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Expanding Metaliteracy Across the Curriculum to Advance Lifelong Civic Engagement

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This presentation was for 2015 Summer Workshop at Cedar Crest College and explored the following: Metaliterate learners, who apply integrated competencies related to evaluating, consuming, and producing information in participatory environments, will be better prepared for college level learning and lifelong civic engagement. This workshop defined metaliteracy, discussed the four domains of metaliteracy and related learning goals and objectives, and examined how this approach has been applied in the curricular design of several innovative projects such as competency based digital badging and three MOOCs. Participants discussed ways to envisage opportunities to enhance students’ metaliteracy abilities, and to share these ideas with other attendees.

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Expanding Metaliteracy Across the Curriculum to Advance Lifelong Civic Engagement

  1. 1. Expanding Metaliteracy Across the Curriculum to Advance Lifelong Civic Engagement 1 Tom Mackey and Trudi Jacobson #metaliteracy Summer Workshop Wednesday, August 19, 2015 Cedar Crest College Allentown, Pennsylvania
  2. 2. Today’s Workshop 10:00 Overview of Metaliteracy 10:45 Break! 10:55 Activity: ML Learning Objective 11:15 Metaliteracy Learning Collaborative Projects 11:35 The ACRL Framework and Metaliteracy 12:00 Activity: Putting It Together 12:15 Q & A 2
  3. 3. WHAT IS METALITERACY? 3
  4. 4. • “promotes critical thinking and collaboration in a digital age” (p. 62). • “comprehensive framework to effectively participate in social media and online communities” (p. 62). • “unified construct that supports the acquisition, production, and sharing of knowledge in collaborative online communities” (p. 62). 4 Thomas P. Mackey and Trudi E. Jacobson “Reframing Information Literacy as a Metaliteracy” College & Research Libraries. January 2011 72:62-78. http://crl.acrl.org/content/72/1/62.full.pdf
  5. 5. 5 Understand Format Type and Delivery Mode Evaluate User Feedback as Active Researcher Create a Context for User-generated Information Thomas P. Mackey and Trudi E. Jacobson “Reframing Information Literacy as a Metaliteracy” College & Research Libraries. January 2011 72:62-78. http://crl.acrl.org/content/72/1/62.full.pdf Initial ML Learning Objectives Evaluate Dynamic Content Critically
  6. 6. 6 Produce Original Content in Multiple Media Formats Understand Personal Privacy, Information Ethics and Intellectual Property Issues Share Information in Participatory Environments Thomas P. Mackey and Trudi E. Jacobson “Reframing Information Literacy as a Metaliteracy” College & Research Libraries. January 2011 72:62-78. http://crl.acrl.org/content/72/1/62.full.pdf Initial ML Learning Objectives
  7. 7. 7 Mackey and Jacobson (2014) Metaliteracy: Reinventing Information Literacy to Empower Learners
  8. 8. Metaliteracy: Reinventing Information Literacy to Empower Learners (Mackey and Jacobson, 2014). “Metaliteracy expands the scope of traditional information skills (determine, access, locate, understand, produce, and use information) to include the collaborative production and sharing of information in participatory digital environments (collaborate, participate, produce, and share)” (p. 1).
  9. 9. “Metaliteracy is envisioned as a comprehensive model for information literacy to advance critical thinking and reflection in social media, open learning settings, and online communities.” (Jacobson and Mackey, Proposing a Metaliteracy Model to Redefine Information Literacy, 2013)
  10. 10. “Metaliteracy empowers learners to participate in interactive information environments, equipped with the ability to continuously reflect, change, and contribute as critical thinkers” (p. 86). (Jacobson and Mackey, Proposing a Metaliteracy Model to Redefine Information Literacy, 2013)
  11. 11. Metaliteracy: Reinventing Information Literacy to Empower Learners (Mackey and Jacobson, 2014). “Metaliteracy is not about introducing yet another literacy format, but rather reinventing an existing one, information literacy, the critical foundation literacy that informs many others while being flexible and adaptive enough to evolve and change over time” (p. 1-2).
  12. 12. Metaliteracy: Reinventing Information Literacy to Empower Learners (Mackey and Jacobson, 2014). “While literacy is focused on reading and writing, and information literacy has strongly emphasized search and retrieval, metaliteracy is about what happens beyond these abilities to promote the collaborative production and sharing of information” (p. 6).
  13. 13. Collaboratively Developed ML Goals and Objectives 1. Evaluate content critically, including dynamic, online content that changes and evolves, such as article preprints, blogs, and wikis 2. Understand personal privacy, information ethics, and intellectual property issues in changing technology environments 3. Share information and collaborate in a variety of participatory environments 4. Demonstrate ability to connect learning and research strategies with lifelong learning processes and personal, academic, and professional goals 13 http://metaliteracy.org/learning-objectives/
  14. 14. 14 Mackey and Jacobson (2014) Metaliteracy: Reinventing Information Literacy to Empower Learners
  15. 15. Quick Reflection: I’d love to see my students take on the role of… 15
  16. 16. Metaliteracy in Practice (Jacobson and Mackey, Forthcoming). “Metaliteracy applies to all stages and facets of an individual’s life. It is not limited to the academic realm, nor is it something learned once and for all. Indeed, metaliteracy focuses on adaptability as information environments change, and the critical reflection necessary to recognize new and evolving needs in order to remain adept.” (Preface)
  17. 17. 17 Can’t seem to stop those ads following you around? Why not become ‘metaliterate’? Jacobson and Mackey, August 7, 2015
  18. 18. 18 “Metaliteracy prepares us to ask critical questions about our searches and the technologies we use to seek answers and to communicate with others.” Jacobson and Mackey, August 7, 2015
  19. 19. 19 “We do not just accept the authority of information because it comes from an established news organization, a celebrity, a friend, or a friend of a friend. Metaliteracy encourages reflection on the circumstances of the information produced.” Jacobson and Mackey, August 7, 2015
  20. 20. 20 “The truth is that we can all be metaliterate learners – meditative and empowered, asking perceptive questions, thinking about what and how we learn, while sharing our content and insights as we make contributions to society.” Jacobson and Mackey, August 7, 2015
  21. 21. 21
  22. 22. METALITERACY LEARNING OBJECTIVE ACTIVITY Think / Pair / Share 22
  23. 23. Think / Pair / Share (later) • What metaliteracy learning objectives are missing in your courses or other teaching that you feel would be beneficial to your students? • Identify one learning objective that you’d particularly like to tackle (maybe connected to the role you chose). How might you start? Discuss with someone near you. Share your ideas on Padlet: http://padlet.com/tjacobson/CCCWorkshop 23
  24. 24. CURRICULAR DESIGN: MOOCS AND BADGING SYSTEM Metaliteracy Learning Collaborative Projects 24
  25. 25. Grant #1: Establish metaliteracy learning collaborative and explore badging; For Fun: Connectivist MOOC and badging system Grant #2: Integrate badging into Coursera MOOC Extra credit: Canvas MOOC For Fun: Reach a wider audience Projects
  26. 26. Connectivist MOOC 27
  27. 27. http://metaliteracy.cdlprojects.com MOOC
  28. 28. MOOC Talk: Bryan Alexander and Nicola Allain Metaliteracy MOOC http://metaliteracy.cdlprojects.com
  29. 29. MOOC Talk: Paul Prinsloo, UNISA, South Africa Metaliteracy MOOC http://metaliteracy.cdlprojects.com
  30. 30. METALITERACY DIGITAL BADGING SYSTEM Metaliteracybadges.org 31
  31. 31. What is a digital badge? o Record of an accomplishment o Corresponds to knowledge shown or abilities proven o A component in the competency-based education movement o Methods of gauging accomplishment varies o For metaliteracy badges, reading by humans important, given nature of the learning Image Source: Girl Guides of Canada, CC-BY
  32. 32. 34Metaliteracybadges.org
  33. 33. 35 Master Evaluator Content Analysis Search Queries Info. Sources Database Searching Evaluation Points Currency Relevance Authority Accuracy Purpose Packaging & Sharing Format Mode Perpectives & Responses Author's Voice Degrees of Separation Giving Credit Collab- orative Creation Speaking Out Informed Consumer Individual Creation Peer Review User Response Master Evaluator Badge Feedback Mechanisms
  34. 34. Preliminary Observations Students • Student engagement dependent upon faculty buy-in • Students put a great deal of themselves into their work • Interest in earning badge – “something unusual to discuss with interviewers” • Potential to earn badge appeared to increase student motivation Faculty • Level of interest varied dependent on context • Willingness to take the time to review • Frequently select quests that cover traditional content • Willingness to embed open content • Sometimes led to additional collaboration with librarians 36
  35. 35. COURSERA AND CANVAS MOOCS Integrating Digital Badging and MOOCS? 37
  36. 36. Empowering Yourself in a Connected World Animoto video created and produced by Kelsey O’Brien
  37. 37. Coursera MOOC https://www.coursera.org/course/metaliteracy
  38. 38. https://www.coursera.org/course/metaliteracy Participating as a Global Contributor
  39. 39. Metaliteracy Learning Collaborative
  40. 40. 42 Canvas MOOC: Empowering Yourself as a Digital Citizen
  41. 41. Metaliteracy YouTube Channel Metaliteracy Learning Collaborative
  42. 42. THE ACRL FRAMEWORK AND METALITERACY Find the similarities… 44
  43. 43. 45 http://www.ala.org/acrl/standards/ilframework [Thanks to Craig Gibson for several slides in this section.]
  44. 44. Goals for the Framework • A flexible system of learning information literacy concepts that can be tailored to individual settings • Recognizes the participatory, collaborative information environment: learners as content/knowledge creators, not just consumers (Mackey and Jacobson, “Reframing Information Literacy as a Metaliteracy,” C & RL, 72 (1) 2011, pp. 62-78)
  45. 45. Goals for the Framework • Importance of metacognition (thinking about one’s own thinking) (Mackey and Jacobson, “Reframing Information Literacy as a Metaliteracy,” C & RL, 72 (1) 2011, pp. 62-78) • Recognition of affective factors (dispositions/habits of mind) (Carol Kuhlthau’s work, amongst others)
  46. 46. From Standards to Framework Determine extent of information need Access/Search Evaluate Use/apply Consider ethical/legal/social issues Scholarship Authority Information Creation Value Searching Inquiry
  47. 47. The Framework vs. The Standards • 4 domains addressed: cognitive, affective, behavioral, metacognitive • Learners as information consumers and producers • 6 Frames • Learning outcomes and assessment locally-based • Faculty involvement critical • Emphasis on behavioral and cognitive domains • Learners as information consumers • 5 Standards, 22 Performance Indicators • Learning outcomes specified • Meshes with one-shots Framework Standards
  48. 48. http://pixabay.com/en/puzzle-learn-arrangement-components-210785/
  49. 49. Frame Threshold Concepts Dispositions Knowledge Practices Habits of mind Behaviors demonstrating understanding Underpinning ideas
  50. 50. Threshold Concepts Hofer, Townsend, and Brunetti describe threshold concepts and their criteria, as based on the work of Jan Meyer and Ray Land: …Threshold concepts are the core ideas and processes in any discipline that define the discipline, but that are so ingrained that they often go unspoken or unrecognized by practitioner. They are the central concepts that we want our students to understand and put into practice, that encourage them to think and act like practitioners themselves. (Hofer, Townsend, and Brunetti, 2012, 387- 88) 52
  51. 51. 53 “Threshold concepts reflect the perspective of experts in our profession on the most important concepts in our field, and also provide a developmental trajectory for assisting our students in moving from novice to experts in using and understanding information in a wide variety of contexts.” Why Threshold Concepts?
  52. 52. Threshold Concepts • A passage through a portal or gateway: gaining a new view of a subject landscape • Involve a “rite of passage” to a new level of understanding: a crucial transition • Require movement through a “liminal” space which is challenging, unsettling, disturbing— where the student may become “stuck”
  53. 53. 55 Threshold Concepts Transformative Integrative Irreversible Bounded Troublesome (Hofer, Townsend, and Brunetti, 2012, 387-88), quoting Meyer and Land
  54. 54. Threshold Concepts in Disciplines • Geology: the scale of geologic time • Economics: opportunity cost • Accounting: depreciation • History: no unitary account of the past • Writing/rhetoric studies: audience, purpose, situated practice, genre • Biology: photosynthesis
  55. 55. Threshold Concepts for IL • Authority is Constructed and Contextual • Information Creation as a Process • Information Has Value • Research as Inquiry • Scholarship as Conversation • Searching as Strategic Exploration The concepts were identified through an ongoing Delphi study being conducted by L. Townsend, A. R. Hofer, S. Lu, and K. Brunetti, though the Task Force took some of them in new directions
  56. 56. Curriculum Design Considerations • Want students to stay in liminal state long enough to learn (B. Fister) • Design with colleagues • Faculty and librarians identify existing connections • Faculty and librarians co-develop assignments • Position frames strategically across the curriculum • Align threshold concepts with learning outcomes (or create new learning outcomes)
  57. 57. Curriculum Design Considerations • Design learning activities or lessons around threshold concepts • Allow for confusion and uncertainty • Revisit the concept more than once • Revise learning outcomes if necessary Adapted from: “Threshold Concepts: Strategies and Approaches.” Office of Learning and Teaching, Southern Cross University. Available at: http://scu.edu.au/teachinglearning.index.php/92)
  58. 58. Initial Ideas About Assessment Need to avoid assessments that allow mimicry Rather, declarative approach where students represent their knowledge, such as concept maps, portfolios, logs, blogs, diaries (Meyer and Land, 2010)
  59. 59. Metaliteracy in Practice (Jacobson and Mackey, Forthcoming). “The similarities to metaliteracy are striking: metacognition, information creation, and participation in learning communities all reflect elements espoused by metaliteracy when it was originally developed to significantly broaden the conception of information literacy that was commonly accepted, at least in the United States, due to the definition in the ACRL Information Literacy Standards.” (Preface)
  60. 60. PUTTING IT TOGETHER (PAIRS): Metaliteracy and ACRL Framework 62
  61. 61. Pair work continued • Review the ML learning objective you identified earlier • Is there a frame you would like to connect it with? Any ideas on how? • Add to your Padlet post 63
  62. 62. SHARING WITH THE GROUP 64
  63. 63. Q & A 65
  64. 64. 66 Tom Mackey, Ph.D. Vice Provost for Academic Programs Office of Academic Affairs SUNY Empire State College Tom.Mackey@esc.edu @TomMackey Trudi Jacobson, M.L.S., M.A. Distinguished Librarian Head, Information Literacy Department University Libraries University at Albany, SUNY Tjacobson@albany.edu @PBKTrudi

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