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Metaliteracy and the Participatory Role of Learners
in Today’s Social Information Environment
1
Trudi Jacobson and Tom Mac...
Today’s Workshop
12:45 Presentation
2:00 Breakout session 1: Individual Reflection
2:20 Break (flexible timing due to ecli...
What we’ll talk about
• Metaliteracy
• ACRL Information Literacy Framework
• Metaliteracy-related projects
– Digital badgi...
GenEd at
Focused on making connections
• “both locally as well as globally”
• “from academic knowledge to experience”
• “a...
NMC Horizon Report 2017
Higher Education Edition
Solvable Challenge:
Improving Digital Literacy
“The proliferation of fake...
NMC Horizon Report 2017
Higher Education Edition
Solvable Challenge:
Integrating Formal and
Informal Learning
“With over 4...
7
“Our “digital natives” may be able to flit
between Facebook and Twitter while
simultaneously uploading a selfie to
Insta...
8
Wineburg, Sam and McGrew, Sarah and Breakstone, Joel and Ortega, Teresa. (2016).
Evaluating Information: The Cornerstone...
DIGITAL LITERACY IS NOT ENOUGH
9
WHAT IS METALITERACY?
10
“Metaliteracy is an overarching, self-referential, and
comprehensive framework that informs other literacy
types. Informat...
Metaliteracy: Reinventing Information
Literacy to Empower Learners
(Mackey and Jacobson, 2014).
“While literacy is focused...
Metaliteracy: Reinventing Information
Literacy to Empower Learners
(Mackey and Jacobson, 2014).
“The use of the term
metal...
14
“Metaliteracy prepares us
to ask critical questions
about our searches and the
technologies we use to
seek answers and ...
15
Jacobson and Mackey, August 7, 2015, “Can’t seem to stop those ads
following you around? Why not become ‘metaliterate’?...
“How a Blogger Exploded the Hot New Theory About
Amelia Earhart With 30 Minutes of Online Searching”
16
Ruth Graham, Slate...
17
Metaliteracy
Meta-
Cognitive
Learner
Teacher
Four Domains of Metaliteracy
Metacognitive:
what learners think
about their own
thinking—a reflective
understanding of
how...
Learner Roles
Mackey and Jacobson (2014) Metaliteracy: Reinventing Information Literacy to Empower Learners
I’d love to
see my
students
take on the
role of…
Quick Reflection
METALITERACY GOALS
AND LEARNING OBJECTIVES
21
22
“A majority of U.S. adults – 62 percent
– get news on social media.”
News Use Across Social Media Platforms 2016
(Gottf...
23
“Computer Scientists Demonstrate The Potential
For Faking Video”
Aarti Shahani, Tech Reporter, NPR Business Desk
July 1...
24
“How to Spot Fake News”
(Kiely and Robertson, November 18, 2016)
Assess content from different sources, including
dynam...
25
http://www.visitlondon.com/things-to-do/place/2229527-speakers-corner#bO4g46GDaAPPvoWJ.97
Understand the differing natu...
26
Understand the differing natures of feedback
mechanisms and context in traditional and
social media platforms
Place an information source in its context
(for example, author’s purpose, format of
information, and delivery mode)
27htt...
Understand Personal Privacy, Information
Ethics and Intellectual Property Issues
28
Pew Research Center: The Future of Pri...
Value user-generated content and critically
evaluate contributions made by others: see self as
a producer as well as consu...
Apply copyright and Creative Commons
licensing as appropriate to the creation of
original or repurposed information
30
htt...
Determine the value of formal and informal
information from various networked sources
(scholarly, user-generated, OERs, et...
Share Information and Collaborate
in Participatory Environments
32
“Metaliterate individuals recognize there are ethical
c...
https://metaliteracystudent.tumblr.com
Demonstrate ability to connect learning and
research strategies with lifelong learn...
THE ACRL FRAMEWORK AND
METALITERACY
Find the similarities…
34
Metaliteracy in Practice
(Jacobson and Mackey, 2016).
“The similarities to metaliteracy are
striking: metacognition, infor...
From Standards to Framework
Determine extent of
information need
Access/Search
Evaluate
Use/apply
Consider
ethical/legal/s...
http://pixabay.com/en/puzzle-learn-arrangement-components-210785/
38
Habits of Mind
Behaviors
Demonstrating
Understanding
Underpinning Ideas
(including metaliteracy)
Frame
Threshold Concepts
Hofer, Townsend, and Brunetti describe threshold
concepts and their criteria, as based on the work of J...
40
“Threshold concepts reflect the
perspective of experts in our profession
on the most important concepts in our
field, a...
Threshold Concepts
• A passage through a portal or gateway: gaining
a new view of a subject landscape
• Involve a “rite of...
42
Threshold
Concepts Transformative
Integrative
Irreversible
Bounded
Troublesome
(Hofer, Townsend, and Brunetti, 2012, 38...
IDENTIFY A THRESHOLD CONCEPT
IN YOUR DISCIPLINE
Quick reflection
43
Threshold Concepts in Disciplines
• Biology: evolution, photosynthesis
• Writing/rhetoric studies: audience, purpose, situ...
Threshold Concepts for IL
• Authority is Constructed and Contextual
• Information Creation as a Process
• Information Has ...
The Challenge
Information literacy needs to be
integrated into the context of specific
disciplines
46
Curriculum Design Considerations
• Faculty and librarians co-develop assignments
• Align threshold concepts with learning
...
Initial Ideas About Assessment
Need to avoid assessments that allow mimicry
Rather, declarative approach
where students re...
METALITERACY LEARNING
PROJECTS
49
METALITERACY DIGITAL BADGING
SYSTEM
http://suny.dsbeta.com/ (beta) and Metaliteracybadges.org (permanent)
50
❖ A record of achievement
❖ Acknowledgement of an
accomplishment
❖ Indication of a proven skill
❖ Evidence of learning
❖ V...
Credly Page
The Metaliteracy Badges
metaliteracy.org/learning-objectives
Implementations
• UUNI 110: Writing and Critical Inquiry
• UUNI 110: Writing and Critical Inquiry
• ECPY204U: Principles o...
GENERAL EDUCATION
INFORMATION LITERACY COURSES
Integrating Metaliteracy
57
Demonstrate self-empowerment through
interaction and the presentation of ideas
(learners are both students and teachers)
S...
Value user-generated content and critically
evaluate contributions made by others: see self as
a producer as well as consu...
METALITERACY MOOCS
60
• “When designed with students as the central drivers of
their learning, MOOCs can foster important lifelong
learning comp...
http://metaliteracy.cdlprojects.com
MOOC
Demonstrate ability to connect learning and
research strategies with lifelong learning processes
and personal, academic, a...
Metaliteracy YouTube Channel
Metaliteracy Learning Collaborative
65
Metaliterate
Learner
Characteristics
Adaptable
Participatory
Questions?
66
2:35-3:00pm
Breakout groups:
share and refine individual plans
67
Breakout Session One
• Use this time to reflect on what you have
learned about metaliteracy. What elements
are you already...
Breakout Session Two
• Working with other faculty and the librarian at
your table, share what you developed in
breakout se...
3:00pm-3:30pm
Reconvene for reports and last thoughts
70
Tom Mackey, Ph.D.
Vice Provost for Academic Programs
and Professor
Office of Academic Affairs
SUNY Empire State College
To...
Metaliteracy and the Participatory Role of Learners in Today’s Social Information Environment
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Metaliteracy and the Participatory Role of Learners in Today’s Social Information Environment

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Participating effectively in today’s social information environment requires abilities and dispositions that encompass and extend beyond those required to engage in academic research. The open, participatory nature of social media requires learners to take on diverse roles, from critical consumer to informed producer and responsible sharer of information in dynamic and sometimes uncertain spaces. This collaborative and connected world also provides opportunities for learners to expand their roles as communicator, researcher, and teacher. In order to connect fully and successfully in this sphere, our students must understand and accept their potential contributions and responsibilities when consuming and creating information in an environment that is similarly fractured and divisive. They need to adapt to ever-changing technologies and must be prepared to ask critical questions about the information they encounter from formal and informal sources. General Education, in particular, is key to how we prepare students for this ever-shifting and dynamic socially connected world.

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Metaliteracy and the Participatory Role of Learners in Today’s Social Information Environment

  1. 1. Metaliteracy and the Participatory Role of Learners in Today’s Social Information Environment 1 Trudi Jacobson and Tom Mackey #metaliteracy Temple University Fall 2017 GenEd Faculty Assembly Monday, August 21, 2017 noon-4:00 (SERC 108A/B)
  2. 2. Today’s Workshop 12:45 Presentation 2:00 Breakout session 1: Individual Reflection 2:20 Break (flexible timing due to eclipse!) 2:35 Breakout session 2: Group 3:00 Reconvene: Reports and Wrap Up 2 Image by Luc Viatour
  3. 3. What we’ll talk about • Metaliteracy • ACRL Information Literacy Framework • Metaliteracy-related projects – Digital badging system • Case Study: General Education Course – MOOCs • Q & A 3
  4. 4. GenEd at Focused on making connections • “both locally as well as globally” • “from academic knowledge to experience” • “across areas of study from a global perspective” • “to current controversies from a local perspective” • “between what they learn, their lives and their communities” 4https://gened.temple.edu/blog/welcome-to-the-general-education-program-site/
  5. 5. NMC Horizon Report 2017 Higher Education Edition Solvable Challenge: Improving Digital Literacy “The proliferation of fake news stories during the recent US presidential election illustrates the importance of cultivating skills for mindful media consumption” (p. 24). https://www.nmc.org
  6. 6. NMC Horizon Report 2017 Higher Education Edition Solvable Challenge: Integrating Formal and Informal Learning “With over 40% of the world’s population accessing the internet, recognizing the power and prevalence of online informal learning opportunities is vital to keeping formal education relevant” (p. 26). https://www.nmc.org
  7. 7. 7 “Our “digital natives” may be able to flit between Facebook and Twitter while simultaneously uploading a selfie to Instagram and texting a friend. But when it comes to evaluating information that flows through social media channels, they are easily duped” (p. 4). Wineburg, Sam and McGrew, Sarah and Breakstone, Joel and Ortega, Teresa. (2016). Evaluating Information: The Cornerstone of Civic Online Reasoning. Stanford Digital Repository. Available at: http://purl.stanford.edu/fv751yt5934
  8. 8. 8 Wineburg, Sam and McGrew, Sarah and Breakstone, Joel and Ortega, Teresa. (2016). Evaluating Information: The Cornerstone of Civic Online Reasoning. Stanford Digital Repository. Available at: http://purl.stanford.edu/fv751yt5934 “At present, we worry that democracy is threatened by the ease at which disinformation about civic issues is allowed to spread and flourish” (p. 5).
  9. 9. DIGITAL LITERACY IS NOT ENOUGH 9
  10. 10. WHAT IS METALITERACY? 10
  11. 11. “Metaliteracy is an overarching, self-referential, and comprehensive framework that informs other literacy types. Information literacy is the metaliteracy for a digital age because it provides the higher order thinking required to engage with multiple document types through various media formats in collaborative environments” (p. 70). 11 Mackey, T. P., & Jacobson, T. E. (2011). Reframing Information Literacy as a Metaliteracy. College & Research Libraries, 72(1), 62-78. http://crl.acrl.org/content/72/1/62.full.pdf Reframing Information Literacy as a Metaliteracy
  12. 12. Metaliteracy: Reinventing Information Literacy to Empower Learners (Mackey and Jacobson, 2014). “While literacy is focused on reading and writing, and information literacy has strongly emphasized search and retrieval, metaliteracy is about what happens beyond these abilities to promote the collaborative production and sharing of information” (p. 6).
  13. 13. Metaliteracy: Reinventing Information Literacy to Empower Learners (Mackey and Jacobson, 2014). “The use of the term metaliteracy suggests a way of thinking about one’s own literacy. To be metaliterate requires individuals to understand their existing literacy strengths and areas for improvement and make decisions about their learning” (p. 2).
  14. 14. 14 “Metaliteracy prepares us to ask critical questions about our searches and the technologies we use to seek answers and to communicate with others.” Jacobson and Mackey, August 7, 2015, “Can’t seem to stop those ads following you around? Why not become ‘metaliterate’?”
  15. 15. 15 Jacobson and Mackey, August 7, 2015, “Can’t seem to stop those ads following you around? Why not become ‘metaliterate’?” “We do not just accept the authority of information because it comes from an established news organization, a celebrity, a friend, or a friend of a friend. Metaliteracy encourages reflection on the circumstances of the information produced.”
  16. 16. “How a Blogger Exploded the Hot New Theory About Amelia Earhart With 30 Minutes of Online Searching” 16 Ruth Graham, Slate, July 13, 2017
  17. 17. 17 Metaliteracy Meta- Cognitive Learner Teacher
  18. 18. Four Domains of Metaliteracy Metacognitive: what learners think about their own thinking—a reflective understanding of how and why they learn, what they do and do not know, their preconceptions, and how to continue to learn). Cognitive: what students should know upon successful completion of learning activities— comprehension, organization, application, evaluation) Affective: changes in learners’ emotions or attitudes through engagement with learning activities) Behavioral: what students should be able to do upon successful completion of learning activities— skills, competencies Mackey and Jacobson (2014) Metaliteracy: Reinventing Information Literacy to Empower Learners
  19. 19. Learner Roles Mackey and Jacobson (2014) Metaliteracy: Reinventing Information Literacy to Empower Learners
  20. 20. I’d love to see my students take on the role of… Quick Reflection
  21. 21. METALITERACY GOALS AND LEARNING OBJECTIVES 21
  22. 22. 22 “A majority of U.S. adults – 62 percent – get news on social media.” News Use Across Social Media Platforms 2016 (Gottfried & Shearer, May 26, 2016) Evaluate content critically, including dynamic, online content that changes and evolves, such as articles preprints, blogs, and wikis
  23. 23. 23 “Computer Scientists Demonstrate The Potential For Faking Video” Aarti Shahani, Tech Reporter, NPR Business Desk July 14, 2017, 4:57 AM ET “Synthesizing Obama: Learning Lip Sync from Audio” SIGGRAPH 2017 Supasorn Suwajanakorn, Steven M. Seitz, Ira Kemelmacher-Shlizerman
  24. 24. 24 “How to Spot Fake News” (Kiely and Robertson, November 18, 2016) Assess content from different sources, including dynamic content from social media, critically
  25. 25. 25 http://www.visitlondon.com/things-to-do/place/2229527-speakers-corner#bO4g46GDaAPPvoWJ.97 Understand the differing natures of feedback mechanisms and context in traditional and social media platforms
  26. 26. 26 Understand the differing natures of feedback mechanisms and context in traditional and social media platforms
  27. 27. Place an information source in its context (for example, author’s purpose, format of information, and delivery mode) 27https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Wikipedia_Seigenthaler_biography_incident
  28. 28. Understand Personal Privacy, Information Ethics and Intellectual Property Issues 28 Pew Research Center: The Future of Privacy (2014) Lee Rainie & Janna Anderson
  29. 29. Value user-generated content and critically evaluate contributions made by others: see self as a producer as well as consumer, of information 29http://digitalstorytelling.coe.uh.edu/page.cfm?id=27&cid=27
  30. 30. Apply copyright and Creative Commons licensing as appropriate to the creation of original or repurposed information 30 https://creativecommons.org/about/videos/wanna-work-together/
  31. 31. Determine the value of formal and informal information from various networked sources (scholarly, user-generated, OERs, etc.) 31 https://textbooks.opensuny.org/the-information-literacy-users-guide-an-open-online-textbook/
  32. 32. Share Information and Collaborate in Participatory Environments 32 “Metaliterate individuals recognize there are ethical considerations involved when sharing information, such as the information must be accurate. But there is more. Metaliteracy asks that individuals understand on a mental and emotional level the potential impact of one’s participation.” “How can we learn to reject fake news in the digital world?” (Mackey & Jacobson, The Conversation, December 5, 2016)
  33. 33. https://metaliteracystudent.tumblr.com Demonstrate ability to connect learning and research strategies with lifelong learning processes and personal, academic, and professional goals
  34. 34. THE ACRL FRAMEWORK AND METALITERACY Find the similarities… 34
  35. 35. Metaliteracy in Practice (Jacobson and Mackey, 2016). “The similarities to metaliteracy are striking: metacognition, information creation, and participation in learning communities all reflect elements espoused by metaliteracy when it was originally developed to significantly broaden the conception of information literacy that was commonly accepted, at least in the United States, due to the definition in the ACRL Information Literacy Standards.” (Preface)
  36. 36. From Standards to Framework Determine extent of information need Access/Search Evaluate Use/apply Consider ethical/legal/social issues Scholarship Authority Information Creation Value Searching Inquiry
  37. 37. http://pixabay.com/en/puzzle-learn-arrangement-components-210785/
  38. 38. 38 Habits of Mind Behaviors Demonstrating Understanding Underpinning Ideas (including metaliteracy) Frame
  39. 39. Threshold Concepts Hofer, Townsend, and Brunetti describe threshold concepts and their criteria, as based on the work of Jan Meyer and Ray Land: …Threshold concepts are the core ideas and processes in any discipline that define the discipline, but that are so ingrained that they often go unspoken or unrecognized by practitioner. They are the central concepts that we want our students to understand and put into practice, that encourage them to think and act like practitioners themselves. (Hofer, Townsend, and Brunetti, 2012, 387- 88) 39
  40. 40. 40 “Threshold concepts reflect the perspective of experts in our profession on the most important concepts in our field, and also provide a developmental trajectory for assisting our students in moving from novice to experts in using and understanding information in a wide variety of contexts.” Why Threshold Concepts?
  41. 41. Threshold Concepts • A passage through a portal or gateway: gaining a new view of a subject landscape • Involve a “rite of passage” to a new level of understanding: a crucial transition • Require movement through a “liminal” space which is challenging, unsettling, disturbing— where the student may become “stuck”
  42. 42. 42 Threshold Concepts Transformative Integrative Irreversible Bounded Troublesome (Hofer, Townsend, and Brunetti, 2012, 387-88), quoting Meyer and Land
  43. 43. IDENTIFY A THRESHOLD CONCEPT IN YOUR DISCIPLINE Quick reflection 43
  44. 44. Threshold Concepts in Disciplines • Biology: evolution, photosynthesis • Writing/rhetoric studies: audience, purpose, situated practice, genre • Geology: the scale of geologic time • Economics: opportunity cost • Accounting: depreciation • History: no unitary account of the past
  45. 45. Threshold Concepts for IL • Authority is Constructed and Contextual • Information Creation as a Process • Information Has Value • Research as Inquiry • Scholarship as Conversation • Searching as Strategic Exploration
  46. 46. The Challenge Information literacy needs to be integrated into the context of specific disciplines 46
  47. 47. Curriculum Design Considerations • Faculty and librarians co-develop assignments • Align threshold concepts with learning outcomes (or create new learning outcomes) • Allow for confusion and uncertainty • Revisit the concept more than once • Position frames strategically across the curriculum
  48. 48. Initial Ideas About Assessment Need to avoid assessments that allow mimicry Rather, declarative approach where students represent their knowledge, such as concept maps, portfolios, logs, blogs, diaries (Meyer and Land, 2010)
  49. 49. METALITERACY LEARNING PROJECTS 49
  50. 50. METALITERACY DIGITAL BADGING SYSTEM http://suny.dsbeta.com/ (beta) and Metaliteracybadges.org (permanent) 50
  51. 51. ❖ A record of achievement ❖ Acknowledgement of an accomplishment ❖ Indication of a proven skill ❖ Evidence of learning ❖ Verification of competency ❖ Validation of non-traditional skills or experiences What is a Digital Badge? The Badge CC BY-SA Kyle Bowen
  52. 52. Credly Page
  53. 53. The Metaliteracy Badges metaliteracy.org/learning-objectives
  54. 54. Implementations • UUNI 110: Writing and Critical Inquiry • UUNI 110: Writing and Critical Inquiry • ECPY204U: Principles of Career and Life Planning • AENG 240V: Writing America • UNL 207: Information Literacy • ESPY 120: Psychology of Academic and Personal Effectiveness • Honors Program • ERDG 500: Classroom Literacy Instruction • IINF 200: Research Methods • RPOS 250: Current Policy Debates Viewed Through a Social Science Lens • GOG 160: China: People and Place • CEHC 210: Critical Inquiry and Communication • nciples of Career and Life Planning • AENG 240V: Writing America • UNL 207: Information Literacy
  55. 55. GENERAL EDUCATION INFORMATION LITERACY COURSES Integrating Metaliteracy 57
  56. 56. Demonstrate self-empowerment through interaction and the presentation of ideas (learners are both students and teachers) Students earned the Empowered Learner badge Team-based activities: • Developing potential badge content • Session with instructor of lower level writing course • Preparation for teaching • Teaching lower level students 58
  57. 57. Value user-generated content and critically evaluate contributions made by others: see self as a producer as well as consumer, of information 59 Michelle Ebanks Barbara Masekela
  58. 58. METALITERACY MOOCS 60
  59. 59. • “When designed with students as the central drivers of their learning, MOOCs can foster important lifelong learning competencies related to self-regulation and learner agency.” • “This decentralized learning model, however, calls for a supportive pedagogy that addresses the learning processes needed for students to take on active roles as participants, contributors and teachers.” 61 O’Brien, K., Forte, M., Mackey, T. P., Jacobson, T.E., “Metaliteracy as Pedagogical Framework for Learner-Centered Design in Three MOOC Platforms: Connectivist, Coursera and Canvas.” (under review). Open Praxis. 2017. Pedagogy
  60. 60. http://metaliteracy.cdlprojects.com MOOC
  61. 61. Demonstrate ability to connect learning and research strategies with lifelong learning processes and personal, academic, and professional goals https://www.coursera.org/learn/metaliteracy
  62. 62. Metaliteracy YouTube Channel Metaliteracy Learning Collaborative
  63. 63. 65 Metaliterate Learner Characteristics Adaptable Participatory
  64. 64. Questions? 66
  65. 65. 2:35-3:00pm Breakout groups: share and refine individual plans 67
  66. 66. Breakout Session One • Use this time to reflect on what you have learned about metaliteracy. What elements are you already using in your classes, and how are each currently applied? • Identify the elements of metaliteracy that are new to you and your teaching. How would these newer elements enhance your learning goals for students? How might you begin to incorporate them? 68
  67. 67. Breakout Session Two • Working with other faculty and the librarian at your table, share what you developed in breakout session one. We will ask one person per table to give a brief overview of key ideas when we reconvene. 69
  68. 68. 3:00pm-3:30pm Reconvene for reports and last thoughts 70
  69. 69. Tom Mackey, Ph.D. Vice Provost for Academic Programs and Professor Office of Academic Affairs SUNY Empire State College Tom.Mackey@esc.edu @TomMackey Trudi Jacobson, M.L.S., M.A. Distinguished Librarian Head, Information Literacy Department University Libraries University at Albany, SUNY Tjacobson@albany.edu @PBKTrudi 71

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