IPM Insect Monitoring Project (SRASHS Conference)
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IPM Insect Monitoring Project (SRASHS Conference)

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Describes results of the 2009 insect monitoring project from Alabama.

Describes results of the 2009 insect monitoring project from Alabama.

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  • There were at least two generations detected one month apart of BAW in north central AL. Three peaks could be detected one month apart in south AL along the Gulf Coast. Trends were unclear in northern AL.
  • Trends in FAW population were stronger than BAW seen before. FAW pressures were high in all parts of AL. There were at least two generations detected one month apart of FAW in north central AL. Three peaks could be detected one month apart in south AL along the Gulf Coast. Impact of weather parameters was also stronger on FAW populations than BAW.

IPM Insect Monitoring Project (SRASHS Conference) IPM Insect Monitoring Project (SRASHS Conference) Presentation Transcript

  • Preliminary Findings from the Alabama Insect Pest Survey using Pheromone Traps Dr. Ayanava Majumdar Ext. Entomologist, AL SARE Coordinator Henry Fadamiro Assoc. Prof., AL IPM Coordinator Robert Boozer Research Extension Horticulturist
  • Program objectives
    • Research components:
    • Efficacy of pheromone traps as a early detection tool (short-term)
    • Understand activity periods for key insect pests (medium-term)
    • Develop site-specific forecasting system (long-term)
    • Educational components (based on needs assessment):
    • Early warning system for growers/consultants/Agents (short-term)
    • Increase adoption of pheromone traps (medium-term)
    • Thrust to vegetable/peanut IPM via IPM-CORE (long-term)
    Funding (2009): Extension IPM Initiative, National Peanut Board IPM-CORE = IPM Communication Resources…new outreach project
  • Background information
    • Pheromone trap catches indicate pest density, activity…
    • Major reviews: Taylor (1963), Roelofs & Carde (1977), Meagher (2001), Cullen & Zalom (2005)
    • Advantages to growers: specificity, sensitivity, simplicity, safety (4-S’s)
    • Active insect monitoring programs in FIELD CROPS:
      • ND: sunflower, wheat, sugarbeet
      • KY, TN: 6 insect species, 2 locations
      • MS: bollworms, southwestern corn borer
      • IA, IL: rootworms
      • AL: comprehensive survey of 16 insect sp.
    • Trap network (operated by REAs):
      • N-S along I-65: vegetable fields
      • E-W along I-10: peanut fields
    • Commercial traps/lures
    • Trapping period: June-October (delayed start)
    • Trapping interval (2009): 14 days
    • Weather data for 5 sites (AWIS)
    • Data analysis:
      • Descriptive statistics
      • Pearsonian correlation (P = 0.10) after square root transformation
    • Insect species monitored:
      • Beet armyworm, Spodoptera exigua (Hub.)
      • Fall armyworm, S. frugiperda (J.E. Smith)
      • Southern armyworm, S. eridania (Stoll)
      • Corn earworm, Helicoverpa zea (Hub.)
      • Tobacco budworm, H. virescens (Fabr.)
      • Lesser corn stalk borer, Elasmopalpus lignosellus (Zeller)
      • Cabbage looper, Trichoplusia ni (Hub.)
      • Soybean looper, P. includens (Walker)
      • Black cutworm, Agrotis ipsilon (Hufnagel)
      • Corn rootworm (northern, southern, western)
      • Stink bugs, Euschistus conspersus (Nezara viridula?)
      • European corn borer, Ostrinia nubilalis (Hub.)
      • Tomato pinworm, Keiferia lycopersicella (Walshingham)
      • Diamondback moth, Plutella xylostella (L.)
  • Preliminary results 2009
      • Insect catches (June-Oct.):
      • Lesser cornstalk borer (LCB) = 3,586
      • Fall armyworm (FAW) = 1,386
      • Beet armyworm (BAW) = 1,377
      • Corn earworm (CEW) = 589
      • Southern armyworm (SAW) = 393
      • Tobacco budworm (TBW) = 342
      • Soybean looper (SL) = 230
      • Cabbage looper (CL) = 223
      • Corn rootworm (CRW): Southern = 253; Western = 13
      • Black cutworm (BCW) = 125
      • Diamondback moth (DBM) = 65**
      • Tomato pinworm (TPW) = 4**
      • European corn borer (ECB) = 0**
      • Stink bugs (SB, Euschistus) = 0*
    * Trap damaged at many locations ** Late collection (July-Oct.) Total = 8,586 High Low
  • 4 10 21 33 49 25 8 19 36 27 25 Insect density (overall) per site Year 2009 Monthly average activity (statewide)
  • 20 19 15 32 48 27 36 29 17 12 Insect density (overall) per site Year 2009 16 13 Monthly average activity (statewide)
  • 6 10 25 12 16 5 3 11 8 3 8 17 Insect density (overall) per site Year 2009 7 Monthly average activity (statewide)
  • 3 2 7 20 15 3 6 6 3 1 3 Insect density (overall) per site Year 2009 Monthly average activity (statewide)
  • 119 116 76 46 142 143 77 Insect density (overall) per site Year 2009 Monthly average activity (statewide)
  • 4 28 3 WCRW 12 7 1 1 4 2 June, July June June 8 1 WCRW June WCRW SCRW Year 2009 Source: K. Flanders (2010)
  • Impact of Weather on Trap Catches Sign. Correlation of TEMPERATURE : Numbers indicate significant correlations at P = 0.10. +/- indicates direction of relationship (preliminary findings). Rain days indicate number of days rainfall exceeded 0.1 inch. Sign. Correlation of RAIN DAYS : Year 2009 RAINFALL County BAW FAW CEW TBW LCB CRW Cullman NS NS NS 0.9655 (-) NA NS Chilton 0.9989 (-) 0.9028 (-) 0.6599 (-) 0.9913 (-) NA NS Baldwin NS NS 0.5863 (-) NS NS NS Escambia NS 0.8603 (-) NS 0.6295 (+) NS NS Henry NS NS NS NS NS County BAW FAW CEW TBW LCB CRW Cullman NS 0.9905 (+) NS NS NA 0.5988 (+) Chilton NS NS NS NS NA NS Baldwin 0.9154 (+) 0.9838 (+) NS NS 0.8347 (+) 0.5882 (-) Escambia 0.6661 (+) NS 0.7080 (+) NS NS NS Henry NS 0.9851 (+) NS NS 0.7368 (+) 0.8819 (-)
  • Discussion
    • Counties along the Gulf Coast had highest insect numbers
    • Unusually high trap catches: FAW, BAW, LCB
    • Outbreak reports (2009): FAW, BAW, LCB, CRW
    • Outbreaks consistent with high trap catches
    • Variability due to weather: insects trapped near the upper activity threshold due to excessive heat (Taylor 1963)
    • Appropriate weather could trigger outbreaks>>>
    • Project archive: www.aces.edu/go/85
    • Web outreach: Blogs, YouTube
    • AU Pest Alert (direct email): July-October
    • “ Timely Information” on AlabamaCrops.com, AGFAX.COM
    • IPM Hotline (messages): 1-800-446-0375
    • Mobile exhibit at grower meetings, tradeshows
    • Timely revisions to
      • Peanut IPM Guide
      • Ext. bulletins (peanuts, vegetables)
    Concept: Synchronized rapid IPM information delivery to growers
  • IPM-CORE New Integrated Vegetable Entomology Website: SUBSCRIBE TO BLOGS FOR AUTOMATIC EMAIL UPDATES
  • Future research on pheromones
    • Add more trap sites, collaborate with other surveyors in AL
    • Weekly trap counts with a dedicated team
    • Weather record (data loggers) for each trap site
    • Improve/test new trap design – stink bug
    • Test new pheromone lures – yellow margined leaf beetle
    • Strengthen IPM-CORE for grower benefit:
      • Keep providing Pest Alerts farmers
      • Incorporate diverse channels
  • Acknowledgements
    • IPM Coordinators:
      • A. Majumdar
      • H. Fadamiro
      • K. Flanders
    • IPM Team Members:
      • Lloyd Chapman
      • Neil Kelly
      • Michael Reeves
      • Gary Gray
      • James Miles
      • William East, Jr.
      • Brandon Dillard
      • Leonard Kuykendall
      • Chris Becker
      • Timothy Reed
    Thank you very much.