Trail  ofTears
removal•Much of Jackson’s popularity was based on his battles against the Amerindians of Florida in the years before Flori...
removal• When Southern farmers  decided that they needed  more land for their  plantations and wanted to  expand on to Ame...
removal• He convinced Congress to pass  the Indian Removal Act of  1830, which gave the President  the authority to trade ...
removal• Many Amerindian groups  went along with this, but  the so-called “Five Civilized  Tribes” (Cherokee, Creek,  Choc...
removal• These tribes were forced to  leave their ancestral land,  leaving their acres and acres  of cultivated land for t...
removal•The Cherokee, who had assimilated the most into white American culture, tried to fight the removal act through the...
removal• In the Supreme Court case  of Worcester v. Georgia, the  Cherokee sued to be able to  stay on their land in Georg...
removal• Jackson, again not a big  supporter of the  Amerindians, was supposed  to have remarked that “John  Marshall has ...
removal• The Cherokees were forced to  take a 116-day, 1,000 mile walk  from Georgia to the Oklahoma  Territory that becam...
removal
removal• Other Amerindian groups  continued their attempts to  stop expansion into their  territory, but they were  unable...
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Trail of Tears

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This is a look at the forced march of the Cherokee from their homes in Georgia to "Indian Territory" in what is now Oklahoma.

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Trail of Tears

  1. 1. Trail ofTears
  2. 2. removal•Much of Jackson’s popularity was based on his battles against the Amerindians of Florida in the years before Florida became U.S. property.
  3. 3. removal• When Southern farmers decided that they needed more land for their plantations and wanted to expand on to Amerindian territory, Jackson was only too happy to help.
  4. 4. removal• He convinced Congress to pass the Indian Removal Act of 1830, which gave the President the authority to trade Amerindians land in the area of the Louisiana Purchase for their land east of the Mississippi River.
  5. 5. removal• Many Amerindian groups went along with this, but the so-called “Five Civilized Tribes” (Cherokee, Creek, Choctaw, Chickasaw, and Seminole) did not.
  6. 6. removal• These tribes were forced to leave their ancestral land, leaving their acres and acres of cultivated land for the hard prairie of the Indian Territory in present-day Oklahoma.
  7. 7. removal•The Cherokee, who had assimilated the most into white American culture, tried to fight the removal act through the court system.
  8. 8. removal• In the Supreme Court case of Worcester v. Georgia, the Cherokee sued to be able to stay on their land in Georgia and John Marshall agreed with them.
  9. 9. removal• Jackson, again not a big supporter of the Amerindians, was supposed to have remarked that “John Marshall has made his decision. Now let him enforce it.”
  10. 10. removal• The Cherokees were forced to take a 116-day, 1,000 mile walk from Georgia to the Oklahoma Territory that became known as the Trail of Tears, as 1 out of 4 Cherokees died during the journey.
  11. 11. removal
  12. 12. removal• Other Amerindian groups continued their attempts to stop expansion into their territory, but they were unable to prevent it from happening.

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