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NETWORKED CREATORS How users of social media have changed the ecology of information Lee Rainie Director – Pew Internet Pr...
2000 46% of adults use internet 5% with broadband at home 50% own a cell phone 0% connect to internet wirelessly <10% use ...
Media ecology –  then (industrial age) <ul><li>Product   Route to home   Display   Local storage </li></ul><ul><li>TV stat...
Media ecology – now (information age) <ul><li>Product   Route to home   Display   Local storage </li></ul><ul><li>  cable ...
Media ecology – now (information age) <ul><li>Product   Route to home   Display   Local storage </li></ul><ul><li>  cable ...
<ul><li>Manuel </li></ul><ul><li>Castells </li></ul><ul><li>Four cultures shaped the internet </li></ul>
Creators of online culture 1: Techno-elites Scientific method  enshrined   Openness Peer review Meritocracy
Creators of online culture 2: Hackers Stallman: “Free speech in the  computer age” Freedom to create to appropriate to red...
Creators of online culture 3: Virtual Communitarians Early Usenet  groups Horizontal free communication Primacy of self-di...
Creators of online culture 4: Entrepreneurs Netscape IPO Aug. 9, 1995 Tech know-how can generate lots of money
5 th  culture of the internet: Networked creators <ul><li>Democratized the voices in media </li></ul><ul><li>Challenged tr...
New community-building activities that online content creation enable <ul><li>Produce content that helps them expand their...
New community-building activities that online content creation enables <ul><li>Produce content that helps them expand thei...
<ul><li>Beyond Reality - Janet and  Maddie </li></ul>
 
 
Advantages to creators – conclusions of MacArthur Foundation team <ul><li>Negotiating friendship, status, identity </li></...
New community-building activities that online content creation enables <ul><li>Produce content that helps them expand thei...
Acura TSX - Car thief posse
 
<ul><li>After the internet forensics were complete, and group members were convinced they had their man, the first thing t...
Advantages to creators in posse situations <ul><li>Fact checking and transparency </li></ul><ul><li>Crowdsourcing wisdom, ...
New community-building activities that online content creation enables <ul><li>Produce content that helps them expand thei...
Karen Parles material
 
<ul><li>From Esther Schreurs: “I never met Karen personally, but found her when I really needed to find a survivor of this...
Just-in-time-just-like-me communities <ul><li>Communities of just-in-time information and support – ad hoc and “on the fly...
New community-building activities that online content creation enables <ul><li>Produce content that helps them expand thei...
Social media-sphere is the “5th estate” Week of March 30-April 5, 2009
5 th  estate publishing tastes <ul><li>Technology developments, especially activities in the social media environment </li...
Implications for libraries – 1  <ul><li>You can be a node in people’s social networks as they seek information to help the...
Implications for libraries – 2  <ul><li>You can teach new literacies </li></ul><ul><li>- graphics </li></ul><ul><li>- navi...
Implications for libraries – 3 <ul><li>Need to re-vision your role in a world where much has changed </li></ul><ul><li>- A...
Thank you! <ul><li>Lee Rainie </li></ul><ul><li>Director </li></ul><ul><li>Pew Internet & American Life Project </li></ul>...
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VALA: Networked Creators

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Bad weather and airline woes kept Lee Rainie from traveling to Melbourne, Australia this week to address the VALA – Libraries, Technology, and the Future conference. The slides for his talk and the paper on which it is built are available here. They deal with the democratization of media and the rise of user-generated content.

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  • Keynote title: The new information ecology Subject: The Director of Pew Internet and American Life Project as he summarizes recent trends in Internet use, cell- phone use and how information seekers come in different shapes and sizes. He will discuss the way technology-use affects all types of libraries: academic, public, school, and special.
  • New Media Index: http://www.journalism.org/index_report/bloggers_focus_april_fools%E2%80%99_joke_interrogation_techniques_and_outspoken_actress News Coverage Index http://www.journalism.org/index_report/pej_news_coverage_index_march_30_april_5_2009 Three major economic stories dominated traditional news media coverage of the week: an economic summit among developed nations in London that was aimed at coordinating global policies to recover from the financial meltdown; continued problems in U.S. banks that were highlighted when Federal Reserve Board Chairman Ben Bernanke spoke of his reluctant support for the 2008 bailout of investment house Bear Sterns and insurance conglomerate AIG, and the problems with the U.S. auto industry that were highlighted when the White House forced the dismissal of General Motors CEO Rick Wagoner. [1] The fourth major story for traditional media involved a shooting rampage at an immigration center in Binghamton, New York that left 13 innocent people dead and the killer dead, too. And the fifth story involved President Obama’s attempts to gain support among America’s NATO allies to provide more troops for the war in Afghanistan. Of course, the economic summit was a set-piece news event that drew the highest-ranking journalists among the broadcast networks – all of the anchors were on-scene to report events. The formality of the venue also drew news-coverage seekers to the event. Anti-globalization protestors gained a fair amount of coverage. In addition, sidebar stories to the event, such as Michelle Obama’s reputation in Europe, were part of the coverage of the news entourages who descended on London. By contrast, the blogosphere and other social media outlets could not have much cared about the summit or any of the other stories on the mainstream media list. Bloggers and other social media creators are not “on scene” and obliged to cover topics. They are distributed and more distant observers of news. This gives them more room to range over subjects and choose where they want to link and comment. The most discussed and linked-to story of this same week on the New Media Index was not even a real story – or an American story. As an April Fool’s prank, the Guardian, a British newspaper, said it would end its print edition and use the popular online communications site Twitter to draw attention to its stories. [2] While bloggers got the joke, it gained attention because some felt the phony Twitter story offered genuine insight into the huge economic and technological changes transforming the news business. The attention given this story also highlighted a trait of social media creators. They love practical jokes. Earlier in the year, the New Media Index had registered high levels of linking to a report in Foxnews.com about hackers in Texas who broke into a traffic-control room and digitally altered road sign so that it warned of a “zombie attack.” The index also had high scores for a small BBC report about a British lad who painted a 60-foot penis on the home of his parents’ house that had gone unnoticed for a year. Writing about the penis stunt, Yasha had at Heeb Magazine , an online journal that permitted user contributions, explained: “It’s these little things that make life’s hiccups – a bleak economy, climate change and missing an episode of Gossip Girl – just a bit more bearable.” Yasha said she had been sent a link to this story and that underlines one of the common traits of stories that take off among social media creators. They are passed around a lot and gain velocity after a critical mass of internet users find them funny or otherwise valuable. That same week, the second-largest story in the New Media Index questioned the effectiveness of torture as a technique for gaining intelligence information. Bloggers, especially liberals, focused on a March 29 Washington Post report that the harsh interrogation techniques used on al-Qaeda suspect Abu Zubaida yielded no useful information and gave fodder to those who opposed the use of such methods by the United States. This highlights a common element of stories that gain high levels of attention in social media: If they address hot-button issues that matter to a portion of the blogosphere, they are found and passed around quickly. Generally, those in like-minded tribes can easily share information. Often, it is well-trafficked bloggers who provide the spark for links and viral pass-arounds of stories. In this case, liberal media blogger Dan Gillmor’s favorable post on the story was one of the sparks of its eventual popularity. This same phenomenon was clearly what was happening on the fourth story most popular story of the week. It was a collection of striking pictures on Boston.com that showed buildings all over the world participating in Earth Hour 2009, an observance where people turn off lights to highlight issues of climate change, another favorite subject in the liberal quarter of the social mediasphere. The third most linked-to story of the week was a mix of Hollywood and politics. It also represented the mirror of the previous story because it was especially circulated among conservatives. Actress Angie Harmon, in an interview those who cover celebrities for Fox News, said she was tired of having to defend herself against charges of racism because she opposed President Obama. This story got a special lift among conservatives when the Sarah Palin blog cited it thusly: “Support Angie Harmon. She is smart, beautiful, talent, and not afraid to stand up for her beliefs! Angie Harmon is an endangered species – A Republican in Hollywood.” [3] Citations like this from key influencers are often the drivers that take a story into the highest reaches of the content creation world. Very few weeks in the New Media Index top five stories would be complete without a story that seized the attention of technology-focused creators. This week there was a report in the New York Times about a vast spy system that had already infiltrated computers in 103 countries. Social media creators are overrepresented among technophiles and the technologically adept. They are particularly attuned to stories about tech breakthroughs or tech problems and that interest will often drive a story to the top of the charts in the New Media Index because this cohort makes up a disproportionate share of the social media population. [1] See details of PEJ’s News Coverage Index for this week at: http://www.journalism.org/index_report/pej_news_coverage_index_march_30_april_5_2009 [2] See details of PEJ’s New Media Index for this week at: http://www.journalism.org/index_report/bloggers_focus_april_fools%E2%80%99_joke_interrogation_techniques_and_outspoken_actress [3] While it does not say anywhere, it certainly does not appear to be an official blog for Palin. See: http:// www.thesarahpalinblog.com /
  • Transcript of "VALA: Networked Creators"

    1. 1. NETWORKED CREATORS How users of social media have changed the ecology of information Lee Rainie Director – Pew Internet Project VALA Libraries Melbourne, Australia 2.10.10
    2. 2. 2000 46% of adults use internet 5% with broadband at home 50% own a cell phone 0% connect to internet wirelessly <10% use “cloud” = slow, stationary connections built around my computer The internet is the change agent Then and now 2010 75% of adults use internet 62% with broadband at home 80% own a cell phone 53% connect to internet wirelessly >two-thirds use “cloud” = fast, mobile connections built around outside servers and storage
    3. 3. Media ecology – then (industrial age) <ul><li>Product Route to home Display Local storage </li></ul><ul><li>TV stations phone TV Cassette/ 8-track </li></ul><ul><li> broadcast TV radio </li></ul><ul><li> broadcast radio stereo Vinyl album </li></ul><ul><li>News mail </li></ul><ul><li>Advertising newspaper delivery phone </li></ul><ul><li> paper </li></ul><ul><li>Radio Stations non-electronic </li></ul>Tom Wolzien, Sanford C. Bernstein & Co
    4. 4. Media ecology – now (information age) <ul><li>Product Route to home Display Local storage </li></ul><ul><li> cable TiVo (PVR) VCR </li></ul><ul><li>TV stations DSL TV Satellite radio player </li></ul><ul><li>Info wireless/phone radio DVD </li></ul><ul><li>“ Daily me” broadcast TV PC Web-based storage </li></ul><ul><li>content books iPod /MP3 server/ TiVo (PVR) </li></ul><ul><li>Cable Nets broadcast radio stereo PC </li></ul><ul><li>Web sites satellite monitor web storage/servers </li></ul><ul><li>Local news mail headphones CD/CD-ROM </li></ul><ul><li>Content from express delivery pager satellite player cell phone memory </li></ul><ul><li>individuals iPod / storage portable gamer MP3 player / iPod </li></ul><ul><li>Peer-to-peer subcarriers / WIFI cell phone pagers - PDAs </li></ul><ul><li>Advertising newspaper delivery non-electronic cable box </li></ul><ul><li>Radio stations camcorder/camera PDA/Palm game console </li></ul><ul><li>game console paper </li></ul><ul><li>Satellite radio e-reader / Kindle storage sticks/disks e-reader/Kindle </li></ul>Adapted from Tom Wolzien, Sanford C. Bernstein & Co 48% of adults own laptops – up from 30% in 2006 37% of adults own DVRs – up from 3% in 2002 18% of adults own personal gaming devices 37% of adults own game consoles 43% of adults own MP3 players – up from 11% in 2005
    5. 5. Media ecology – now (information age) <ul><li>Product Route to home Display Local storage </li></ul><ul><li> cable TiVo (PVR) VCR </li></ul><ul><li>TV stations DSL TV Satellite radio player </li></ul><ul><li>Info wireless/phone radio DVD </li></ul><ul><li>“ Daily me” broadcast TV PC Web-based storage </li></ul><ul><li>content books iPod /MP3 server/ TiVo (PVR) </li></ul><ul><li>Cable Nets broadcast radio stereo PC </li></ul><ul><li>Web sites satellite monitor web storage/servers </li></ul><ul><li>Local news mail headphones CD/CD-ROM </li></ul><ul><li>Content from express delivery pager satellite player cell phone memory </li></ul><ul><li>individuals iPod / storage portable gamer MP3 player / iPod </li></ul><ul><li>Peer-to-peer subcarriers / WIFI cell phone pagers - PDAs </li></ul><ul><li>Advertising newspaper delivery non-electronic cable box </li></ul><ul><li>Radio stations camcorder/camera PDA/Palm game console </li></ul><ul><li>game console paper </li></ul><ul><li>Satellite radio e-reader / Kindle storage sticks/disks e-reader/Kindle </li></ul>Adapted from Tom Wolzien, Sanford C. Bernstein & Co <ul><li>Networked creator universe </li></ul><ul><li>57% are social networking site users </li></ul><ul><li>37% share photos </li></ul><ul><li>30% share personal creations </li></ul><ul><li>30% contribute rankings and ratings </li></ul><ul><li>28% create content tags </li></ul><ul><li>26% post comments on sites and blogs </li></ul><ul><li>19% use Twitter / other status update features </li></ul><ul><li>15% have personal website </li></ul><ul><li>15% are content remixers </li></ul><ul><li>14% are bloggers </li></ul>
    6. 6. <ul><li>Manuel </li></ul><ul><li>Castells </li></ul><ul><li>Four cultures shaped the internet </li></ul>
    7. 7. Creators of online culture 1: Techno-elites Scientific method enshrined Openness Peer review Meritocracy
    8. 8. Creators of online culture 2: Hackers Stallman: “Free speech in the computer age” Freedom to create to appropriate to redistribute
    9. 9. Creators of online culture 3: Virtual Communitarians Early Usenet groups Horizontal free communication Primacy of self-directing networks
    10. 10. Creators of online culture 4: Entrepreneurs Netscape IPO Aug. 9, 1995 Tech know-how can generate lots of money
    11. 11. 5 th culture of the internet: Networked creators <ul><li>Democratized the voices in media </li></ul><ul><li>Challenged traditional media gatekeepers </li></ul><ul><li>Inserted themselves in “expert” affairs </li></ul><ul><li>Enhanced their civic and community roles </li></ul><ul><ul><li>37% of internet users contributed to news </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>20% contributed to health content </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>19% contributed to civic and political activities </li></ul></ul>
    12. 12. New community-building activities that online content creation enable <ul><li>Produce content that helps them expand their social network and increase their social standing </li></ul><ul><li>Produce content to create social posses to solve problems </li></ul><ul><li>Produce content to construct “just-in-time-just-like-me” support groups </li></ul><ul><li>Produce content unlike traditional news organizations </li></ul>
    13. 13. New community-building activities that online content creation enables <ul><li>Produce content that helps them expand their social network and increase their social standing </li></ul><ul><li>Produce content to create social posses to solve problems </li></ul><ul><li>Produce content to construct “just-in-time-just-like-me” support groups </li></ul><ul><li>Produce content unlike traditional news organizations </li></ul>
    14. 14. <ul><li>Beyond Reality - Janet and Maddie </li></ul>
    15. 17. Advantages to creators – conclusions of MacArthur Foundation team <ul><li>Negotiating friendship, status, identity </li></ul><ul><li>Building spaces for building social networks among friends AND those who share interests </li></ul><ul><li>Creating learning opportunities </li></ul><ul><li>Gaining reputational capital </li></ul>
    16. 18. New community-building activities that online content creation enables <ul><li>Produce content that helps them expand their social network and increase their social standing </li></ul><ul><li>Produce content to create social posses to solve problems </li></ul><ul><li>Produce content to construct “just-in-time-just-like-me” support groups </li></ul><ul><li>Produce content unlike traditional news organizations </li></ul>
    17. 19. Acura TSX - Car thief posse
    18. 21. <ul><li>After the internet forensics were complete, and group members were convinced they had their man, the first thing that emerged were image mashups of the alleged thief, mostly making fun of him. Soon thereafter, users combed over Google Maps using the pictures of his car in front of his house and information that it was in Richmond Hill neighborhood and eventually they were able to identify his address by recognizing it in the satellite view, Hirsh wrote. And then more information was unearthed: “They were able to identify his mom and where she lives, his grandmother and where she lives, his sister, her employment, and some of his past crimes, including the fact that he is currently driving even though his license is suspended.” </li></ul>
    19. 22. Advantages to creators in posse situations <ul><li>Fact checking and transparency </li></ul><ul><li>Crowdsourcing wisdom, especially among “strangers” who share a common purpose </li></ul><ul><li>Production and accumulation of evidence that is easily search-able </li></ul>
    20. 23. New community-building activities that online content creation enables <ul><li>Produce content that helps them expand their social network and increase their social standing </li></ul><ul><li>Produce content to create social posses to solve problems </li></ul><ul><li>Produce content to construct “just-in-time-just-like-me” support groups </li></ul><ul><li>Produce content unlike traditional news organizations </li></ul>
    21. 24. Karen Parles material
    22. 26. <ul><li>From Esther Schreurs: “I never met Karen personally, but found her when I really needed to find a survivor of this terrible disease. When I found her site, it really was the only one dedicated to survivorship in 2001. I was desperate for information and I found more than that on her site, I found HOPE. I can't overestimate the enormous impact and inspiration she had on me in those early years after my diagnosis.” </li></ul>
    23. 27. Just-in-time-just-like-me communities <ul><li>Communities of just-in-time information and support – ad hoc and “on the fly” </li></ul><ul><li>Communities of “rare species” </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Homophily (“birds of a feather”) par excellence </li></ul></ul><ul><li>Communities of practice – that are “space-less” </li></ul>
    24. 28. New community-building activities that online content creation enables <ul><li>Produce content that helps them expand their social network and increase their social standing </li></ul><ul><li>Produce content to create social posses to solve problems </li></ul><ul><li>Produce content to construct “just-in-time-just-like-me” support groups </li></ul><ul><li>Produce content unlike traditional news organizations </li></ul>
    25. 29. Social media-sphere is the “5th estate” Week of March 30-April 5, 2009
    26. 30. 5 th estate publishing tastes <ul><li>Technology developments, especially activities in the social media environment </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Bloggers as “rocket boosters” </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Links as social currency </li></ul></ul><ul><li>Off-beat stories, especially those with quirky humor </li></ul><ul><li>American exceptionalism stories </li></ul><ul><li>Cultural cleavages and social issues more than economic issues </li></ul>
    27. 31. Implications for libraries – 1 <ul><li>You can be a node in people’s social networks as they seek information to help them solve problems and meet their needs </li></ul>
    28. 32. Implications for libraries – 2 <ul><li>You can teach new literacies </li></ul><ul><li>- graphics </li></ul><ul><li>- navigation </li></ul><ul><li>- connections and context </li></ul><ul><li>- skepticism </li></ul><ul><li>- value of contemplative time </li></ul><ul><li>- how to create content </li></ul><ul><li>- ethical behavior in new world </li></ul>
    29. 33. Implications for libraries – 3 <ul><li>Need to re-vision your role in a world where much has changed </li></ul><ul><li>- Access to information </li></ul><ul><li>Value of information </li></ul><ul><li>Curating collections </li></ul><ul><li>Creating media – networked creators should be your allies </li></ul>
    30. 34. Thank you! <ul><li>Lee Rainie </li></ul><ul><li>Director </li></ul><ul><li>Pew Internet & American Life Project </li></ul><ul><li>1615 L Street NW </li></ul><ul><li>Suite 700 </li></ul><ul><li>Washington, DC 20036 </li></ul><ul><li>Email: [email_address] </li></ul><ul><li>Twitter: http://twitter.com/lrainie </li></ul><ul><li>202-419-4500 </li></ul>
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