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Metaliteracy: Reflective and Empowered Lifelong Learning

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This keynote presentation at La Universidad de Guadalajara "Second Encounter of Reading in Higher Education: Literacy in Everyday Life" defined metaliteracy in everyday experience and in academic settings, while exploring its importance in today’s multifaceted social media spaces. Tom Mackey and Trudi Jacobson examined how metaliteracy complements the literacy of reading and writing in new media environments, and extends information literacy beyond search and retrieval, to define a metacognitive perspective that prepares individuals to continuously reflect, adapt, persist, and participate in mutable information environments. The authors demonstrated metaliteracy learning projects, including a competency based digital badging system and Massive Open Online Courses (MOOCs) that map the metaliteracy learning goals and objectives to tangible and reflective learning activities.

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Metaliteracy: Reflective and Empowered Lifelong Learning

  1. 1. Metaliteracy: Reflective and Empowered Lifelong Learning 1 Thomas Mackey and Trudi Jacobson #metaliteracy Second Encounter of Reading in Higher Education: Literacy in Everyday Life La Universidad de Guadalajara Friday, November 25, 2017 9:00am-10:00 am
  2. 2. What we’ll talk about • Metaliteracy – What it is – How it complements/extends literacy – Applicability of its learning objectives • Metaliteracy-related projects – Digital badging system – MOOCs • Q & A 2
  3. 3. • “750 million youth and adults still cannot read and write” • “250 million children are failing to acquire basic literacy skills.” • “This results in an exclusion of low-literate and low-skilled youth and adults from full participation in their communities and societies.” – (UNESCO, Literacy) 3 Literacy Inequalities
  4. 4. “Beyond its conventional concept as a set of reading, writing and counting skills, literacy is now understood as a means of identification, understanding, interpretation, creation, and communication in an increasingly digital, text mediated, information-rich and fast-changing world” (UNESCO, Literacy). 4
  5. 5. 5 http://www.un.org/sustainabledevelopment/sustainable-development-goals/
  6. 6. 6 https://sustainabledevelopment.un.org/sdg4
  7. 7. “…digital literacy transcends the basic operations of using a technology…learners must be able to combine those skills with reflection, imagination, and awareness of their implications …” (NMC.org, p. 1). 7
  8. 8. “Taken together, globally, there is a large- scale, big picture move towards transforming learners and users into digital creators” (NMC.org, p. 12). 8
  9. 9. “At some point, production may become as essential to digital literacy — indeed, to social life — as consumption. If that future comes to pass, now is the time to creatively and collaboratively prepare for it” (NMC.org, p. 34). 9
  10. 10. THE WEB IS PARTICIPATORY 10
  11. 11. 11 Rafael Lozano-Hemmer, “Vectorial Elevation, Relational Architecture 4”, 1999 Zocalo Square, Mexico City, México. http://www.lozano-hemmer.com/vectorial_elevation.php
  12. 12. 12 Rafael Lozano-Hemmer, “Vectorial Elevation, Relational Architecture 4”, 1999 Interactive art installation 18 searchlights controlled by 3D Interface 800,000 participants from 89 countries Zocalo Square, Mexico City, México.
  13. 13. • Promotes critical thinking and collaboration • Provides a framework to effectively participate in social media and online communities • Supports acquiring, producing, and sharing knowledge in collaborative online communities 13 Thomas P. Mackey and Trudi E. Jacobson “Reframing Information Literacy as a Metaliteracy” College & Research Libraries. January 2011 72:62-78. http://crl.acrl.org/content/72/1/62.full.pdf
  14. 14. Metaliteracy: Reinventing Information Literacy to Empower Learners (Mackey and Jacobson, 2014). “While literacy is focused on reading and writing, and information literacy has strongly emphasized search and retrieval, metaliteracy is about what happens beyond these abilities to promote the collaborative production and sharing of information” (p. 6).
  15. 15. Metaliteracy: Reinventing Information Literacy to Empower Learners (Mackey and Jacobson, 2014). “The use of the term metaliteracy suggests a way of thinking about one’s own literacy. To be metaliterate requires individuals to understand their existing literacy strengths and areas for improvement and make decisions about their learning” (p. 2).
  16. 16. 16 “Metaliteracy asks that individuals understand on a mental and emotional level the potential impact of one’s participation.” (Mackey & Jacobson, 2016) ” Mackey & Jacobson, How can we learn to reject fake news in the digital world?
  17. 17. Metaliteracy in Practice (Jacobson and Mackey, 2016). “Metaliteracy applies to all stages and facets of an individual’s life. It is not limited to the academic realm, nor is it something learned once and for all” (Preface).
  18. 18. Metaliteracy in Practice (Jacobson and Mackey, 2016). “Indeed, metaliteracy focuses on adaptability as information environments change, and the critical reflection necessary to recognize new and evolving needs in order to remain adept” (Preface).
  19. 19. Four Domains of Metaliteracy Metacognitive: what learners think about their own thinking—a reflective understanding of how and why they learn, what they do and do not know, their preconceptions, and how to continue to learn). Cognitive: what students should know upon successful completion of learning activities— comprehension, organization, application, evaluation) Affective: changes in learners’ emotions or attitudes through engagement with learning activities) Behavioral: what students should be able to do upon successful completion of learning activities— skills, competencies Mackey and Jacobson (2014) Metaliteracy: Reinventing Information Literacy to Empower Learners
  20. 20. Learner Roles Mackey and Jacobson (2014) Metaliteracy: Reinventing Information Literacy to Empower Learners
  21. 21. I’d love to see my students take on the role of… Quick Reflection
  22. 22. METALITERACY GOALS AND LEARNING OBJECTIVES 22
  23. 23. 23https://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/File:WikimediaMosaicCapture.png#/media/File:WikimediaMosaicCapture.png Value user generated content
  24. 24. 24 Michelle Ebanks Barbara Masekela See self as producer and consumer
  25. 25. https://metaliteracystudent.tumblr.com Demonstrate ability to connect learning and research strategies
  26. 26. Assess dynamic content critically 26 Image: Blue Fountain Media
  27. 27. Understand feedback mechanisms and context in traditional and social media platforms 27 https://www.ifla.org/drupal/publications/node/11174
  28. 28. Understand Personal Privacy, Information Ethics and Intellectual Property 28Image from the article, How can we learn to reject fake news in the digital world?
  29. 29. Apply copyright and Creative Commons to original or repurposed information 29 https://www.flickr.com/photos/21907270@N05/2117607887
  30. 30. Determine the value of formal and informal information 30 https://textbooks.opensuny.org/the-information-literacy-users-guide-an-open-online-textbook/
  31. 31. Share Information and Collaborate in Participatory Environments 31
  32. 32. 32 Metaliterate Learner Characteristics Adaptable Participatory
  33. 33. METALITERACY LEARNING PROJECTS 33
  34. 34. METALITERACY DIGITAL BADGING SYSTEM http://suny.dsbeta.com/ (beta) and Metaliteracybadges.org (permanent) 34
  35. 35. ❖ A record of achievement ❖ Acknowledgement of an accomplishment ❖ Indication of a proven skill ❖ Evidence of learning ❖ Verification of competency ❖ Validation of non-traditional skills or experiences What is a Digital Badge? The Badge CC BY-SA Kyle Bowen
  36. 36. Credly Page
  37. 37. The Metaliteracy Badges metaliteracy.org/learning-objectives
  38. 38. Implementations • UUNI 110: Writing and Critical Inquiry • Writing and Critical Inquiry • Principles of Career and Life Planning • Writing America • Information Literacy • Psychology of Academic and Personal Effectiveness • Honors Program • Classroom Literacy Instruction (graduate level course) • Research Methods (Informatics) • Current Policy Debates Viewed Through a Social Science Lens • China: People and Place • nciples of Career and Life Planning • AENG 240V: Writing America • UNL 207: Information Literacy • ESPY 120: Psychology of Academic and Personal Effectiveness • Honors Program
  39. 39. Learners are both students and teachers Students earned the Empowered Learner badge Team-based activities: • Developing potential badge content • Session with instructor of lower level writing course • Preparation for teaching • Teaching lower level students 41
  40. 40. C-MOOC http://metaliteracy.cdlprojects.com
  41. 41. https://www.coursera.org/learn/metaliteracy Empowering Yourself in a Connected World
  42. 42. • MOOCs must be designed with learners as central drivers of their learning • Foster lifelong learning competencies for self-regulation and learner agency • MOOCs are a decentralized learning model • Require a supportive pedagogy for students to take on active roles as participants, contributors and teachers 44 O’Brien, K., Forte, M., Mackey, T. P., Jacobson, T.E., “Metaliteracy as Pedagogical Framework for Learner-Centered Design in Three MOOC Platforms: Connectivist, Coursera and Canvas.” Vol. 9, No. 3. Open Praxis. 2017. As Pedagogical Framework
  43. 43. Gracias! ¿Prejuntas? 45
  44. 44. Thomas Mackey, Ph.D. Vice Provost for Academic Programs and Professor Office of Academic Affairs SUNY Empire State College Tom.Mackey@esc.edu @TomMackey Trudi Jacobson, M.L.S., M.A. Distinguished Librarian Head, Information Literacy Department University Libraries University at Albany, SUNY Tjacobson@albany.edu @PBKTrudi 46

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