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Blooming Materials: Aligning Learning, Teaching and Assessment Goals by the application of Bloom’s Taxonomy
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Blooming Materials: Aligning Learning, Teaching and Assessment Goals by the application of Bloom’s Taxonomy

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Slides from the plenary session delivered at the first Teachers Helping Teachers seminar in Manila, Philippines.

Slides from the plenary session delivered at the first Teachers Helping Teachers seminar in Manila, Philippines.

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  • 1. Blooming Materials Aligning Learning, Teaching and Assessment Goals by the application of Bloom’s Taxonomy
  • 2. Caveat! • In any study related to the brain or mind, we are using the mind to measure itself • Neurologists and biologists working at the level of the neuron do not know exactly how the brain functions • Nobody can claim this is how something works, when talking about the mind, everything is filtered through the individual’s personal experience, knowledge and perceptions of their own mind/brain and how it works for them in relation to others
  • 3. What is a taxonomy? • A taxonomy is a system of classification which provides a unique (i.e. single) point within the system for every item which is to be classified Example: the system used to identify living organisms, plants, animals, etc. identifies modern-day human beings as homo sapiens sapiens
  • 4. Why a Taxonomy for Educators? • Standards • Handling a large number of seeming vague or disconnected objectives • A framework for learning, teaching and assessing both the effectiveness of instruction and the abilities of the students
  • 5. Bloom’s Original Taxonomy • Cognitive • Knowledge • Affective • Attitudes • Psychomotor • Skills
  • 6. The Cognitive Domain Evaluation recommend, judge, summarize Synthesis create, invent, hypothesize Analysis separate, compare, analyse Application use, apply, demonstrate Comprehension write, explain, justify Knowledge define, name, describe
  • 7. Modifications to the original Note the change from Nouns to Verbs [e.g., Application to Applying] to describe the different levels of the taxonomy. Note that the top two levels are essentially exchanged from the Old to the New version. Source: http://www.odu.edu/educ/llschult/blooms_taxonomy.htm
  • 8. The Knowledge Domain The Cognitive Domain Knowledge Remembering Understanding Applying Analysing Evaluating Creating Domain 1. Knowledge of terminology Factual 2. Knowledge of specific details and elements
  • 9. The Knowledge Domain The Cognitive Domain Knowledge Remembering Understanding Applying Analysing Evaluating Creating Domain 1. Knowledge of classifications and categories Conceptual 2. Knowledge of principles and generalizations 3. Knowledge of theories, models, and structures
  • 10. The Knowledge Domain The Cognitive Domain Knowledge Remembering Understanding Applying Analysing Evaluating Creating Domain 1. Knowledge of subject-specific skills and algorithms Procedural 2. Knowledge of subject-specific techniques and methods 3. Knowledge of criteria for determining when to use appropriate procedures
  • 11. The Knowledge Domain The Cognitive Domain Knowledge Remembering Understanding Applying Analysing Evaluating Creating Domain 1. Strategic knowledge 2. Knowledge about cognitive tasks, Metacognitive including appropriate contextual and conditional knowledge 3. Self-knowledge
  • 12. The Cognitive Domain The Cognitive Domain Knowledge Domain Remember Factual Conceptual 1. Recognizing Procedural 2. Recalling Metacognitive
  • 13. The Cognitive Domain The Cognitive Domain Knowledge Domain Understand Factual 1. Interpreting 2. Exemplifying Conceptual 3. Classifying Procedural 4. Summarizing 5. Inferring Metacognitive 6. Comparing 7. Explaining
  • 14. The Cognitive Domain The Cognitive Domain Knowledge Domain Apply Factual Conceptual 1. Executing Procedural 2. Implementing Metacognitive
  • 15. The Cognitive Domain The Cognitive Domain Knowledge Domain Analyse Factual Conceptual 1. Differentiating 2. Organizing Procedural 3. Attributing Metacognitive
  • 16. The Cognitive Domain The Cognitive Domain Knowledge Domain Evaluate Factual Conceptual 1. Checking Procedural 2. Critiquing Metacognitive
  • 17. The Cognitive Domain The Cognitive Domain Knowledge Domain Create Factual Conceptual 1. Generating 2. Planning Procedural 3. Producing Metacognitive
  • 18. The “Complete” Picture The Cognitive Domain Knowledge Remember Understand Apply Analyse Evaluate Create Domain Factual List Summarize Classify Order Rank Combine Conceptual Describe Interpret Experiment Explain Assess Plan Procedural Tabulate Predict Calculate Differentiate Conclude Compose Appropriate Metacognitive use Execute Construct Achieve Action Actualize
  • 19. Why a Taxonomy for Educators? • Standards • Handling a large number of seeming vague or disconnected objectives • A framework for learning, teaching and assessing both the effectiveness of instruction and the abilities of the students
  • 20. Why a Taxonomy for Educators? Objectives • Global • All students will start school ready to learn • Educational • The ability to read musical scores • Instructional • The students learn to solve quadratic equations
  • 21. What’s the relationship? Level of Objective Global Educational Instructional Scope Broad Moderate Narrow Time needed One or more years Weeks or monthsr Hours or days to learn (often many) Purpose or Provide vision Design curriculum Plan lessons function Plan daily Plan a multi-year Plan units of activities, Example curriculum for instruction, e.g. the experiences, and elementary reading Romans in Britain exercises
  • 22. Caveat 2! • Be careful not to confuse an instructional objective with the activity used to carry it out • Compare these two teachers’ statements: My students are going to learn how dominant and recessive genes explain the differential inheritance of some characteristics in brothers and sisters My students are going on a field trip to the zoo
  • 23. Four Important Questions • Learning – What is important for students to learn in the limited school and classroom time available? • Instruction – How does one plan and deliver instruction that will result in high levels of learning for large numbers of students? • Assessment – How does one select or design assessment instruments and procedures that provide accurate information about how well students are learning? • Alignment – How does one ensure that objectives, instruction, and assessment are consistent with one another?
  • 24. Where next? • As a starting point, the online Wiki about Bloom’s Taxonomy has some useful links to click. • Anderson and Krathwohl (2001) is also very readable, whatever your position as an educator within the school system • You can e-mail me if you have any questions: colin_sumikin@yahoo.co.uk (Please put THT Phil in the subject line)