Bloom’s taxonomy

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PowerPoint presentation demonstrating how learning theories might apply to a technology-based classroom.

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Bloom’s taxonomy

  1. 1. Bloom’s Taxonomy Created by K. B.
  2. 2. Bloom’s Six Levels of Learning • Knowledge • Comprehension • Application • Analysis • Synthesis • Evaluation
  3. 3. Benjamin Bloom (1913 – 1999) • Benjamin Bloom was an Educational psychologist who researched how students learn. • He classified learning into three domains: cognitive, affective and psychomotor. • Cognitive domain is based on a student’s intelligence and what they know and how they arrange their thoughts and ideas. • Affective domain involves student’s emotions, interests, attitude, attention and awareness. • Psychomotor domain involves a student’s motor skills and their physical capabilities. • Bloom was able to identify from the cognitive domain six levels that are obtained to gain knowledge on a subject. • The levels go from easy to most difficult and are used to expand a student’s knowledge.
  4. 4. Bloom’s Taxonomy Revised • In the 1990’s, Lorin Anderson, a former student of Bloom’s updated the six steps of learning to make learning for students and teachers in the 21st century more significant. • The changes were in three broad categories: terminology, structure and emphasis. • Bloom’s categories were changed from noun to verb forms. • Knowledge being the basic form of learning, was revised to Remembering, Comprehension to Understanding, and Synthesis to Creating, as the remaining steps stayed the same. • The revised Bloom’s Taxonomy provides a powerful means to fit the needs of teachers today, and is geared towards a much broader audience.
  5. 5. Bloom’s Revised Taxonomy Remembering: Retaining information Understanding: To be able to describe facts or ideas Applying: To utilize facts in the latest manner Analyzing: To differentiate parts that are not the same Evaluating: Secure a thought or theory Creating: Design something new
  6. 6. What the Teacher and Students Can Do Under Bloom’s Taxonomy With and Without Technology • Remembering: Recalling the events in order of a particular story. • Using technology, the teacher can have the students make a timeline on Inspiration of the events of the story by using mind mapping to connect each of the story’s events as they happened in order. • Without technology, the teacher can have the students compile a list of unfamiliar words and their definitions. • Understanding: Identifying the main idea of the story. • Using technology, the teacher can have the students write in their own words on Word, the main idea of the story.
  7. 7. What the Teacher and Students Can Do Under Bloom’s Taxonomy With and Without Technology (Continued) • Without technology, the teacher will have the students draw a picture representing the main idea of the story. • Applying: Choose what elements of the story need to be changed. • Using technology, the teacher will instruct students to use the digital cameras to take a selection of photographs to demonstrate a particular point in the story that they feel needs to be changed. • Without technology, the teacher will have the students make a scrapbook that can demonstrate a particular point in the story that they feel needs to be changed.
  8. 8. What the Teacher and Students Can Do Under Bloom’s Taxonomy With and Without Technology (Continued) • Analyzing: Compare and contrast the relationship between the main character and his/her best friend in the story. • Using technology, the teacher instructs students on how to use a movie camera to survey the other students in gathering information about comparing and contrasting the main character and their best friend in the story. Take results of the survey, place the results in a spreadsheet on Excel, and make a news story from the results. • Without technology, the teacher instructs students on how design a questionnaire to gather information from other students on the relationship between the main character and his/her best friend.
  9. 9. What the Teacher and Students Can Do Under Bloom’s Taxonomy With and Without Technology (Continued) • Evaluating: Do you agree with the actions of the main character? Do you agree with the outcome of the story? • Using technology, the teacher will explain to the students that they will need to defend or disagree with the actions of the main character. They will also have to defend or dispute the outcome of the story by writing an opinion on Word about it. • Without technology, the teacher will explain to the students how they can support or dispute their feelings with a classroom debate. • Creating: How can the plot be changed or modified? • Using technology, the teacher will have the students design a book cover on Cover Creator with classroom computers and color printer. • Without technology, the teacher will show students how they can design and make puppets from paper mache, write a script, and present a puppet show of the story to the classroom.
  10. 10. Final Thought I believe that Bloom’s Taxonomy will be a very helpful tool in my own teaching because as a teacher, I will be responsible to give my students the best possible education that I can. By following Bloom’s steps, I can get students to dig deeper into what they are learning and they will be able to retain what they have learned by using technology to help the learning process. It is very exciting and very rewarding when a student shows enthusiasm and pride when they enjoy what they are doing. Learning with Bloom’s Taxonomy not only helps increase critical thinking skills and higher order thinking skills, it helps your brain to grow stronger. I can’t think of anything better for students, can you?
  11. 11. Credits Forehand, M. (2005). Bloom's taxonomy: Original and revised.. In M.Orey (Ed.), Emerging perspectives on learning, teaching, and technology. Retrieved April 11, 2014 , fromhttp://projects.coe.uga.edu/epltt/ Shelly, G. B., Gunter, G. A., & Gunter, R. E. (2013).Special feature: learning theories and educational research. (Vol. 5, pp. 257-280). Boston: Cengage Technology. DOI: www.cengage.com/course technology. Images: • http://redie.uabc.mx/contenido/vol6no2/art-104-spa/bloom.png • http://juliaec.files.wordpress.com/2011/04/blooms_taxonomy.jpg • http://www.odu.edu/educ/roverbau/Bloom/blooms_taxonomy.ht m

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