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Mobile Philanthropy
 
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    Mobile Philanthropy Mobile Philanthropy Presentation Transcript

    • Mobile Philanthropy How mobile/social tools arechanging the way Americans giveto and interact with organizations Aaron Smith Senior Research Specialist Pew Internet Project Thrive Arts Conference June 13, 2012
    • • Part of the Pew Research Center, a nonpartisan “fact tank” based in Washington, DC• PRC’s mission is to provide high quality, objective data to thought leaders and policymakers• Data for this talk is from nationally representative telephone surveys of U.S. adults (on landlines and cell phones)• Presentation slides and all data are available at pewinternet.org
    • The Internet:Then and Now
    • Internet Use in the U.S. in 2000 Slow, stationary connections 46% of US adults used the internet built around a desktop computer 5% had home broadband connections 53% owned a cell phone 0% connected to internet wirelessly 0% used social network sites _________________________Information flowed mainly one way Information consumption was a stationary activity
    • The Internet in 2012 Mobile devices have82% of US adults use the internet fundamentally changed the relationship between 2/3 have broadband at home information, time and space88% have a cell phone; 46% are Information is now smartphone users portable, participatory, and personal 19% have a tablet computer 19% have an e-reader 2/3 are wireless internet users 65% of online adults use SNS
    • The Very Nature of Information Has Changed Information Information was… is… Scarce All around us Expensive Cheap or free Shaped and controlled Shaped and controlled by by elites consumers and networks Designed for one-way, Designed for sharing, mass consumption participation and feedback Slow moving Immediate External to our worlds Embedded in our worlds
    • Information is Woven Into Our LivesMobile is the needle, Social Networks are the thread Mobile… Social Networks… Moves information Surround us with with us information through our many connections Makes informationaccessible ANYTIME Bring us information and ANYWHERE from multiple, varied sources Puts information at our fingertips Provide instant feedback, meaning and contextMagnifies the demandfor timely information Allow us to shape and create information Makes information ourselves and amplify location-sensitive others’ messages
    • GADGETS
    • Adult gadget ownership over time (2006-2012) % of American adults age 18+ who own each device Source: Pew Internet surveys, 2006-2012
    • Gadget ownership snapshot for adults age 18+ % of American adults age 18+ who own each device Subset of cell phones Source: The Pew Research Center’s Internet & American Life Project surveys.
    • Mobile is the Needle: 88% of US Adults Have a Cell Phone % in each age group who have a cell phone 46% of US adults now own SMARTPHONES, up from 35% in Spring 2011 Highest rates among: 18-24 year-olds (67%) 25-34 year-olds (71%) Half of cell owners use their phone to go online, and nearly one in three use the internet mostly on their cell phone instead of a laptop or Teen data July 2011 Adult data Feb 2012 desktop computer
    • Smartphone ownership by age & income/education% of adults within each group who own a smartphone (for example, 58% of 18-29 year olds with a household income of lessthan $30,000 per year are smartphone owners) 18-29 30-49 50-64 65+ (n=336) (n=601) (n=639) (n=626)All adults 66% 59% 34% 13%Annual Household IncomeLess than $30,000 58 42 16 5$30,000 or more 72 69 44 27Educational AttainmentHigh school grad or less 63 43 22 8Some college or college graduate 70 71 44 20Source: Pew Research Center’s Internet & American Life Project January 20-February 19, 2012 tracking survey. N=2,253 adults age 18 and older,including 901 interviews conducted on respondent’s cell phone. Interviews conducted in both English and Spanish.
    • Overall, if you had to use one single word to describe how you feel about your cell phone, what would that one word be?
    • Mobile is the Needle That Weaves Information Throughout Our World% of US adult cell owners who use their phones to…
    • Cell Phone Activities by Race/Ethnicity% of adult cell phone owners age 18+ within each group who do the following activities with their cell phone White, non- Black, non- Hispanic Hispanic Hispanic (n=1343) (n=232) (n=196)Send or receive text messages 70 76 83*Take a picture 71 70 79*Access the internet 39 56* 51*Send a photo or video to someone 52 58 61*Send or receive email 34 46* 43*Download an app 28 36* 36*Play a game 31 43* 40*Play music 27 45* 47*Record a video 30 41* 42*Access a social networking site 25 39* 35*Watch a video 21 33* 39*Post a photo or video online 18 30* 28*Check bank balance or do online banking 15 27* 25**indicates statistically significant differences compared with whites.Source: The Pew Research Centers Internet & American Life Project, April 26 – May 22, 2011 Spring Tracking Survey. n=2,277 adults ages 18and older, including 755 cell phone interviews. Interviews were conducted in English and Spanish.
    • How Phones Function In Our Lives% of US adult cell owners who had done each of the following in the 30 days prior to the survey…
    • Using Phones for Real-Time Information % of cell owners in each age group who have performed these real-time activities in the previous 30 days 60% 45 Coordinate a gathering 27 23 49% 39 Solve an unexpected problem 26 15 Decide whether or not to visit a 43% 37 business, such as restaurant 18 12 18-29 Look up something to settle an 45% 31 15 argument 4 30-49 33% 29 Look up sports score 14 50-64 5 31%Get up-to-the minute traffic or public 23 65+ transit info 11 4 21% 21 Get help in an emergency situation 18 16 0% 20% 40% 60% 80% 100% Source: Pew Research Center’s Internet & American Life Mobile Survey, March 15-April 3, 2012.
    • Apps: From Superhighway to BypassOne in three US adults download apps to a cell phone or tablet computer Apps provide direct connections to information % of app downloaders who have downloaded each type of app… App downloading is highest among young adults age 18-29 Based on August 2011 Pew Internet Tracking Survey
    • Apps, Geolocation and Augmented Reality
    • Tablet and E-reader Use is on the Rise • 29% of adults own a specialized device for e-reading (either a tablet or an e-reader) – 19% of adults own an e-book reader – 19% of adults own a tablet computer • E-book reader and tablet ownership are strongly correlated with income and education, and these devices are most popular with adults under age 50 • Women are more likely than men to own e- readers, and parents are more likely than non-parents to own tablets
    • SOCIAL NETWORKS =NETWORKED INDIVIDUALS, NETWORKED INFORMATION
    • Social Networks are the Threads That Connect Us 65% of online adults use social networking sites Consistent rates across gender,race/ethnicity, and income groups
    • Why Adults 18+ Use Social Networks
    • Social Networks and Social Cohesion For networked individuals, information is embeddedA Pew study finds that contrary to fears the and ambient internet isolates people...• Facebook usersare more trustingthan other adults• Facebook users have more close relationships• Facebook users get more social support than other adults
    • Special Focus - TwitterTwitter use is especially prominent among… • African- Americans • 18-24 year olds • Mobile users
    • Case Studies The “Text to Haiti” Campaign and PewArts Survey
    • “Mobile Donor” study • 20% of American adults have made a charitable donation online, and 9% have done so via text message • Partnered with mGive Foundation, Knight Foundation and Berkman Center to get deeper insights into this group and their experiences with mobile donations • Telephone survey of 1,003 text donors to Haiti relief – Many people screened out due to age (under 18) or because their number was reassigned
    • Generally speaking, the mobile donors we surveyed are just “regular folks” Their tech use is > than the national avg They are young and racially diverse compared with other types of charitable donors They aren’t especially engaged with social/political issues, and don’t follow national or int’l news especially closely They participate in social/civic groups at the same rate as other Americans
    • Mobile phones facilitate “impulse giving”—most textdonors gave within one day of hearing about campaign… How long Haiti donors waited between hearing about campaign and making their text donation Source: Pew Research Center’s Internet & American Life Project, Berkman Center for Internet & Society and mGive Foundation September 9, 2011 – October 13, 2011 survey of 863 cell phone owners who texted a donation to Haiti earthquake relief. Margin of error is +/-3 percentage points based on Haiti text donors who consented to further contacts on their mobile phone.
    • % of adult book readers (age 18+) using this format on an average …and generally viewDecember 2011 day, as of June 2010 and text donations as a spur-of-the- moment decision When you make an online/text donation, is it…Source: Pew Research Center’s Internet & American Life Project, Berkman Center for Internet & Society and mGive FoundationSeptember 9, 2011 – October 13, 2011 survey of 863 cell phone owners who texted a donation to Haiti earthquake relief. Margin oferror is +/-3 percentage points based on Haiti text donors who consented to further contacts on their mobile phone.
    • % of adult book readers (age 18+) using this format on an average The Haiti donors we December 2011 day, as of June 2010 and surveyed have not followed the ongoing reconstruction efforts very closely… How closely have you been following events in Haiti following the earthquake?Source: Pew Research Center’s Internet & American Life Project, Berkman Center for Internet & Society and mGive FoundationSeptember 9, 2011 – October 13, 2011 survey of 863 cell phone owners who texted a donation to Haiti earthquake relief. Margin oferror is +/-3 percentage points based on Haiti text donors who consented to further contacts on their mobile phone.
    • % of adult book readers (age 18+) using this format on an average…but theyas of June 2010 and December 2011 day, encouraged others to donate through their (face- to-face) friend networks % within each group who encouraged others to make a text donation to Haiti relief by… Source: Pew Research Center’s Internet & American Life Project, Berkman Center for Internet & Society and mGive Foundation September 9, 2011 – October 13, 2011 survey of 863 cell phone owners who texted a donation to Haiti earthquake relief. Margin of error is +/-3 percentage points based on Haiti text donors who consented to further contacts on their mobile phone.
    • % of adult book readers (age 18+) using this format on an average…and many of June 2010 and Decemberdonate to other more day, as have continued to 2011 recent disaster response efforts % within each group who texted a donation to… Source: Pew Research Center’s Internet & American Life Project, Berkman Center for Internet & Society and mGive Foundation September 9, 2011 – October 13, 2011 survey of 863 cell phone owners who texted a donation to Haiti earthquake relief. Margin of error is +/-3 percentage points based on Haiti text donors who consented to further contacts on their mobile phone.
    • “Internet and Arts Organizations” study • National survey of all arts organizations that received an NEA grant between 2006-2011 – NEA funding just a mechanism to build respondent pool; NEA did not sponsor, no questions about NEA’s role – Goal is to evaluate how arts orgs are using internet, social media and other digital technologies in outreach, communications, development, etc. • 3k orgs contacted, currently ~600 completed surveys • Survey ongoing through July, report in Fall
    • All data available at: pewinternet.org Aaron Smith Senior Research SpecialistPew Research Center’s Internet & American Life Project asmith@pewinternet.org Twitter: @pewinternet @aaron_w_smith