SERVICE MARKETING MIX
IN INDIAN SCENARIO
TEAM 8:
1.PRAMITHA
2.AKHILESH

3.MOUMITHA GHOSH
4.LIVIN
5.DILEEP M M
6.ARJUN GOWD...
7 P’s
7 P’s in TOURISM (in India)
TRAVEL & TOURISM
EVOLUTION


2000 years Before Christ, in India and Mesopotamia



Travel for trade was an important fea...


Role of the industrial revolution in promoting travel in the west



The rapid urbanization due to industrialization l...


Highlights of travel in the nineteenth century



Advent of railway initially catalyzed business travel and later leis...
PRODUCT


Travel and Tourism one of the world's largest foreign exchange earner among
industries, provides employment dir...
TYPES OF TOURISM


Leisure travel



Winter tourism



Mass tourism



Ecotourism



Recession tourism



Medical to...
PLACE


Not only the location of the tourist attraction or facility but the location of
points of sale that provides cust...
PRICE


Price is what the business charges for its’ tourism product as defined by the
interacting forces of supply and de...
PEOPLE


Traveller



Tourist

Meet their expectations


Employees – Physical appearance, Knowledge, Grooming, Trained
...
PROCESS



There are different types of processes involved in running a tourism business
administration,



training,

...
PROMOTION


A range of activities can be used to convince customers to buy the product,
including information kits, web s...
PHYSICAL EVIDENCE


The physical evidence of a tourism product refers to a range of more tangible
attributes of the opera...
THANK YOU!
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SERVICE MARKETING MIX IN INDIAN SCENARIO

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  • The marketing mix is a business tool used in marketing and by marketing professionals. The marketing mix is often crucial when determining a product or brand’s offering and is often synonymous with the four P’s: price, product, promotion and place. In service marketing – like tourism, however, the four P’s have been expanded to the seven P’s to address the different nature of services. The additional three P’s in tourism are people, process and physical evidence.By taking a fresh look at these various aspects of your company you will be sure that all of your work supports your main goal – selling your services to your customer. It will also help you answer more fundamental questions such as; “who are your customers?”, “how do you reach your customers?” and “what are the needs of your customers?”, to name a few.
  • When thinking about a tourism product, it’s important to differentiate between what the customers actually buy (the promise of a product) and the product – mainly a service – that they receive after the purchase (the actual product). The purchasing decision made by the tourist is based on the promise of the product – a promise established by what she or he sees in your promotional material. This is because the tourism product – unlike a car or a computer – consists of a combination of tangible and intangible items and the potential customers “buy” the product before “acquiring” the product (we’ll dive deeper into this in our next blog post).For example, the product “Amazon Lodge” – is the combination of tangible goods (e.g. the rooms, the swimming pool, the birds) and intangible experiences (e.g. the service, the activities). Obviously, the product is thousands of miles away and you are not buying the property, therefore the actual product you buy is the promise displayed on the brochure (while the brochure is a promotional channel).
  • Placement is synonymous with distribution. It refers to providing the product at a place, which is convenient for consumers to access. In tourism, the product is not distributed to the client, but the clients travel to the product. Thus, unlike physical products, tourism distribution is more related to where you distribute the information about the service (trade shows, resellers, webpages, etc.). In the example of the brochure of the Amazon Lodge, the placement may be your office, a trade show in London or to potential customer´s houses (by direct mailing).
  • Price is what the business charges for its’ tourism product as defined by the interacting forces of supply and demand.At a practical level, tourism enterprises can determine their prices by analyzing:The cost of running the business;The willingness to pay by the demand;The prices of the competition;The commission to be provided to resellers.In tourism, two prices are often used: rack rates, which are the prices published in promotional materials – without discounts, and net prices (or net rates), which is the rack rate less the commission offered to resellers (tour operators or other intermediaries).It may also be advantageous to differentiate rates for seniors, children, off-season, etc.
  • Any person coming into contact with customers can have an impact on overall satisfaction. In tourism, people are particularly important because, in the customer’s eyes, they are generally inseparable from total service.In tourism, the human component is very important, so the attitude, skills and appearance of all people involved in the traveler’s experience needs to be first class. Some ways in which people add value to an experience, as part of the marketing mix, are training and service.
  • If tourism business offers services, the processes of the business can offer specific advantages. Processes should do more than just make life easier for the business – they must help customers get what they want.For instance, for booking a flight on the internet the process begins with the customer visiting an airline’s website. The customer enters details of the flights and books them. The customer’s ticket/booking references arrive by email (or, less and less, by post). The customer catches his flight on time and he arrives refreshed at his destination. The coming together of all the mentioned stages constitutes a marketing process.
  • Promotion is the activity of telling your market about your product. In the example of the Amazon Lodge, you are using a brochure to tell your customers about a tourism product in the Amazon.Nowadays, promotion is replaced by communications, which represents a broader focus. Communications can include advertising, public relations, personal selling, viral advertising, and any form of communication between the organization and the consumer.
  • Makes the customers perceive how the services would be like. Unlike a physical product, a service cannot be experienced before it is delivered, which makes it intangible. This, therefore, means that potential customers could perceive greater risk when deciding whether or not to use a service. To reduce the feeling of risk, thus improving the chance for success, it is vital for potential customers to see what a product would be like. This is done by providing physical evidence – displayed in photographs (of your facilities, etc.) or testimonials (what tourists write about their own previous experience).
  • SERVICE MARKETING MIX IN INDIAN SCENARIO

    1. 1. SERVICE MARKETING MIX IN INDIAN SCENARIO TEAM 8: 1.PRAMITHA 2.AKHILESH 3.MOUMITHA GHOSH 4.LIVIN 5.DILEEP M M 6.ARJUN GOWDA
    2. 2. 7 P’s
    3. 3. 7 P’s in TOURISM (in India)
    4. 4. TRAVEL & TOURISM EVOLUTION  2000 years Before Christ, in India and Mesopotamia  Travel for trade was an important feature since the beginning of civilization.  600 BC and thereafter  The earliest form of leisure tourism can be traced as far back as the Babylonian and Egyptian empires.  In India, as elsewhere, kings travelled for empire building.  500 BC, the Greek civilization  The Greek tourists travelled to sites of healing gods.  Inns were established in large towns and seaports to provide for travellers' needs.  This era also saw the birth of travel writing.  In the Middle Ages  Travel became difficult and dangerous as people travelled for business or for a sense of obligation and duty.
    5. 5.  Role of the industrial revolution in promoting travel in the west  The rapid urbanization due to industrialization led to mass immigration in cities. These people were lured into travel to escape their environment to places of natural beauty, often to the countryside they had come from change of routine from a physically and psychologically stressful jobs to a leisurely pace in countryside.  The development of the spas  The spas grew in popularity in the seventeenth century in Britain and a little later in the European Continent as awareness about the therapeutic qualities of mineral water increased.  The sun, sand and sea resorts  The sea water became associated with health benefits.  By the early eighteenth century, small fishing resorts sprung up in England
    6. 6.  Highlights of travel in the nineteenth century  Advent of railway initially catalyzed business travel and later leisure travel. Gradually special trains were chartered to only take leisure travel to their destinations.  Tourism in the Twentieth Century The birth of air travel and after
    7. 7. PRODUCT  Travel and Tourism one of the world's largest foreign exchange earner among industries, provides employment directly to millions of people worldwide and indirectly through many associated service industries.  A very wide industry, it includes:  Government tourism departments,  Immigration and customs services,   travel agencies, airlines,  tour operators,  hotels  and many associated service industries such as airline catering or laundry services, Guides, Interpreters, Tourism promotion and sales etc.
    8. 8. TYPES OF TOURISM  Leisure travel  Winter tourism  Mass tourism  Ecotourism  Recession tourism  Medical tourism  Educational tourism  Creative tourism  Dark tourism  Sports tourism  Latest trends
    9. 9. PLACE  Not only the location of the tourist attraction or facility but the location of points of sale that provides customers with access to tourist products.  Ex: I-site, Accommodation, Cafe
    10. 10. PRICE  Price is what the business charges for its’ tourism product as defined by the interacting forces of supply and demand.  At a practical level, tourism enterprises can determine their prices by analyzing:  The cost of running the business;  The willingness to pay by the demand;  The prices of the competition;  The commission to be provided to resellers.
    11. 11. PEOPLE  Traveller  Tourist Meet their expectations  Employees – Physical appearance, Knowledge, Grooming, Trained  The people who sell and service your product are an extremely important part of tourism marketing. Friendly personal service and trained employees can make or break a tourism business.  Because much of the tourism industry is based upon word of-mouth advertising particularly about the service received- what your customers say after they depart can thrust your business forward or send it into a downward spiral.
    12. 12. PROCESS   There are different types of processes involved in running a tourism business administration,  training,  planning and strategizing,  recruitment,  distribution,  purchasing and service delivery. It is important to ensure that these processes are planned and carried out properly so that operations run smoothly and problems are rectified quickly
    13. 13. PROMOTION  A range of activities can be used to convince customers to buy the product, including information kits, web sites, advertising, personal selling, sales promotion, travel shows, and public relations.  Utilize tourist information centres, such as welcome centres.  Participation with your state, regional and local tourism offices and associations.
    14. 14. PHYSICAL EVIDENCE  The physical evidence of a tourism product refers to a range of more tangible attributes of the operations. Tangibalising the product is a good way of giving positive and attractive hints or cues to potential customers with regard to the quality of the product.
    15. 15. THANK YOU!
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