The Magic of Social Networks

5,087 views

Published on

How libraries can be a node that helps people solve problems - By Lee Rainie

Published in: Technology, Business
0 Comments
7 Likes
Statistics
Notes
  • Be the first to comment

No Downloads
Views
Total views
5,087
On SlideShare
0
From Embeds
0
Number of Embeds
1,374
Actions
Shares
0
Downloads
116
Comments
0
Likes
7
Embeds 0
No embeds

No notes for slide

The Magic of Social Networks

  1. 1. THE MAGIC OF SOCIAL NETWORKS How libraries can be a node that helps people solve problems Lee Rainie Director – Pew Internet Project Wisconsin Library Association Appleton, WI 10.21.09
  2. 2. "If you plopped a library down. . .30 years from now. . .there would be cobwebs growing everywhere because people would look at it and wouldn't think of it as a legitimate institution because it would be so far behind. . ." -- Experienced library user . 1996 Benton Foundation report: “ Buildings, books, and bytes”
  3. 3. “ Many Americans would just as soon turn their local libraries into museums and recruit retirees to staff them.” 1996 Benton Foundation report: “ Buildings, books, and bytes”
  4. 4. New information ecosystem: Then and Now Industrial Age Info was: Scarce Expensive Institutionally oriented Designed for consumption Information Age Info is: Abundant Cheap Personally oriented Designed for participation
  5. 5. 2000 46% of adults use internet 5% with broadband at home 50% own a cell phone 0% connect to internet wirelessly <10% use “cloud” = slow, stationary connections built around my computer The internet is the asteroid: Then and now 2009 77-79% of adults use internet 63% with broadband at home 85% own a cell phone 54-56% connect to internet wirelessly >two-thirds use “cloud” = fast, mobile connections built around outside servers and storage
  6. 6. Media ecology – then (industrial age) <ul><li>Product Route to home Display Local storage </li></ul><ul><li>TV stations phone TV Cassette/ 8-track </li></ul><ul><li> broadcast TV radio </li></ul><ul><li> broadcast radio stereo Vinyl album </li></ul><ul><li>News mail </li></ul><ul><li>Advertising newspaper delivery phone </li></ul><ul><li> paper </li></ul><ul><li>Radio Stations non-electronic </li></ul>Tom Wolzien, Sanford C. Bernstein & Co
  7. 7. Media ecology – now (information age) <ul><li>Product Route to home Display Local storage </li></ul><ul><li> cable TiVo (PVR) VCR </li></ul><ul><li>TV stations DSL TV Satellite radio player </li></ul><ul><li>Info wireless/phone radio DVD </li></ul><ul><li>“ Daily me” broadcast TV PC Web-based storage </li></ul><ul><li>content books iPod /MP3 server/ TiVo (PVR) </li></ul><ul><li>Cable Nets broadcast radio stereo PC </li></ul><ul><li>Web sites satellite monitor web storage/servers </li></ul><ul><li>Local news mail headphones CD/CD-ROM </li></ul><ul><li>Content from express delivery pager satellite player cell phone memory </li></ul><ul><li>individuals iPod / storage portable gamer MP3 player / iPod </li></ul><ul><li>Peer-to-peer subcarriers / WIFI cell phone pagers - PDAs </li></ul><ul><li>Advertising newspaper delivery non-electronic cable box </li></ul><ul><li>Radio stations camcorder/camera PDA/Palm game console </li></ul><ul><li>game console paper </li></ul><ul><li>Satellite radio e-reader / Kindle storage sticks/disks e-reader/Kindle </li></ul>Adapted from Tom Wolzien, Sanford C. Bernstein & Co 47% of adults own laptops – up from 30% in 2006 37% of adults own DVRs – up from 3% in 2002 18% of adults own personal gaming devices 37% of adults own game consoles 45% of adults own MP3 players – up from 11% in 2005
  8. 8. Media ecology – now (information age) <ul><li>Product Route to home Display Local storage </li></ul><ul><li> cable TiVo (PVR) VCR </li></ul><ul><li>TV stations DSL TV Satellite radio player </li></ul><ul><li>Info wireless/phone radio DVD </li></ul><ul><li>“ Daily me” broadcast TV PC Web-based storage </li></ul><ul><li>content books iPod /MP3 server/ TiVo (PVR) </li></ul><ul><li>Cable Nets broadcast radio stereo PC </li></ul><ul><li>Web sites satellite monitor web storage/servers </li></ul><ul><li>Local news mail headphones CD/CD-ROM </li></ul><ul><li>Content from express delivery pager satellite player cell phone memory </li></ul><ul><li>individuals iPod / storage portable gamer MP3 player / iPod </li></ul><ul><li>Peer-to-peer subcarriers / WIFI cell phone pagers - PDAs </li></ul><ul><li>Advertising newspaper delivery non-electronic cable box </li></ul><ul><li>Radio stations camcorder/camera PDA/Palm game console </li></ul><ul><li>game console paper </li></ul><ul><li>Satellite radio e-reader / Kindle storage sticks/disks e-reader/Kindle </li></ul>Adapted from Tom Wolzien, Sanford C. Bernstein & Co Ubiquitous computing age Cloud computing “Internet of things”
  9. 9. Media ecology – now (information age) <ul><li>Product Route to home Display Local storage </li></ul><ul><li> cable TiVo (PVR) VCR </li></ul><ul><li>TV stations DSL TV Satellite radio player </li></ul><ul><li>Info wireless/phone radio DVD </li></ul><ul><li>“ Daily me” broadcast TV PC Web-based storage </li></ul><ul><li>content books iPod /MP3 server/ TiVo (PVR) </li></ul><ul><li>Cable Nets broadcast radio stereo PC </li></ul><ul><li>Web sites satellite monitor web storage/servers </li></ul><ul><li>Local news mail headphones CD/CD-ROM </li></ul><ul><li>Content from express delivery pager satellite player cell phone memory </li></ul><ul><li>individuals iPod / storage portable gamer MP3 player / iPod </li></ul><ul><li>Peer-to-peer subcarriers / WIFI cell phone pagers - PDAs </li></ul><ul><li>Advertising newspaper delivery non-electronic cable box </li></ul><ul><li>Radio stations camcorder/camera PDA/Palm game console </li></ul><ul><li>game console paper </li></ul><ul><li>Satellite radio e-reader / Kindle storage sticks/disks e-reader/Kindle </li></ul>Adapted from Tom Wolzien, Sanford C. Bernstein & Co … and this all affects social networks 1) their composition 2) the way people use them 3) their importance 4) the way librarians can play a part in them
  10. 10. Behold the idea of networked individualism Barry Wellman – University of Toronto <ul><li>The turn from groups to social networks = a new social operating system </li></ul>
  11. 11. Big societal forces pushing us toward networked individualism <ul><li>Affluence and affordable technology </li></ul><ul><li>Expanding consumer options </li></ul><ul><li>Income and wealth volatility </li></ul><ul><li>Job security and longevity </li></ul><ul><li>Rise of free agency and freelancing </li></ul><ul><li>Changes in family composition, roles, responsibilities </li></ul><ul><li>Trends towards management of retirement and health care </li></ul><ul><li>Rise of DIY politics and religion </li></ul>
  12. 12. Why good social networks (and social networking) matter <ul><li>Healthier </li></ul><ul><li>Wealthier </li></ul><ul><li>Happier </li></ul><ul><li>More civically engaged = better communities </li></ul><ul><li>----------------------------- </li></ul><ul><li>Diversity makes a difference </li></ul><ul><li>Size of network makes a difference </li></ul>
  13. 13. 10 ways digital technology has changed things for your patrons and their networking behavior
  14. 14. Network ecosystem change – 1 <ul><li>Volume of information grows </li></ul><ul><li>-- Chris Anderson </li></ul><ul><li>Hal Varian </li></ul>
  15. 15. Network ecosystem change – 2 <ul><li>Variety of information and sources of information grow </li></ul>
  16. 16. … and people have more options for their passions -- Markus Prior and Cass Sunstein
  17. 17. People-Press news consumer typology
  18. 18. The internet rises in a fragmented media environment (% of all Americans who “regularly” go to news source: PRC People/Press) +1,850% -25% -52% +18% -41% -27%
  19. 19. Network ecosystem change – 3 <ul><li>Velocity of information increases and smart mobs emerge </li></ul><ul><li>-- Howard Rheingold Clay Shirky </li></ul>
  20. 20. Network ecosystem change – 4 <ul><li>Venues of intersecting with information and people multiply and the availability of information expands to all hours of the day and all places we are </li></ul><ul><li>-- Nielsen Company </li></ul>
  21. 21. Network ecosystem change – 5 <ul><li>People’s vigilance for information changes in two directions: </li></ul><ul><li>1) attention is truncated (Linda Stone) </li></ul><ul><li>2) attention is elongated (Andrew Keen; Terry Fisher) </li></ul>
  22. 22. Kaiser Family Foundation, Media Multitasking Among American Youth, December 2006
  23. 23. Kaiser Family Foundation, Media Multitasking Among American Youth, December 2006
  24. 24. Network ecosystem change – 6 <ul><li>The vibrance and immersive qualities of media environments makes them more compelling places to hang out and interact </li></ul><ul><li>-- Metaverse Roadmap Project </li></ul>1) Virtual Worlds
  25. 25. Network ecosystem change – 6 <ul><li>The vibrance and immersive qualities of media environments makes them more compelling places to hang out and interact </li></ul><ul><li>-- Metaverse Roadmap Project </li></ul>2) Mirror Worlds
  26. 26. Network ecosystem change – 6 <ul><li>The vibrance and immersive qualities of media environments makes them more compelling places to hang out and interact </li></ul><ul><li>-- Metaverse Roadmap Project </li></ul>3) Augmented Reality
  27. 27. Network ecosystem change – 6 <ul><li>The vibrance and immersive qualities of media environments makes them more compelling places to hang out and interact </li></ul><ul><li>-- Metaverse Roadmap Project </li></ul>4) Life-logging -- Gordon Bell
  28. 28. Network ecosystem change – 7 <ul><li>Valence (relevance) of information improves – search and customization get better as we create the “Daily Me” and “Daily Us” </li></ul><ul><li>– Nicholas Negroponte </li></ul>
  29. 29. Network ecosystem change – 8 <ul><li>The voice of information democratizes and the visibility of new creators is enhanced. Identity and privacy change. </li></ul><ul><li>-- William Dutton </li></ul>
  30. 30. Network ecosystem change – 9 <ul><li>Voting on and ventilating about information proliferates as tagging, rating, and commenting occurs and collective intelligence asserts itself </li></ul><ul><li>-- Henry Jenkins </li></ul><ul><li>David Weinberger </li></ul>
  31. 31. <ul><li>31% of adult internet users have rated a person, product, or service online </li></ul>Information sharing and evaluation
  32. 32. Network ecosystem change – 10 <ul><li>Social networks become more vivid and meaningful. Media-making is part of social networking. “Networked individualism” takes hold. </li></ul><ul><li>-- Barry Wellman </li></ul>
  33. 33. <ul><li>>68% of online teens have created their own profile on a social network site </li></ul><ul><li>---- </li></ul><ul><li>47% of online adults have such profiles </li></ul>Content creation
  34. 34. <ul><li>33% of college students keep blogs and regularly post </li></ul><ul><li>54% read blogs </li></ul><ul><li>---- </li></ul><ul><li>11% of online adults have a blog </li></ul><ul><li>36% read them </li></ul>Content creation
  35. 35. Content creation 15% of online adults say they remix content they find online into their own artistic creations
  36. 36. Networked Individuals … have a different … <ul><li>Sense of information availability – it’s ambient </li></ul><ul><li>Sense of time – it’s oriented around “continuous partial attention” </li></ul><ul><li>Sense of community and connection – it’s about “absent presence” </li></ul><ul><li>Sense of the rewards and challenges of networking for social, economic, political, and cultural purposes – new layers and new audiences </li></ul>
  37. 37. Technology has helped people change their networks <ul><li>Bigger </li></ul><ul><li>Looser </li></ul><ul><li>More segmented </li></ul><ul><li>More layered </li></ul><ul><li>= </li></ul><ul><li>More liberated </li></ul><ul><li>More work </li></ul><ul><li>More important as sources of support and information, filters, curators, audience </li></ul>
  38. 38. A new pattern of communication and influence built around social networks and participatory media <ul><li>The four-step flow of information </li></ul><ul><li>attention </li></ul><ul><li>acquisition </li></ul><ul><li>assessment </li></ul><ul><li>action </li></ul>
  39. 39. How do you…. <ul><li>get his/her attention? </li></ul><ul><ul><li>leverage your traditional services </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>offer alerts, updates, feeds </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>be available in relevant places </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>find pathways through his/her social network </li></ul></ul>
  40. 40. How do you…. <ul><li>help him/her acquire information? </li></ul><ul><ul><li>be findable in a “long tail” world </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>pursue new distribution methods </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>offer “link love” for selfish reasons </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>participate in the conversation about your work </li></ul></ul>
  41. 41. How do you…. <ul><li>help him/her assess information? </li></ul><ul><ul><li>be transparent, link-friendly, and archive everything </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>aggregate the best related work </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>when you make mistakes, seek forgiveness </li></ul></ul>
  42. 42. How do you…. <ul><li>assist him/her act on information? </li></ul><ul><ul><li>offer opportunities for feedback </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>offer opportunities for remixing </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>offer opportunities for community building </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>be open to the wisdom of crowds </li></ul></ul>
  43. 43. 8 tips on how to be a node in a social network <ul><li>Think like a friend </li></ul><ul><li>Remember your strengths and play to them by being an expert, a filter, and a recommender (linker) </li></ul><ul><li>Be aware that your audience is bigger than the available evidence provides – lurkers and future arrivals are part of the mix </li></ul><ul><li>Look for opportunities to provide support to users and chances to build communities with your material </li></ul>
  44. 44. 8 tips on how to be a node in a social network <ul><li>Help people cope with technology </li></ul><ul><li>Participate in the Web 2.0 world </li></ul><ul><li>Embrace the move towards mobility, constant connectivity, perpetual contact </li></ul><ul><ul><li>This changes the realities of time and space and presence </li></ul></ul><ul><li>Ask for help/feedback </li></ul>
  45. 45. Thank you! <ul><li>Lee Rainie </li></ul><ul><li>Director </li></ul><ul><li>Pew Internet & American Life Project </li></ul><ul><li>1615 L Street NW </li></ul><ul><li>Suite 700 </li></ul><ul><li>Washington, DC 20036 </li></ul><ul><li>Email: [email_address] </li></ul><ul><li>Twitter: http://twitter.com/lrainie </li></ul><ul><li>202-419-4500 </li></ul>

×