SlideShare a Scribd company logo
1 of 48
Download to read offline
Understanding the Revised
Version of Bloom’s
Taxonomy
Glyn B. Vertudazo
BLOOM’ S 1 9 5 6 TA XONOMY
Benjamin Bloom created a taxonomy of measurable verbs to
help us describe and classify observable knowledge, skills,
attitudes, behaviors and abilities.
The theory is based upon the idea that there are levels of
observable actions that indicate something is happening in the
brain (cognitive activity.) By creating learning objectives using
measurable verbs, you indicate explicitly what the student
must do in order to demonstrate learning.
http://www.llcc.edu/celt/FacultyDevelopment/Handouts/tabid/3938/Default.aspx
Bloom’s Taxonomy
• Taxonomy of Cognitive Objectives
• Developed in 1950’s
• Means of expressing qualitatively different kinds of thinking
• Been adapted for classroom use as a planning tool
• Continues to be one of the most universally applied models
• Provides a way to organize thinking skills into six levels, from the most
basic to the more complex levels of thinking
Who are Anderson and Krathwohl?
• These gentlemen are the primary authors of the revisions to
what had become known as Bloom’s Taxonomy — an
ordering of cognitive skills.
• Both of these primary authors were in a perfect position to
orchestrate looking at the classic taxonomy critically.
• They called together a group of educational psychologists
and educators to help them with the revisions.
• Lorin Anderson was once a student of the famed Benjamin
Bloom, and
• David Krathwohl was one of Bloom’s partners as he devised
his classic cognitive taxonomy.
• Their combined efforts led to Bloom’s Taxonomy revised.
Change in Terms
• The names of six major categories were changed from noun to verb forms.
• As the taxonomy reflects different forms of thinking and thinking is an
active process verbs were used rather than nouns.
• The subcategories of the six major categories were also replaced by verbs
and some subcategories were reorganized.
• The knowledge category was renamed. Knowledge is an outcome or
product of thinking not a form of thinking per se. Consequently, the word
knowledge was inappropriate to describe a category of thinking and was
replaced with the word remembering instead.
• Comprehension and synthesis were retitled to understanding and creating
respectively, in order to better reflect the nature of the thinking defined in
each category.
http://rite.ed.qut.edu.au/oz-teachernet/training/bloom.htm
l
Change in Emphasis
• The revision's primary focus was on the taxonomy in use. Essentially,
this means that the revised taxonomy is a more authentic tool for
curriculum planning, instructional delivery and assessment.
• The revision is aimed at a broader audience. Bloom’s Taxonomy was
traditionally viewed as a tool best applied in the earlier years of
schooling (i.e. primary and junior primary years). The revised taxonomy
is more universal and easily applicable at elementary, secondary and
even tertiary levels.
• The revision emphasizes explanation and description of
subcategories.
Why Use Bloom’s Taxonomy?
• Objectives (learning goals) are important to establish in a pedagogical
interchange so that teachers and students alike understand the
purpose of that interchange.
• Organizing objectives helps to clarify objectives for themselves and
for students.
• Having an organized set of objectives helps teachers to:
• “plan and deliver appropriate instruction”;
• “design valid assessment tasks and strategies”; and
• “ensure that instruction and assessment are aligned with the objectives.”
Educational Objectives:
A statement of a learning objective contains a verb (an action) and an
object (usually a noun).
• The verb generally refers to [actions associated with] the
intended cognitive process.
• The object generally describes the knowledge students are expected
to acquire or construct.
(Anderson and Krathwohl, 2001, pp. 4–5)
Cognitive Process Dimension
The cognitive process dimension represents a continuum of increasing
cognitive complexity—from remember to create.
Anderson and Krathwohl identify 19 specific cognitive processes that
further clarify the bounds of the six categories.
Table 1. The Cognitive Process Dimension – categories, cognitive processes (and
alternative names)
Knowledge Dimension
The knowledge dimension represents a range from concrete (factual)
to abstract (metacognitive).
Representation of the knowledge dimension as a number of discrete
steps can be a bit misleading.
For example, all procedural knowledge may not be more abstract than
all conceptual knowledge. And metacognitive knowledge is a special
case. In this model, “metacognitive knowledge is knowledge of [one’s
own] cognition and about oneself in relation to various subject matters
. . . ”
(Anderson and Krathwohl, 2001, p. 44).
Dimension Definition
Factual Knowledge The basic elements students must know
to be acquainted with a discipline or
solve problems in it
Conceptual Knowledge The interrelationships among the basic
elements within a larger structure that
enable them to function together
Procedural Knowledge How to do something, methods of
inquiry, and criteria for using skills,
algorithms, techniques, and methods
Metacognitive Knowledge Knowledge of cognition in general as
well as awareness and knowledge of
one’s own cognition
Table 2. The Knowledge Dimension
Factual
• knowledge of
terminology
• knowledge of
specific details and
elements
Conceptual
• knowledge of
classifications and
categories
• knowledge of
principles and
generalizations
• knowledge of
theories, models,
and structures
Procedural
• knowledge of
subject-specific
skills and
algorithms
• knowledge of
subject-specific
techniques and
methods
• knowledge of
criteria for
determining when
to use appropriate
procedures
Metacognitive
• strategic
knowledge
• knowledge about
cognitive tasks,
including
appropriate
contextual and
conditional
knowledge
• self-knowledge
Bloom's Revised Taxonomy Model
Note:
These are learning objectives – not learning activities.
It may be useful to think of preceding each objective with something
like, “students will be able to…:
Detailed Potential Activities and
Products
Remembering
• Make a list of the main events of the story.
•Make a time line of events.
•Make a facts chart.
•Write a list of any pieces of information you can remember.
•What animals were in the story?
•Make a chart showing…
•Make an acrostic.
•Recite a poem.
Understanding
•Cut out, or draw pictures to show a particular event.
•Illustrate what you think the main idea may have been.
•Make a cartoon strip showing the sequence of events.
•Write and perform a play based on the story.
•Retell the story in your own words.
•Write a summary report of the event
•Prepare a flow chart to illustrate the sequence of events.
•Make a coloring book.
•Cut out, or draw pictures to show a particular event. Illustrate what you think the main idea was
.•Make a cartoon strip showing the sequence of events.
•Write and perform a play based on the story.
•Retell the story in your own words.
•Write a summary report of the event
•Prepare a flow chart to illustrate the sequence of events.
•Cut out, or draw pictures to show a particular event. Illustrate what you think the main idea was.
•Make a cartoon strip showing the sequence of events.
•Write and perform a play based on the story.
Applying
•Construct a model to demonstrate how it works
•Make a diorama to illustrate an event
•Make a scrapbook about the areas of study.
•Make a papier-mache map / clay model to include relevant information
about an event.
•Take a collection of photographs to demonstrate a particular point.
•Make up a puzzle or a game about the topic.
•Write a textbook about this topic for others.
•Dress a doll in national costume.
•Make a clay model.
•Paint a mural using the same materials.
•Design a marketing strategy for your product using a known strategy as a
model.
Analyzing
•Design a questionnaire to gather information.
•Write a commercial to sell a new product
•Make a flow chart to show the critical stages.
•Construct a graph to illustrate selected information.
•Make a family tree showing relationships.
•Devise a play about the study area.
•Write a biography of a person studied.
•Prepare a report about the area of study.
•Conduct an investigation to produce information to support a view.
•Review a work of art in terms of form, color and texture.
Evaluating
•Prepare a list of criteria to judge…
•Conduct a debate about an issue of special interest.
•Make a booklet about five rules you see as important. Convince
others.
•Form a panel to discuss views.
•Write a letter to. ..advising on changes needed.
•Write a half-yearly report.
•Prepare a case to present your view about...
Creating
•Invent a machine to do a specific task.
•Design a building to house your study.
•Create a new product. Give it a name and plan a marketing campaign.
•Write about your feelings in relation to...
•Write a TV show play, puppet show, role play, song or pantomime
about..
•Design a record, book or magazine cover for...
•Sell an idea
•Devise a way to...
•Make up a new language and use it in an example.
Assessment Questions
(Pohl, Learning to Think, Thinking to Learn, p. 12)
Remembering
•What happened after...?
•How many...?
•What is...?
•Who was it that...?
•Can you name ...?
•Find the meaning of…
•Describe what happened after…
•Who spoke to...?
•Which is true or false...?
Understanding
•Can you write in your own words?
•How would you explain…?
•Can you write a brief outline...?
•What do you think could have happened next...?
•Who do you think...?
•What was the main idea...?
•Can you clarify…?
•Can you illustrate…?
•Does everyone act in the way that …….. does?
Applying
•Do you know of another instance where…?
•Can you group by characteristics such as…?
•Which factors would you change if…?
•What questions would you ask of…?
•From the information given, can you develop a set of instructions
about…?
Analysing
•Which events could not have happened?
•If. ..happened, what might the ending have been?
•How is...similar to...?
•What do you see as other possible outcomes?
•Why did...changes occur?
•Can you explain what must have happened when...?
•What are some or the problems of...?
•Can you distinguish between...?
•What were some of the motives behind..?
•What was the turning point?
•What was the problem with...?
Evaluating
•Is there a better solution to...?
•Judge the value of... What do you think about...?
•Can you defend your position about...?
•Do you think...is a good or bad thing?
•How would you have handled...?
•What changes to.. would you recommend?
•Do you believe...? How would you feel if. ..?
•How effective are. ..?
•What are the consequences..?
•What influence will....have on our lives?
•What are the pros and cons of....?
•Why is ....of value?
•What are the alternatives?
•Who will gain & who will loose?
Creating
•Can you design a...to...?
•Can you see a possible solution to...?
•If you had access to all resources, how would you deal with...?
•Why don't you devise your own way to...?
•What would happen if ...?
•How many ways can you...?
•Can you create new and unusual uses for...?
•Can you develop a proposal which would...?
References:
http://www.kurwongbss.qld.edu.au/thinking/Bloom/blooms.html
http://coe.sdsu.edu/eet/articles/bloomrev/index.htm
http://rite.ed.qut.edu.au/oz-teachernet/training/bloom.html
http://www.llcc.edu/celt/FacultyDevelopment/Handouts/tabid/3938/D
efault.aspx
https://www.celt.iastate.edu/teaching/effective-teaching-
practices/revised-blooms-taxonomy/
https://thesecondprinciple.com/essential-teaching-skills/blooms-
taxonomy-revised/

More Related Content

What's hot

Revised bloom`s taxonomy ppt
Revised bloom`s taxonomy pptRevised bloom`s taxonomy ppt
Revised bloom`s taxonomy pptcandyvdv
 
Placement & diagnostic assessment
Placement & diagnostic assessmentPlacement & diagnostic assessment
Placement & diagnostic assessmentHadeeqaTanveer
 
Differentiated Assessment Meaning and Significance
Differentiated Assessment Meaning and SignificanceDifferentiated Assessment Meaning and Significance
Differentiated Assessment Meaning and SignificanceSuresh Babu
 
Cognitive Domain(Bloom Taxonomy) In Curriculum Development
Cognitive Domain(Bloom Taxonomy) In Curriculum DevelopmentCognitive Domain(Bloom Taxonomy) In Curriculum Development
Cognitive Domain(Bloom Taxonomy) In Curriculum DevelopmentTasneem Ahmad
 
Tyler model of curriculum development
Tyler model of curriculum developmentTyler model of curriculum development
Tyler model of curriculum developmentHadeeqaTanveer
 
Bloom’s Revised Taxonomy of Educational Objectives
Bloom’s Revised Taxonomy of Educational ObjectivesBloom’s Revised Taxonomy of Educational Objectives
Bloom’s Revised Taxonomy of Educational ObjectivesEzr Acelar
 
TOOLS AND TECHNIQUES FOR CLASSROOM ASSESSMENT
TOOLS AND  TECHNIQUES FOR CLASSROOM ASSESSMENTTOOLS AND  TECHNIQUES FOR CLASSROOM ASSESSMENT
TOOLS AND TECHNIQUES FOR CLASSROOM ASSESSMENTVijayalakshmi Murugesan
 
Assessment Of Student Learning
Assessment Of Student LearningAssessment Of Student Learning
Assessment Of Student LearningArlan Villanueva
 
Chapter 7 evaluation eisner model
Chapter 7 evaluation eisner modelChapter 7 evaluation eisner model
Chapter 7 evaluation eisner modelMARY JEAN DACALLOS
 
Instructional Material and its Kinds
Instructional Material and its KindsInstructional Material and its Kinds
Instructional Material and its KindsRyanBuer
 
Assessment in Affective domain
Assessment in Affective domainAssessment in Affective domain
Assessment in Affective domainGrays Zilla
 
Bloom’s taxonomy of educational objectives
Bloom’s taxonomy of educational objectives Bloom’s taxonomy of educational objectives
Bloom’s taxonomy of educational objectives Ancy Shyju
 
Types of Assessment Maximum and Typical performance
Types of Assessment Maximum and Typical performanceTypes of Assessment Maximum and Typical performance
Types of Assessment Maximum and Typical performanceHadeeqaTanveer
 
Sternberg’s Successful Intelligence Theory and WICS Model, Problem Solving an...
Sternberg’s Successful Intelligence Theory and WICS Model, Problem Solving an...Sternberg’s Successful Intelligence Theory and WICS Model, Problem Solving an...
Sternberg’s Successful Intelligence Theory and WICS Model, Problem Solving an...Ida Lyn Azuelo
 
Curriculum development model:tyler model
Curriculum  development model:tyler model Curriculum  development model:tyler model
Curriculum development model:tyler model ahmedabbas1121
 

What's hot (20)

Revised bloom`s taxonomy ppt
Revised bloom`s taxonomy pptRevised bloom`s taxonomy ppt
Revised bloom`s taxonomy ppt
 
Placement & diagnostic assessment
Placement & diagnostic assessmentPlacement & diagnostic assessment
Placement & diagnostic assessment
 
Differentiated Assessment Meaning and Significance
Differentiated Assessment Meaning and SignificanceDifferentiated Assessment Meaning and Significance
Differentiated Assessment Meaning and Significance
 
Cognitive Domain(Bloom Taxonomy) In Curriculum Development
Cognitive Domain(Bloom Taxonomy) In Curriculum DevelopmentCognitive Domain(Bloom Taxonomy) In Curriculum Development
Cognitive Domain(Bloom Taxonomy) In Curriculum Development
 
Tyler model of curriculum development
Tyler model of curriculum developmentTyler model of curriculum development
Tyler model of curriculum development
 
Bloom’s Revised Taxonomy of Educational Objectives
Bloom’s Revised Taxonomy of Educational ObjectivesBloom’s Revised Taxonomy of Educational Objectives
Bloom’s Revised Taxonomy of Educational Objectives
 
Purpose of classroom test
Purpose of classroom testPurpose of classroom test
Purpose of classroom test
 
TOOLS AND TECHNIQUES FOR CLASSROOM ASSESSMENT
TOOLS AND  TECHNIQUES FOR CLASSROOM ASSESSMENTTOOLS AND  TECHNIQUES FOR CLASSROOM ASSESSMENT
TOOLS AND TECHNIQUES FOR CLASSROOM ASSESSMENT
 
Types of evaluation
Types of evaluationTypes of evaluation
Types of evaluation
 
Assessment Of Student Learning
Assessment Of Student LearningAssessment Of Student Learning
Assessment Of Student Learning
 
Chapter 7 evaluation eisner model
Chapter 7 evaluation eisner modelChapter 7 evaluation eisner model
Chapter 7 evaluation eisner model
 
Instructional Material and its Kinds
Instructional Material and its KindsInstructional Material and its Kinds
Instructional Material and its Kinds
 
Lesson-4-EDUC-5GROUP-3 (1).pptx
Lesson-4-EDUC-5GROUP-3 (1).pptxLesson-4-EDUC-5GROUP-3 (1).pptx
Lesson-4-EDUC-5GROUP-3 (1).pptx
 
Taba model of curriculum development
Taba model of curriculum developmentTaba model of curriculum development
Taba model of curriculum development
 
Assessment in Affective domain
Assessment in Affective domainAssessment in Affective domain
Assessment in Affective domain
 
Construction of Test
Construction of TestConstruction of Test
Construction of Test
 
Bloom’s taxonomy of educational objectives
Bloom’s taxonomy of educational objectives Bloom’s taxonomy of educational objectives
Bloom’s taxonomy of educational objectives
 
Types of Assessment Maximum and Typical performance
Types of Assessment Maximum and Typical performanceTypes of Assessment Maximum and Typical performance
Types of Assessment Maximum and Typical performance
 
Sternberg’s Successful Intelligence Theory and WICS Model, Problem Solving an...
Sternberg’s Successful Intelligence Theory and WICS Model, Problem Solving an...Sternberg’s Successful Intelligence Theory and WICS Model, Problem Solving an...
Sternberg’s Successful Intelligence Theory and WICS Model, Problem Solving an...
 
Curriculum development model:tyler model
Curriculum  development model:tyler model Curriculum  development model:tyler model
Curriculum development model:tyler model
 

Similar to Revised Bloom's Taxonomy

Blooms presentation
Blooms presentationBlooms presentation
Blooms presentationjschiele
 
New Bloom Cognitive
New  Bloom  CognitiveNew  Bloom  Cognitive
New Bloom CognitiveBank Miko
 
New Bloom Cognitive
New  Bloom  CognitiveNew  Bloom  Cognitive
New Bloom CognitiveBank Miko
 
New bloom cognitive
New bloom cognitive New bloom cognitive
New bloom cognitive Bank Miko
 
7. bloom's revised taxonomy.ppt
7. bloom's revised taxonomy.ppt7. bloom's revised taxonomy.ppt
7. bloom's revised taxonomy.pptFroilanTindugan2
 
Bloom's abridged revised taxonomy
Bloom's abridged revised taxonomyBloom's abridged revised taxonomy
Bloom's abridged revised taxonomyMaida Ali
 
Taxonomy bloom
Taxonomy bloomTaxonomy bloom
Taxonomy bloomAdila Dila
 
Enc1102 drafting research paper
Enc1102 drafting research paperEnc1102 drafting research paper
Enc1102 drafting research paperHeather Wayne
 
5 bloom's revised version
5 bloom's revised version 5 bloom's revised version
5 bloom's revised version Sa Je La
 
Critical thinking skills 3333333
Critical thinking skills 3333333Critical thinking skills 3333333
Critical thinking skills 3333333norahalghamdi2
 
Objectives n learning outcoms - MD 20240404.pptx
Objectives n learning outcoms - MD 20240404.pptxObjectives n learning outcoms - MD 20240404.pptx
Objectives n learning outcoms - MD 20240404.pptxMadhavi Dharankar
 
Reflectivelearningcriticalthinking 150217022909-conversion-gate01
Reflectivelearningcriticalthinking 150217022909-conversion-gate01Reflectivelearningcriticalthinking 150217022909-conversion-gate01
Reflectivelearningcriticalthinking 150217022909-conversion-gate01jamal shah
 

Similar to Revised Bloom's Taxonomy (20)

Blooms presentation
Blooms presentationBlooms presentation
Blooms presentation
 
New Bloom Cognitive
New  Bloom  CognitiveNew  Bloom  Cognitive
New Bloom Cognitive
 
New Bloom Cognitive
New  Bloom  CognitiveNew  Bloom  Cognitive
New Bloom Cognitive
 
New bloom cognitive
New bloom cognitive New bloom cognitive
New bloom cognitive
 
Learning Objectives
Learning ObjectivesLearning Objectives
Learning Objectives
 
7. bloom's revised taxonomy.ppt
7. bloom's revised taxonomy.ppt7. bloom's revised taxonomy.ppt
7. bloom's revised taxonomy.ppt
 
Bloom's abridged revised taxonomy
Bloom's abridged revised taxonomyBloom's abridged revised taxonomy
Bloom's abridged revised taxonomy
 
Developing a thinking School
Developing a thinking SchoolDeveloping a thinking School
Developing a thinking School
 
Taxonomy bloom
Taxonomy bloomTaxonomy bloom
Taxonomy bloom
 
bloomspres.ppt
bloomspres.pptbloomspres.ppt
bloomspres.ppt
 
Bloomspres
BloomspresBloomspres
Bloomspres
 
Bloom's Taxonomy
Bloom's TaxonomyBloom's Taxonomy
Bloom's Taxonomy
 
Bloom's taxonomy
Bloom's taxonomyBloom's taxonomy
Bloom's taxonomy
 
Enc1102 drafting research paper
Enc1102 drafting research paperEnc1102 drafting research paper
Enc1102 drafting research paper
 
5 bloom's revised version
5 bloom's revised version 5 bloom's revised version
5 bloom's revised version
 
Critical thinking skills 3333333
Critical thinking skills 3333333Critical thinking skills 3333333
Critical thinking skills 3333333
 
Bloomspres
BloomspresBloomspres
Bloomspres
 
Objectives n learning outcoms - MD 20240404.pptx
Objectives n learning outcoms - MD 20240404.pptxObjectives n learning outcoms - MD 20240404.pptx
Objectives n learning outcoms - MD 20240404.pptx
 
Reflectivelearningcriticalthinking 150217022909-conversion-gate01
Reflectivelearningcriticalthinking 150217022909-conversion-gate01Reflectivelearningcriticalthinking 150217022909-conversion-gate01
Reflectivelearningcriticalthinking 150217022909-conversion-gate01
 
developing courses.pdf
developing courses.pdfdeveloping courses.pdf
developing courses.pdf
 

Recently uploaded

CLASSIFICATION OF ANTI - CANCER DRUGS.pptx
CLASSIFICATION OF ANTI - CANCER DRUGS.pptxCLASSIFICATION OF ANTI - CANCER DRUGS.pptx
CLASSIFICATION OF ANTI - CANCER DRUGS.pptxAnupam32727
 
DBMSArchitecture_QueryProcessingandOptimization.pdf
DBMSArchitecture_QueryProcessingandOptimization.pdfDBMSArchitecture_QueryProcessingandOptimization.pdf
DBMSArchitecture_QueryProcessingandOptimization.pdfChristalin Nelson
 
18. Training and prunning of horicultural crops.pptx
18. Training and prunning of horicultural crops.pptx18. Training and prunning of horicultural crops.pptx
18. Training and prunning of horicultural crops.pptxUmeshTimilsina1
 
Jason Potel In Media Res Media Component
Jason Potel In Media Res Media ComponentJason Potel In Media Res Media Component
Jason Potel In Media Res Media ComponentInMediaRes1
 
(Part 1) CHILDREN'S DISABILITIES AND EXCEPTIONALITIES.pdf
(Part 1) CHILDREN'S DISABILITIES AND EXCEPTIONALITIES.pdf(Part 1) CHILDREN'S DISABILITIES AND EXCEPTIONALITIES.pdf
(Part 1) CHILDREN'S DISABILITIES AND EXCEPTIONALITIES.pdfMJDuyan
 
6 ways Samsung’s Interactive Display powered by Android changes the classroom
6 ways Samsung’s Interactive Display powered by Android changes the classroom6 ways Samsung’s Interactive Display powered by Android changes the classroom
6 ways Samsung’s Interactive Display powered by Android changes the classroomSamsung Business USA
 
Sarah Lahm In Media Res Media Component
Sarah Lahm  In Media Res Media ComponentSarah Lahm  In Media Res Media Component
Sarah Lahm In Media Res Media ComponentInMediaRes1
 
Shark introduction Morphology and its behaviour characteristics
Shark introduction Morphology and its behaviour characteristicsShark introduction Morphology and its behaviour characteristics
Shark introduction Morphology and its behaviour characteristicsArubSultan
 
Scientific Writing :Research Discourse
Scientific  Writing :Research  DiscourseScientific  Writing :Research  Discourse
Scientific Writing :Research DiscourseAnita GoswamiGiri
 
(Part 2) CHILDREN'S DISABILITIES AND EXCEPTIONALITIES.pdf
(Part 2) CHILDREN'S DISABILITIES AND EXCEPTIONALITIES.pdf(Part 2) CHILDREN'S DISABILITIES AND EXCEPTIONALITIES.pdf
(Part 2) CHILDREN'S DISABILITIES AND EXCEPTIONALITIES.pdfMJDuyan
 
Supply agency market - aiming high 2.pdf
Supply agency market - aiming high 2.pdfSupply agency market - aiming high 2.pdf
Supply agency market - aiming high 2.pdftomeskell101
 
HackerOne X IoT Lab Bug Bounty 101 with Encryptsaan & IoT Lab at KIIT Univers...
HackerOne X IoT Lab Bug Bounty 101 with Encryptsaan & IoT Lab at KIIT Univers...HackerOne X IoT Lab Bug Bounty 101 with Encryptsaan & IoT Lab at KIIT Univers...
HackerOne X IoT Lab Bug Bounty 101 with Encryptsaan & IoT Lab at KIIT Univers...kumarpriyanshu81
 
4.9.24 School Desegregation in Boston.pptx
4.9.24 School Desegregation in Boston.pptx4.9.24 School Desegregation in Boston.pptx
4.9.24 School Desegregation in Boston.pptxmary850239
 
Farrington HS Streamlines Guest Entrance
Farrington HS Streamlines Guest EntranceFarrington HS Streamlines Guest Entrance
Farrington HS Streamlines Guest Entrancejulius27264
 
Self directed Learning - SDL, introduction to SDL
Self directed Learning - SDL, introduction to SDLSelf directed Learning - SDL, introduction to SDL
Self directed Learning - SDL, introduction to SDLspmdoc
 
Advancing Gender Equality The Crucial Role of Science and Technology 4 April ...
Advancing Gender Equality The Crucial Role of Science and Technology 4 April ...Advancing Gender Equality The Crucial Role of Science and Technology 4 April ...
Advancing Gender Equality The Crucial Role of Science and Technology 4 April ...EduSkills OECD
 
How to create _name_search function in odoo 17
How to create _name_search function in odoo 17How to create _name_search function in odoo 17
How to create _name_search function in odoo 17Celine George
 
Sulphonamides, mechanisms and their uses
Sulphonamides, mechanisms and their usesSulphonamides, mechanisms and their uses
Sulphonamides, mechanisms and their usesVijayaLaxmi84
 
16. Discovery, function and commercial uses of different PGRS.pptx
16. Discovery, function and commercial uses of different PGRS.pptx16. Discovery, function and commercial uses of different PGRS.pptx
16. Discovery, function and commercial uses of different PGRS.pptxUmeshTimilsina1
 

Recently uploaded (20)

CLASSIFICATION OF ANTI - CANCER DRUGS.pptx
CLASSIFICATION OF ANTI - CANCER DRUGS.pptxCLASSIFICATION OF ANTI - CANCER DRUGS.pptx
CLASSIFICATION OF ANTI - CANCER DRUGS.pptx
 
DBMSArchitecture_QueryProcessingandOptimization.pdf
DBMSArchitecture_QueryProcessingandOptimization.pdfDBMSArchitecture_QueryProcessingandOptimization.pdf
DBMSArchitecture_QueryProcessingandOptimization.pdf
 
18. Training and prunning of horicultural crops.pptx
18. Training and prunning of horicultural crops.pptx18. Training and prunning of horicultural crops.pptx
18. Training and prunning of horicultural crops.pptx
 
Jason Potel In Media Res Media Component
Jason Potel In Media Res Media ComponentJason Potel In Media Res Media Component
Jason Potel In Media Res Media Component
 
(Part 1) CHILDREN'S DISABILITIES AND EXCEPTIONALITIES.pdf
(Part 1) CHILDREN'S DISABILITIES AND EXCEPTIONALITIES.pdf(Part 1) CHILDREN'S DISABILITIES AND EXCEPTIONALITIES.pdf
(Part 1) CHILDREN'S DISABILITIES AND EXCEPTIONALITIES.pdf
 
6 ways Samsung’s Interactive Display powered by Android changes the classroom
6 ways Samsung’s Interactive Display powered by Android changes the classroom6 ways Samsung’s Interactive Display powered by Android changes the classroom
6 ways Samsung’s Interactive Display powered by Android changes the classroom
 
Sarah Lahm In Media Res Media Component
Sarah Lahm  In Media Res Media ComponentSarah Lahm  In Media Res Media Component
Sarah Lahm In Media Res Media Component
 
Shark introduction Morphology and its behaviour characteristics
Shark introduction Morphology and its behaviour characteristicsShark introduction Morphology and its behaviour characteristics
Shark introduction Morphology and its behaviour characteristics
 
Scientific Writing :Research Discourse
Scientific  Writing :Research  DiscourseScientific  Writing :Research  Discourse
Scientific Writing :Research Discourse
 
(Part 2) CHILDREN'S DISABILITIES AND EXCEPTIONALITIES.pdf
(Part 2) CHILDREN'S DISABILITIES AND EXCEPTIONALITIES.pdf(Part 2) CHILDREN'S DISABILITIES AND EXCEPTIONALITIES.pdf
(Part 2) CHILDREN'S DISABILITIES AND EXCEPTIONALITIES.pdf
 
Supply agency market - aiming high 2.pdf
Supply agency market - aiming high 2.pdfSupply agency market - aiming high 2.pdf
Supply agency market - aiming high 2.pdf
 
HackerOne X IoT Lab Bug Bounty 101 with Encryptsaan & IoT Lab at KIIT Univers...
HackerOne X IoT Lab Bug Bounty 101 with Encryptsaan & IoT Lab at KIIT Univers...HackerOne X IoT Lab Bug Bounty 101 with Encryptsaan & IoT Lab at KIIT Univers...
HackerOne X IoT Lab Bug Bounty 101 with Encryptsaan & IoT Lab at KIIT Univers...
 
4.9.24 School Desegregation in Boston.pptx
4.9.24 School Desegregation in Boston.pptx4.9.24 School Desegregation in Boston.pptx
4.9.24 School Desegregation in Boston.pptx
 
Farrington HS Streamlines Guest Entrance
Farrington HS Streamlines Guest EntranceFarrington HS Streamlines Guest Entrance
Farrington HS Streamlines Guest Entrance
 
Self directed Learning - SDL, introduction to SDL
Self directed Learning - SDL, introduction to SDLSelf directed Learning - SDL, introduction to SDL
Self directed Learning - SDL, introduction to SDL
 
Advancing Gender Equality The Crucial Role of Science and Technology 4 April ...
Advancing Gender Equality The Crucial Role of Science and Technology 4 April ...Advancing Gender Equality The Crucial Role of Science and Technology 4 April ...
Advancing Gender Equality The Crucial Role of Science and Technology 4 April ...
 
How to create _name_search function in odoo 17
How to create _name_search function in odoo 17How to create _name_search function in odoo 17
How to create _name_search function in odoo 17
 
Sulphonamides, mechanisms and their uses
Sulphonamides, mechanisms and their usesSulphonamides, mechanisms and their uses
Sulphonamides, mechanisms and their uses
 
16. Discovery, function and commercial uses of different PGRS.pptx
16. Discovery, function and commercial uses of different PGRS.pptx16. Discovery, function and commercial uses of different PGRS.pptx
16. Discovery, function and commercial uses of different PGRS.pptx
 
Chi-Square Test Non Parametric Test Categorical Variable
Chi-Square Test Non Parametric Test Categorical VariableChi-Square Test Non Parametric Test Categorical Variable
Chi-Square Test Non Parametric Test Categorical Variable
 

Revised Bloom's Taxonomy

  • 1. Understanding the Revised Version of Bloom’s Taxonomy Glyn B. Vertudazo
  • 2. BLOOM’ S 1 9 5 6 TA XONOMY Benjamin Bloom created a taxonomy of measurable verbs to help us describe and classify observable knowledge, skills, attitudes, behaviors and abilities. The theory is based upon the idea that there are levels of observable actions that indicate something is happening in the brain (cognitive activity.) By creating learning objectives using measurable verbs, you indicate explicitly what the student must do in order to demonstrate learning. http://www.llcc.edu/celt/FacultyDevelopment/Handouts/tabid/3938/Default.aspx
  • 3. Bloom’s Taxonomy • Taxonomy of Cognitive Objectives • Developed in 1950’s • Means of expressing qualitatively different kinds of thinking • Been adapted for classroom use as a planning tool • Continues to be one of the most universally applied models • Provides a way to organize thinking skills into six levels, from the most basic to the more complex levels of thinking
  • 4.
  • 5. Who are Anderson and Krathwohl? • These gentlemen are the primary authors of the revisions to what had become known as Bloom’s Taxonomy — an ordering of cognitive skills. • Both of these primary authors were in a perfect position to orchestrate looking at the classic taxonomy critically. • They called together a group of educational psychologists and educators to help them with the revisions. • Lorin Anderson was once a student of the famed Benjamin Bloom, and • David Krathwohl was one of Bloom’s partners as he devised his classic cognitive taxonomy. • Their combined efforts led to Bloom’s Taxonomy revised.
  • 6. Change in Terms • The names of six major categories were changed from noun to verb forms. • As the taxonomy reflects different forms of thinking and thinking is an active process verbs were used rather than nouns. • The subcategories of the six major categories were also replaced by verbs and some subcategories were reorganized. • The knowledge category was renamed. Knowledge is an outcome or product of thinking not a form of thinking per se. Consequently, the word knowledge was inappropriate to describe a category of thinking and was replaced with the word remembering instead. • Comprehension and synthesis were retitled to understanding and creating respectively, in order to better reflect the nature of the thinking defined in each category. http://rite.ed.qut.edu.au/oz-teachernet/training/bloom.htm l
  • 7. Change in Emphasis • The revision's primary focus was on the taxonomy in use. Essentially, this means that the revised taxonomy is a more authentic tool for curriculum planning, instructional delivery and assessment. • The revision is aimed at a broader audience. Bloom’s Taxonomy was traditionally viewed as a tool best applied in the earlier years of schooling (i.e. primary and junior primary years). The revised taxonomy is more universal and easily applicable at elementary, secondary and even tertiary levels. • The revision emphasizes explanation and description of subcategories.
  • 8.
  • 9. Why Use Bloom’s Taxonomy? • Objectives (learning goals) are important to establish in a pedagogical interchange so that teachers and students alike understand the purpose of that interchange. • Organizing objectives helps to clarify objectives for themselves and for students. • Having an organized set of objectives helps teachers to: • “plan and deliver appropriate instruction”; • “design valid assessment tasks and strategies”; and • “ensure that instruction and assessment are aligned with the objectives.”
  • 10. Educational Objectives: A statement of a learning objective contains a verb (an action) and an object (usually a noun). • The verb generally refers to [actions associated with] the intended cognitive process. • The object generally describes the knowledge students are expected to acquire or construct. (Anderson and Krathwohl, 2001, pp. 4–5)
  • 11. Cognitive Process Dimension The cognitive process dimension represents a continuum of increasing cognitive complexity—from remember to create. Anderson and Krathwohl identify 19 specific cognitive processes that further clarify the bounds of the six categories.
  • 12. Table 1. The Cognitive Process Dimension – categories, cognitive processes (and alternative names)
  • 13. Knowledge Dimension The knowledge dimension represents a range from concrete (factual) to abstract (metacognitive). Representation of the knowledge dimension as a number of discrete steps can be a bit misleading. For example, all procedural knowledge may not be more abstract than all conceptual knowledge. And metacognitive knowledge is a special case. In this model, “metacognitive knowledge is knowledge of [one’s own] cognition and about oneself in relation to various subject matters . . . ” (Anderson and Krathwohl, 2001, p. 44).
  • 14. Dimension Definition Factual Knowledge The basic elements students must know to be acquainted with a discipline or solve problems in it Conceptual Knowledge The interrelationships among the basic elements within a larger structure that enable them to function together Procedural Knowledge How to do something, methods of inquiry, and criteria for using skills, algorithms, techniques, and methods Metacognitive Knowledge Knowledge of cognition in general as well as awareness and knowledge of one’s own cognition
  • 15. Table 2. The Knowledge Dimension Factual • knowledge of terminology • knowledge of specific details and elements Conceptual • knowledge of classifications and categories • knowledge of principles and generalizations • knowledge of theories, models, and structures Procedural • knowledge of subject-specific skills and algorithms • knowledge of subject-specific techniques and methods • knowledge of criteria for determining when to use appropriate procedures Metacognitive • strategic knowledge • knowledge about cognitive tasks, including appropriate contextual and conditional knowledge • self-knowledge
  • 16. Bloom's Revised Taxonomy Model Note: These are learning objectives – not learning activities. It may be useful to think of preceding each objective with something like, “students will be able to…:
  • 17.
  • 18.
  • 19.
  • 20.
  • 21.
  • 22.
  • 23.
  • 24.
  • 25.
  • 26.
  • 27.
  • 28.
  • 29.
  • 30.
  • 31.
  • 33. Remembering • Make a list of the main events of the story. •Make a time line of events. •Make a facts chart. •Write a list of any pieces of information you can remember. •What animals were in the story? •Make a chart showing… •Make an acrostic. •Recite a poem.
  • 34. Understanding •Cut out, or draw pictures to show a particular event. •Illustrate what you think the main idea may have been. •Make a cartoon strip showing the sequence of events. •Write and perform a play based on the story. •Retell the story in your own words. •Write a summary report of the event •Prepare a flow chart to illustrate the sequence of events. •Make a coloring book. •Cut out, or draw pictures to show a particular event. Illustrate what you think the main idea was .•Make a cartoon strip showing the sequence of events. •Write and perform a play based on the story. •Retell the story in your own words. •Write a summary report of the event •Prepare a flow chart to illustrate the sequence of events. •Cut out, or draw pictures to show a particular event. Illustrate what you think the main idea was. •Make a cartoon strip showing the sequence of events. •Write and perform a play based on the story.
  • 35. Applying •Construct a model to demonstrate how it works •Make a diorama to illustrate an event •Make a scrapbook about the areas of study. •Make a papier-mache map / clay model to include relevant information about an event. •Take a collection of photographs to demonstrate a particular point. •Make up a puzzle or a game about the topic. •Write a textbook about this topic for others. •Dress a doll in national costume. •Make a clay model. •Paint a mural using the same materials. •Design a marketing strategy for your product using a known strategy as a model.
  • 36. Analyzing •Design a questionnaire to gather information. •Write a commercial to sell a new product •Make a flow chart to show the critical stages. •Construct a graph to illustrate selected information. •Make a family tree showing relationships. •Devise a play about the study area. •Write a biography of a person studied. •Prepare a report about the area of study. •Conduct an investigation to produce information to support a view. •Review a work of art in terms of form, color and texture.
  • 37. Evaluating •Prepare a list of criteria to judge… •Conduct a debate about an issue of special interest. •Make a booklet about five rules you see as important. Convince others. •Form a panel to discuss views. •Write a letter to. ..advising on changes needed. •Write a half-yearly report. •Prepare a case to present your view about...
  • 38. Creating •Invent a machine to do a specific task. •Design a building to house your study. •Create a new product. Give it a name and plan a marketing campaign. •Write about your feelings in relation to... •Write a TV show play, puppet show, role play, song or pantomime about.. •Design a record, book or magazine cover for... •Sell an idea •Devise a way to... •Make up a new language and use it in an example.
  • 39. Assessment Questions (Pohl, Learning to Think, Thinking to Learn, p. 12)
  • 40. Remembering •What happened after...? •How many...? •What is...? •Who was it that...? •Can you name ...? •Find the meaning of… •Describe what happened after… •Who spoke to...? •Which is true or false...?
  • 41. Understanding •Can you write in your own words? •How would you explain…? •Can you write a brief outline...? •What do you think could have happened next...? •Who do you think...? •What was the main idea...? •Can you clarify…? •Can you illustrate…? •Does everyone act in the way that …….. does?
  • 42. Applying •Do you know of another instance where…? •Can you group by characteristics such as…? •Which factors would you change if…? •What questions would you ask of…? •From the information given, can you develop a set of instructions about…?
  • 43. Analysing •Which events could not have happened? •If. ..happened, what might the ending have been? •How is...similar to...? •What do you see as other possible outcomes? •Why did...changes occur? •Can you explain what must have happened when...? •What are some or the problems of...? •Can you distinguish between...? •What were some of the motives behind..? •What was the turning point? •What was the problem with...?
  • 44. Evaluating •Is there a better solution to...? •Judge the value of... What do you think about...? •Can you defend your position about...? •Do you think...is a good or bad thing? •How would you have handled...? •What changes to.. would you recommend? •Do you believe...? How would you feel if. ..? •How effective are. ..? •What are the consequences..? •What influence will....have on our lives? •What are the pros and cons of....? •Why is ....of value? •What are the alternatives? •Who will gain & who will loose?
  • 45. Creating •Can you design a...to...? •Can you see a possible solution to...? •If you had access to all resources, how would you deal with...? •Why don't you devise your own way to...? •What would happen if ...? •How many ways can you...? •Can you create new and unusual uses for...? •Can you develop a proposal which would...?
  • 46.
  • 47.