
2. Forming knowledge by mediating artifacts<br />Language is the most  important artifact human beings have developed. Mea...
3. Building knowledge through argumentation and meaning making<br />Learning is  an argumentative process that happens  am...
Google Wave<br /><ul><li>Wave utilizes some of the elements fundamental to a successful communication:</li></ul>a virtual ...
Strengths and Weaknesses<br />
Strengths of Wave<br />Excellent tool for collaboration<br />Cooperative teams achieve higher levels of thought and retain...
Strengths of Wave<br />Promotes close reading, revision, and tracking of preliminary work<br />Discourages product oriente...
Strengths of Wave<br />Playback mode allows the participants to see a wave develop. <br />Participants can see who contrib...
Strengths of Wave<br /><ul><li>Caters for differences in learning styles in the classroom</li></ul>Some might be less comf...
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Waves of Innovation: Using Google Wave in the ESL Classroom

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Part of the 2010 TESOL Annual Convention and Exhibition.

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  • Hi.

    There are quite a few differences between Wiki and Waves.

    Perhaps one of the most significant differences is that the interaction (in Wave) is instantaneous. I've done some work on wikis before which was quite frustrating. I would (perhaps unwisely) go for long periods of time making revisions on a document without saving. Then I would try to save and the site wouldn't let me, since someone else had been editing at the same time. That doesn't happen in Wave. You get better interaction as a result.

    Additionally, there are lots of add-ons that increase the quality of interaction within the Wave. You don't get those gadgets in a wiki.

    One very cool part of a Wave is the playback feature. You can look back at how the interaction has occurred to see the development of the ideas. Additionally, if you're the administrator of the Wave, you can reset the Wave to a previous point, which is nice.

    One new thing about Wave is that it is now available without needing an invitation. Simply go to wave.google.com to sign in!

    Thoughts? Reactions?
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  • Very Informative!!! Thank you!!!
    But didn't get the difference between Wiki and Google Wave.
       Reply 
    Are you sure you want to  Yes  No
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Waves of Innovation: Using Google Wave in the ESL Classroom

  1. 1. Waves of Innovation:Using Google Wave in the ESL Classroom<br />TESOL Convention Boston 2010<br />25 March 2010<br />David Bartsch<br />Ozgur Pala<br />Marie Daniel<br />
  2. 2.
  3. 3.
  4. 4. http://www.slaw.ca/wp-content/uploads/2009/10/pearls_before_swine.gif<br />
  5. 5. May 28, 2009<br />The day that Wave was announced to the public…<br />
  6. 6. http://www.theatlantic.com/business/archive/2009/05/how-the-new-google-wave-will-change-emailing-blogging-your-life/18476/<br />
  7. 7. http://www.telegraph.co.uk/technology/google/5401007/Google-Wave-aims-to-transform-online-communication.html<br />
  8. 8. http://www.forbes.com/2009/05/28/google-wave-email-technology-paidcontent.html<br />
  9. 9. http://www.infoworld.com/t/software-service/google-wave-twitter-killer-357<br />
  10. 10. http://www.internetnews.com/webcontent/print.php/3822576<br />
  11. 11. http://www.networkworld.com/news/2009/052909-google-wave-a-new-kind.html?page=1<br />
  12. 12. Problem: invites<br />
  13. 13. Problem: invites<br />http://static.toondoo.com/public/m/e/e/meerasapra/toons/cool-cartoon-1025998.png<br />
  14. 14. http://taobaofieldguide.com/wp-content/uploads/2009/11/wave-invites-on-taobao-china.png<br />
  15. 15. (~$300)<br />http://www.davidnaylor.co.uk/wordpress/wp-content/uploads/2009/09/google-wave.JPG<br />
  16. 16. http://www.csmonitor.com/var/ezflow_site/storage/images/media/images/2009/0930/google-wave-invite-hits-ebay-price-soars/article_photo1.jpg/6824450-1-eng-US/article_photo1.jpg_full_600.jpg<br />
  17. 17. After the invite…<br />
  18. 18. After the invite…<br />http://cultureandcommunication.org/f09/tdm/wp-content/uploads/2009/11/cool-cartoon-10024551.png<br />
  19. 19. http://www.infoworld.com/d/applications/google-wave-its-innovative-it-truly-useful-322<br />
  20. 20. http://www.startribune.com/business/69436017.html?elr=KArksc8P:Pc:U0ckkD:aEyKUiD3aPc:_Yyc:aUU<br />
  21. 21. http://scobleizer.com/2009/10/01/google-wave-crashes-on-beach-of-overhype/<br />
  22. 22. So what does it all mean?<br />For ESL teachers?<br />No definitive answers here…<br />We hope to give you a better idea<br />What Wave is<br />How you might consider using it<br />
  23. 23. Some assumptions<br /><ul><li>Assumption #1:
  24. 24. Since you're here, you're already interested in implementing technology into your classroom.
  25. 25. You've already "bought the product" (technology)...or are willing to try to do so.</li></li></ul><li>Some assumptions<br /><ul><li>Assumption #2: You've already heard a little bit about Wave. You're intrigued.</li></li></ul><li>Some assumptions<br /><ul><li>Assumption #3: You're moderately comfortable with technology. 
  26. 26. Since Wave is not even officially a "Beta" yet, just a "Preview", the product is not as user-friendly as it will (assumingly) become. (If you don't know what a "Beta" is, that says something right there!)</li></li></ul><li>Unfortunately…<br /><ul><li>No live Wave here
  27. 27. Only videos</li></li></ul><li>A request<br />http://student.ccbcmd.edu/elmo/cmsc202/lecture2.gif<br />http://www.co-huds.com/sitebuilder/images/ClipartQuestionGuy-175x210.jpg<br />
  28. 28. Overview<br /><ul><li>(We’ve already given you) Background
  29. 29. Wave: an overview
  30. 30. Features of Wave, with pedagogical implications
  31. 31. CALL justification
  32. 32. Strengths and weaknesses</li></li></ul><li>Wave overview<br />
  33. 33. Why make Wave at all?<br />http://cultureandcommunication.org/f09/tdm/wp-content/uploads/2009/11/cool-cartoon-8040771.png<br />
  34. 34. Why make Wave at all?<br />http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=rDu2A3WzQpo<br />
  35. 35. What is it?<br />Google's official description:<br />A wave is equal parts conversation and document. People can communicate and work together with richly formatted text, photos, videos, maps, and more. <br />
  36. 36. What is it?<br />A wave is shared. Any participant can reply anywhere in the message, edit the content and add participants at any point in the process. Then playback lets anyone rewind the wave to see who said what and when.<br />
  37. 37. What is it?<br />A wave is live. With live transmission as you type, participants on a wave can have faster conversations, see edits and interact with extensions in real-time. <br />http://wave.google.com/about.html <br />
  38. 38. Introducing…<br />Lars, Stephanie, Jens…and others<br />Engineers overseeing the Wave project<br />At the Google I/O Developers’ Conference, May 28, 2009<br />Some techie lingo…<br />Edited from video at: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=v_UyVmITiYQ<br />
  39. 39. Wave is like email<br />
  40. 40. Wave is like email<br />
  41. 41. Wave is like instant messaging<br />
  42. 42. Wave is like instant messaging<br />
  43. 43. Technical overview<br />Wave is an open-source protocol.<br />Currently only executed by Google.<br />Designed to be taken on by other companies and expanded.<br />
  44. 44. Features…<br />and uses in the classroom<br />
  45. 45. Multiple people editing<br />
  46. 46. Multiple people editing<br />
  47. 47. Collaborative notes<br />
  48. 48. Collaborative notes<br />
  49. 49. Collaborative notes: worksheet<br />
  50. 50. Collaborative notes: worksheet<br />
  51. 51. Playback<br />
  52. 52. Playback<br />
  53. 53. Spell-checker<br />
  54. 54. Spell-checker<br />
  55. 55. Attachments<br />
  56. 56. Attachments<br />
  57. 57. Gadgets: yes/no/maybe<br />
  58. 58. Gadgets: yes/no/maybe<br />
  59. 59. Gadgets: like/dislike<br />
  60. 60. Translation: Aunt Rosy…etta<br />
  61. 61. Translation: Aunt Rosy…etta<br />
  62. 62. Google search<br />
  63. 63. Google search<br />
  64. 64. Gadgets: mindmap<br />
  65. 65. Gadgets: napkin<br />
  66. 66. Gadgets: games: Colcrop<br />
  67. 67. Uses in class<br />Debate<br />http://www.guardian.co.uk/environment/blog/2009/dec/15/copenhagen-google-wave-youth-panel<br />
  68. 68. Uses in class<br /><ul><li>Helping each other study…for exams, etc.
  69. 69. Vocabulary with definitions, examples, etc.
  70. 70. Collaborative notes
  71. 71. Integration with Google Groups</li></li></ul><li>Uses outside of class<br /><ul><li>Games
  72. 72. Word games?
  73. 73. Language use through other types of games?
  74. 74. (If they actually use English!)</li></li></ul><li>Uses outside of class<br /><ul><li>Video chat/practicing speaking
  75. 75. Gadget
  76. 76. Office hours
  77. 77. Online writing lab</li></li></ul><li>Uses outside of class<br />Non-teaching use—collaboration with colleagues<br />Arranging meetings (yes, there’s a gadget for that)<br />Creating documents<br />Public waves<br />Use of Wave<br />General “best practices”<br />
  78. 78. Uses outside of class:departmental use?<br />http://www.hotelsmag.com/article/451151-Hotel_Rides_Google_s_Wave.php<br />
  79. 79. Classroom use: a reality check<br /><ul><li>Potentially challenging implementation process: invitation, sign-up, verification
  80. 80. Technical issues: 
  81. 81. Wave doesn't play well with IE
  82. 82. …so far
  83. 83. (Firefox, Chrome and Safari are fine.)
  84. 84. Problems with the university computer system</li></li></ul><li>Classroom use: a reality check<br /><ul><li>So: check with your system administrator before making any grand plans
  85. 85. Ask students to bring their own laptops</li></li></ul><li>Theoretical justification<br />
  86. 86. Why CALL?<br /><ul><li>Reality</li></ul>Much of our reading, writing and communicating is migrating from other environments (print, telephone, etc.) to the screen. <br /><ul><li>Motivation</li></ul>Affective benefit from student’s perspective<br /><ul><li>Adapting learning to the student</li></ul>Pace of learning and making choices on the way<br /><ul><li>Authenticity </li></ul>Students think that they are a part of a real community rather than students in class. This removes much of the affective filters<br />
  87. 87. Why CALL?<br />Critical thinking skills<br />Use of computer technology in classrooms is generally reported to improve:<br />more student-centered learning and engagement, <br />more active processing resulting in higher-order thinking,<br />more confidence in directing students’ own learning.<br /> (Noemi: Retrieved October, 2009.)<br />
  88. 88. Why technology in the language class?<br />1. Instant feedback and response<br />2. Removing the barriers of time and distance in communication, to a large extent<br />3. Ability and capacity to integrate a variety of different means of communication <br />Wegerif (2005:6)<br /><ul><li>Google Wave meets these criteria and with quite a success for a Beta version. </li></li></ul><li>Theoretical Basis: Social Constructivism <br />Wave can be considered as a superior educational tool because it entails: <br />1. Constructing knowledge collaboratively<br />2. Forming knowledge by mediating artifacts<br />3. Building knowledge through argumentation and meaning making<br /> (Saljo, 2005)<br />
  89. 89. 1. Constructing knowledge collaboratively<br /><ul><li>Social constructivism promotes the idea that in order to learn something participants must be actively involved in the social practices whereby communication and learning occur.</li></ul>(Petraglia, 1998)<br /><ul><li>Learning is a social process. Meaning is constructed rather than conveyed passively. </li></ul>(Koschman, 1996)<br />
  90. 90. 1. Constructing knowledge collaboratively<br /><ul><li>Students can share their knowledge, observe learning processes of others and communicate their thoughts to an audience.</li></ul>(Petraglia, 1998)<br /><ul><li>Computers can’t replace the knowledge building between teachers and students, but it can support and be a resource for co-learning.</li></ul>(Suthers, 2005)<br />
  91. 91. 2. Forming knowledge by mediating artifacts<br />Language is the most important artifact human beings have developed. Meaning and knowledge are created and conveyed through the medium of language. Isn’t language learning playing with the language and forming knowledge in new ways? <br />
  92. 92. 3. Building knowledge through argumentation and meaning making<br />Learning is an argumentative process that happens among participants who want to make meaning of what others say and what they themselves want to say. <br />It is intentional and it involves transferring what is learned to new situations.<br />
  93. 93. Google Wave<br /><ul><li>Wave utilizes some of the elements fundamental to a successful communication:</li></ul>a virtual presence, <br />a variety of interactions, <br />easy participation, <br />valuable content, <br />connections to a broader subject field, <br />personal and community identity and interaction, <br />democratic participation, <br />evolution over time<br />(Schwartz, Clark, Cossarin, & Rudolph, 2004)<br />
  94. 94. Strengths and Weaknesses<br />
  95. 95. Strengths of Wave<br />Excellent tool for collaboration<br />Cooperative teams achieve higher levels of thought and retain information longer than students who do their work individually (Johnson and Johnson, 1986). <br />
  96. 96. Strengths of Wave<br />Promotes close reading, revision, and tracking of preliminary work<br />Discourages product oriented writing while facilitating writing as a process<br />• Ease students into writing/speaking for a wider audience and encourages multiple perspectives and solutions<br />
  97. 97. Strengths of Wave<br />Playback mode allows the participants to see a wave develop. <br />Participants can see who contributed how much, and what<br />Playback also allows each participant to be able to go back and reflect upon their own production.<br />Participants can focus more on the actual task rather than the structure and the storage of the content.<br />
  98. 98. Strengths of Wave<br /><ul><li>Caters for differences in learning styles in the classroom</li></ul>Some might be less comfortable speaking in class, but participating online might be easier.<br />Instant translation<br /><ul><li>Instant translation gadget could hinder meaningful communication 
  99. 99. Corpus-based spelling correction</li></li></ul><li>Weaknesses of Wave<br />Lack of ability to limit permission to use certain editing rights<br />Attributing different rights to each participant would be useful/vital in situations where digressions would disrupt the flow of the topic of the wave in question<br />This drawback could also result in extremely “noisy” waves that may inhibit participants to focus on important messages. <br />
  100. 100. Weaknesses of Wave<br />It is impossible to finish a wave.<br />You can ‘mute’ a wave that you no longer want to participate in, but this wave may live far beyond the point the initiator meant it to be.<br />
  101. 101. Weaknesses of Wave<br /><ul><li>Decent typing speed?
  102. 102. Difficult to assess student participation and learning outcomes. A lot of work needs to be done for effective and fair assessment</li></li></ul><li>Needed: time<br /><ul><li>Google and developers to create and augment the program
  103. 103. Google is showing evidence that it will integrate Wave with Docs and possibly other products, such as spreadsheets and presentation applications (according to the initial product demo video)
  104. 104. Users to create best practices</li></li></ul><li>Predictions<br />The social functionality of Wave may bring in a new CALL paradigm.<br />Wave is going to help move learners from controlled learning environments to more flexible and interactive modes of learning.<br />—Jane Hart, social learning consultant at Centre for Learning & Performance Technologies<br />Retrieved on February 14, 2010 from http://www.internettime.com/2010/01/elearn-magazines-2010-predicitions/<br />
  105. 105. Predictions: the upshot<br /><ul><li>Try it.
  106. 106. See if you like it.
  107. 107. See if your students like it.
  108. 108. See if your students learn while using it!
  109. 109. Make a decision based on the results.</li></li></ul><li>Sounds great...how do I get an invite?<br /><ul><li>Ask Google...nicely.
  110. 110. https://services.google.com/fb/forms/wavesignup/
  111. 111. (This address is printed on the handout.)
  112. 112. Scour the web.
  113. 113. We have a few invitations left...
  114. 114. Email us at the addresses on your sheet.</li></li></ul><li>I have the invite. What next?<br />Sign in/create a Google account (by following the links in the invitation).<br />Go to http://wave.google.com.<br />Start Waving<br />To learn basic functions, check out http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=p6pgxLaDdQw<br />(This link is printed on the handout.)<br />
  115. 115. How do I get a copy of the slideshow?<br />Go to http://youtubeforwriting.blogspot.com<br />Printed on your handout.<br />Go to the TESOL’s event at www.slideshare.com<br />Search for “2010 TESOL Annual Convention and Exhibition”<br />Username “bartsch”<br />
  116. 116. To contact us...<br />  <br />David Bartsch<br />david.bartsch@qu.edu.qa   <br />Ozgur Pala<br />ozgur.pala@qu.edu.qa<br />Marie Daniel<br />danielma@champaignschools.org <br />
  117. 117. References<br /><ul><li>Domingo, Noemi. “Computer Assisted Language Learning: Increase of Freedom or Submission to Machines?” Retrieved March 3, 2010 from http://www.terra.es/personal/nostat.)
  118. 118. Hane, Johanna. “Google Wave: A Revolutionary CSCL-tool or an overestimated hype?”. Retrieved on February 15 from http://api.ning.com/files/B5shNxqW8YXUvWZrR7VvQ9GVEFxzU-V5WRZtzoP16y3NrNzNamNaNXXdL5MZo9d3BUR-9a9vwSs5kiwFJ2H8rhnxWb*uKc4q/GoogleWavearevolutionaryCSCLtooloranoverestimatedhype.pdf.
  119. 119. Koschman, Timmothy, ed. “CSCL: Theory and practice of an emerging paradigm”. Mahwah, NJ: Erlbaum, 1996.
  120. 120. Petraglia, Joseph. “Reality by Design – The Rhetoric and Technology of Authenticity in Education”. Manwah, NJ: Lawrence Erlbaum, 1998. </li></li></ul><li>References<br /><ul><li>Saljo, 2005, cited in Hane.
  121. 121. Schwartz, Linda; Clark, Sharon; Cossarin, Mary & Rudolph, Jim. (2004) “Educational Wikis: Features and selection criteria”. International Review of Research in Open and Distance Learning, 5:1, April, 2004.
  122. 122. Suthers, Daniel. “Technology Affordances for Intersubjective Meaning-Making”. Frontiers in Artificial Inelligence and Applications; Vol. 151, 2005.
  123. 123. Wegerif (2005:6) “Towards a Dialogic understanding of the relationship between CsCl and teaching thinking skills”. (2005) Retrieved from http://portal.acm.org/citation.cfm?id=1149386 on March 1, 2010.</li>

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