Designing and using group software through patterns

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  • 1 st Is mostly outside of our control – more of a structural problem 2 nd Simple collaborative tools for different disciplines whatever is necessary. 3 rd a little more explanation
  • Join group / leave group
  • 1 st Is mostly outside of our control – more of a structural problem 2 nd Simple collaborative tools for different disciplines whatever is necessary. 3 rd a little more explanation
  • Talk more about why I think Patterns are so cool, and needed.
  • Designing and using group software through patterns

    1. 1. Our Agenda <ul><li>Who am I?
    2. 2. Demo of island.byu.edu
    3. 3. Design principles of island.byu.edu
    4. 4. Problems of designing / using group software
    5. 5. Why patterns rock. </li></ul>
    6. 6. Who am I? <ul><li>Soon-to-graduate student in the Masters of Information Systems Management degree @ BYU
    7. 7. Entrepreneur, founder of Edully – Social Learning Platform provider
    8. 8. Passion is helping organizations work and learn – together and better.
    9. 9. Blog = http://kyle.mathews2000.com/blog
    10. 10. Twitter = http://twitter.com/kylemathews </li></ul>
    11. 11. Edully Design Goals <ul><li>Move control and responsibility for learning to the learners.
    12. 12. Provide collaborative learning tools to classrooms and other formal learning communities
    13. 13. Serve as scaffolding for growing a diverse ecology of informal learning communities.
    14. 14. Facilitate conversations (not content delivery) </li></ul>
    15. 15. Demo <ul><li>Create discussion (through web + email)
    16. 16. Create group
    17. 17. Join group / leave group
    18. 18. Create image gallery </li></ul>
    19. 19. Edully Design Goals <ul><li>Move control and responsibility for learning to the learners.
    20. 20. Provide collaborative learning tools to classrooms and other formal learning communities
    21. 21. Serve as scaffolding for growing a diverse ecology of informal learning communities.
    22. 22. Facilitate conversations (not content delivery) </li></ul>
    23. 23. Learning Ecologies <ul><li>Ecology as an open system, dynamic and interdependent, diverse, partially self organizing, adaptive, and fragile. This concept is then extended to include the following characteristics of a learning ecology: </li><ul><li>A collection of overlapping communities of interest
    24. 24. Cross pollinating with each other
    25. 25. Constantly evolving
    26. 26. Largely self organizing </li></ul><li>See https://island.byu.edu/group/information-systems 30% of group members are alumni </li></ul>
    27. 27. Micro-labs <ul><li>” These highly networked micro labs [are] focused on topics of deep inquiry... A team of participants with the necessary skills might be distributed among several institutions, several countries, networked digitally and through ongoing academic relationships...Because they are networked, a single micro-lab’s reach extends beyond the team itself or the duration of a specific project. When the opportunity arises, these micro-labs can coalesce into one larger lab with tremendous diversity and richness of talent. Breaking apart again, they may redistribute talent and resources. Analogous to the way 'process networks' mobilize highly specialized small companies across an extended integrated design and manufacturing process, a network of micro-labs creates a horizontal rhizomic structure in which the whole is much greater than the sum of the parts. The networked micro-lab can adapt to new questions and opportunities from outside as well as inside the network. ”
    28. 28. – Pendleton-Jullian, A. (2009). Design Education and Innovation Ecotones </li></ul>
    29. 29. Designing Social Software <ul><li>A tricky problem </li></ul>
    30. 30. Who are we optimizing for? <ul><li>Conflict between needs of group + individual
    31. 31. ”Optimizing the outcome for a subsystem will in general not optimize the outcome for the system as a whole.” http://pespmc1.vub.ac.be/suboptim.html
    32. 32. Tragedy of the commons </li></ul>
    33. 33. Groups > individuals <ul><li>”Richard Light discovered that one of the strongest determinants of students’ success in higher education...was their ability to form or participate in small study groups. Students who studied in groups...were more engaged in their studies, were better prepared for class, and learned significantly more than students who worked on their own.”
    34. 34. – ” Minds on Fire” John Seely Brown and Richard P. Adler </li></ul>
    35. 35. Group software <ul><li>Shift from designing for human-computer interactions to designing human-computer-human interactions
    36. 36. ”Most of the important work in social software has been technically simple but socially complex”
    37. 37. – Clay Shirky ”Group as User: Flaming and the Design of Social Software” </li></ul>
    38. 38. <ul><li>Back to learning </li></ul>
    39. 39. The problem <ul>Of Designing an effective learning classroom. <li>Teachers (generally speaking) don't fully understand problem of teaching.
    40. 40. This problem is made worse by introducing social media into the classroom. </li></ul>
    41. 41. Understanding problems hard <ul><li>”Today functional problems are becoming less simple all the time. But designers rarely confess their ability to solve them. Instead, when a designer does not understand a problem clearly enough to find the order it really calls for, he falls back on some arbitrarily chosen formal order. The problem, because of its complexity, remains unsolved.
    42. 42. – Christopher Alexander, ”Notes on the Synthesis of Form” </li></ul>
    43. 43. Combating complexity <ul><li>. . . with patterns </li></ul>
    44. 44. Understanding the problem <ul><li>Patterns bridge gap between context, problem, and solution in easily understood way.
    45. 45. Common solutions for common problems
    46. 46. Catalog best practices from best teachers </li></ul>
    47. 47. Share our knowledge <ul>I write patterns for sub-problems I understand <li>You can write patterns for sub-problems you understand
    48. 48. Then we can assemble patterns written by community and design much more effective learning enviornments for our students. </li></ul>
    49. 49. Resources <ul><li>” Here Comes Everyone” by Clay Shirky http://www.amazon.com/Here-Comes-Everybody-Organizing-Organizations/dp/1594201536
    50. 50. ” Linked: How Everything Is Connected to Everything Else and What It Means&quot; by Albert-Laszlo Barabasi Excellent intro to science of networks
    51. 51. Introduction to using patterns in web design – http://37signals.com/papers/introtopatterns/
    52. 52. ” Designing for Social Traction” – http://bokardo.com/archives/designing-for-social-traction-slide-deck/
    53. 53. ” Drupal for Education and E-Learning” by Bill Fitzgerald
    54. 54. ” The Art of the Community” – upcoming book by Ubuntu community manager – http://www.artofcommunityonline.org/
    55. 55. ” The Fifth Discipline: The Art & Practice of The Learning Organization” by Peter Senge
    56. 56. ” The Only Sustainable Edge: Why Business Strategy Depends on Productive Friction and Dynamic Specialization” by John Hagel and John Seely Brown
    57. 57. ” Minds on Fire: Open Education, the Long Tail, and Learning 2.0” by John Seely Brown and Richard P. Adler http://www.educause.edu/EDUCAUSE+Review/EDUCAUSEReviewMagazineVolume43/MindsonFireOpenEducationtheLon/162420
    58. 58. ” Design Innovation and Innovation Ecotones” by Ann Pendleton-Jullian http://president.asu.edu/node/705
    59. 59. ” Building Web 2.0 Reputation Systems” – http://buildingreputation.com/
    60. 60. ” Enterprise 2.0: New Collaborative Tools for Your Organization's Toughest Challenges” by Andrew McAfee
    61. 61. Social software Patterns
    62. 62. ” Designing Social Interfaces” – http://www.designingsocialinterfaces.com/patterns.wiki/index.php?title=Main_Page
    63. 63. ” Community Design Patterns” – http://www.slideshare.net/pecus/online-communities-design-patterns-255635
    64. 64. ” Social Software Pattern Language” – http://wikis.sun.com/display/ASSPL/A+Social+Software+Pattern+Language </li></ul>
    65. 65. Edully private beta <ul><li>Looking for teachers this fall
    66. 66. Install of Edully Learning Platform for your institution
    67. 67. Signup at http://edully.com </li></ul>

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