EDU8881:Leadership inEducationAssignment 1:Educational Leadership Group Work
O Andree GoodyerO Sandra HaywardO Stephanie ShawO Arapine WalkerO Ruth LydenO John Rutherford
Leadership in Education is:Educational Leaders are committed and dedicated topositively influencing the learning and achie...
VISION & GOAL SETTINGOne of the key activities of educational leadership is to facilitate thedevelopment and implementatio...
INSTRUCTIONAL PRACTICE &PROFESSIONAL DEVELOPMENTThe effective implementation of the curriculum by teachersthrough teaching...
INSTRUCTIONAL PRACTICE &PROFESSIONAL DEVELOPMENTEducational leader’s role includes overseeing:Curriculum, Instruction and ...
INSTRUCTIONAL PRACTICE &PROFESSIONAL DEVELOPMENTFacilitating opportunities for teachers to engage in formal and informalpr...
LEARNING ENVIRONMENT:CULTURE & TONEOne of the key functions of leading teaching and learning is developingan instructional...
RELATIONSHIPS & PARTNERSHIPSRobinson, V., Hohepa, M & Lloyd, C. (2009) state: School leadersneed to build educationally po...
STRATEGIC RESOURCINGToday’s Educational Leaders have a wide and varied role. The elements ofStrategic Resourcing have beco...
REFERENCESBishop, R. (2011). How effective School Leaders reduce educational disparities. In J.Robertson & H.Timperley (Ed...
Education Leadership Model 2013 (Middle Yrs Grp)
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Education Leadership Model 2013 (Middle Yrs Grp)

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Education Leadership Model 2013 (Middle Yrs Grp)

  1. 1. EDU8881:Leadership inEducationAssignment 1:Educational Leadership Group Work
  2. 2. O Andree GoodyerO Sandra HaywardO Stephanie ShawO Arapine WalkerO Ruth LydenO John Rutherford
  3. 3. Leadership in Education is:Educational Leaders are committed and dedicated topositively influencing the learning and achievement forall students (Cardno, 2012)
  4. 4. VISION & GOAL SETTINGOne of the key activities of educational leadership is to facilitate thedevelopment and implementation of a shared vision from which comes clearexpectations and goals to improve student achievement (Bush, 2011).“This dimension is about the exercise of leadership through the setting andcommunicating of goals for teacher and student learning (Robinson, Hohepa &Lloyd, 2009, p. 40).”“Leadership needs to be proactively directed towards a common goal ofestablishing the school as a high-performing institution where high levels ofstudent achievement and learning are normalized (Bishop, 2011, p. 29).”“Defining the school’s mission is, then a dynamic process requiring cooperationto construct a workable vision and reflexive thinking to keep the mission clearand honest (Weber, 1996 p. 260).”
  5. 5. INSTRUCTIONAL PRACTICE &PROFESSIONAL DEVELOPMENTThe effective implementation of the curriculum by teachersthrough teaching and learning programmes is the clearestway of realising the school’s mission (Weber, 1996). Theeffective school leader must be involved with teachers inensuring quality learning for all students. Educationalleaders are accountable for planning, coordinating andevaluating teaching and teaching programmes.
  6. 6. INSTRUCTIONAL PRACTICE &PROFESSIONAL DEVELOPMENTEducational leader’s role includes overseeing:Curriculum, Instruction and AssessmentEnsuring curriculum programming is linked and aligned with classroom instructional programmes.(Weber, 1996) and “Student progress is monitored and assessment results used to improveteaching.” (Robinson et. al., 2009, p. 42).Teacher Performance and Evaluation“Effective principals work relentlessly to improve achievement by focussing on the quality ofinstruction.” (The WallaceFoundation, 2012, p. 10). They have high expectations and encourageand support teachers to “practice their profession in an exemplary way (pushing for continuousimprovement)” (Sergiovanni, as cited in Weber, 1996, p. 254).Educational leaders through direct or indirect (Cardno, 2012, p. 25) means, have “involvement inthe support and evaluation of teaching through regular classroom visits and provision of formativeand summative feedback to teachers...oversight of curriculum through school-wide coordinationacross classes and year levels and alignment to school goals.” (Robinson et. al., 2008, p. 656).The Wallace Foundation (2012), support this view stating, “...principals intent on promotinggrowth in both students and adults spend time in classrooms (or that someone who’s qualifieddoes), observing and commenting on what’s working well and what is not.”,(Wallace Foundation,2012, p. 11) they go on to identify they intensify their contact with teachers through, “on-goingand informal interactions with teachers”(ibid).Weber (1996) suggests that the instructional leader needs to be able to indicate priorities, providesupport and advise for the improvement of class teaching and teaching programmes.
  7. 7. INSTRUCTIONAL PRACTICE &PROFESSIONAL DEVELOPMENTFacilitating opportunities for teachers to engage in formal and informalprofessional learning. “This set of leadership practices has a veryeducationally significant effect on student outcomes (Robinson,Hohepa & Lloyd, 2009, p. 42). Making participation and evenleadership, accessible acknowledges that teacher’s contributions arepowerful in improving the instructional program (Weber, 1996, p. 263).“Recent research suggests that providing teachers with time forprofessional development can address the three problems cited so far:burnout, a lack of fulfilling work, and the need for professionalcollaboration (Weber, 1996, p. 270).”“Associated with effective professional communities is a strong senseof collective responsibility and accountability for student achievementand well-being (Robinson, Hohepa & Lloyd, 2009, p. 42).”
  8. 8. LEARNING ENVIRONMENT:CULTURE & TONEOne of the key functions of leading teaching and learning is developingan instructional climate that promotes engagement in learning andachievement (The Wallace Foundation, 2012). “Effective principalsensure that their schools allow both adults and children to put learningat the center of their daily activities (The Wallace Foundation, 2012,p.6).”Creating a learning centered community involves the creation of a safe,orderly and systematic environment and ensuring that attitude ofteachers is positive, open, supportive receptive to learning. “Theattitudes that students form about academic learning come, at least inpart, from the adults in the school (Weber, 1996, p. 263). ”
  9. 9. RELATIONSHIPS & PARTNERSHIPSRobinson, V., Hohepa, M & Lloyd, C. (2009) state: School leadersneed to build educationally powerful connections with families,whanau, and communities through teaching … and school homerelationships. The role of leadership in making such connections ismost important and such connections can have large positiveeffects on the academic and social outcomes of students.Russell Bishop (2011) suggests that effective leadership aims toengage parents, whanau and community in a way that addressestheir aspirations for the education of their children.Ministry of Education (2008) states that principals enhance studentlearning through strengthening partnerships and networks …building strong relationships with key stakeholders: trustees,parents, whanau and local organisations.
  10. 10. STRATEGIC RESOURCINGToday’s Educational Leaders have a wide and varied role. The elements ofStrategic Resourcing have become a large part of the day to day running ofany Educational Institution. Strategic resourcing infers that resources(material, intellectual and human) are secured and allocated to meet theneeds of the school and the wider community. The organisational andmanagerial responsibilities undertaken by Principals and senior leadersinfluence students, their learning and their Whanau.“To get the job done effective leaders need to make good use of theresources at hand. They have to be good managers.”(The Wallace Foundation, 2012, p.12)“When identifying and obtaining resources, leaders in high-performingschools:-use clear criteria that are aligned to pedagogical and philosophicalpurposes;-ensure sustained funding for pedagogical priorities.”(Robinson, Hohepa, & Lloyd, 2009, p.41)
  11. 11. REFERENCESBishop, R. (2011). How effective School Leaders reduce educational disparities. In J.Robertson & H.Timperley (Eds.), Leadership and learning (pp. 27 – 40). London: Sage.Cardno, C. (2012). Managing Effective Relationships in Education. London: Sage. Ministry of Education.(2008).Kiwi Leadership for Principals: Principals as Educational Leaders. Wellington: New Zealand Ministry ofEducation.Robinson, V., Hohepa, M. & Lloyd, C. (2009). School leadership and student outcomes: identifying whatworks and why. Best Evidence Synthesis Iteration [BES]. Wellington: New Zealand Ministry of Education.The Wallace Foundation (2012). The school principal as leader: Guiding schools to better teaching andlearning perspectives: The Wallace Foundation.Weber, J. (1996). Leading the instructional programme. In S. C. S. P. K. Piele(Ed.), School Leadership:Handbook for excellence (pp. 253-278). University of Origan: Clearinghouse on Educational Management.
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