SlideShare a Scribd company logo
GROUP
MEMBERS
Harshit Verma
181109002
Harshita Bamne
181109004
Shrikrishna
181109005
Minhaj Qureshi
181109009
Vedankur Kedar
181109011
Jhalak Agrawal
181109013
Umang Patel
181109015
Sai Teja
181109017
Shanmukh Praveen
181109020
Shefna S.
181109022
Tanmay Shende
181109025
Keerthan Chandra
181109027
Sushil Barkhania
181109029
J. Justin Andrews
181109030
Moulishree Khakhre
181109032
Pavan Sashidhar
181109033
Abhishek RS
181109041
Shravani Reddy
181109042
2
CONTENTS
MAPS
DEMOGRAPHIC DETAILS
CONCEPTUAL FRAMEWORK
PHYSICAL AND GEOLOGICAL CHARECTERSTICS
INFRASTRUCTURE DETAILS
ENVIRONMENTAL DETAILS
TRAFFIC DETAILS
CORE CITY AREA CHARECTERSTICS
HERITAGE SITES OF BHOPAL
PROPOSALS
3
LOCATION
MAP
Total Zonal Area
2.65 Sq. km
Source- GIS 4
W
A
R
D
M
A
P
Source- GIS 5
L
A
N
D
U
S
E
M
A
P
LANDUSE Area (Ha.) Land use %
Residential 124.46 46.93827
Commercial 79.85 30.11539
Recreational 10.5 3.99
PSP 17.4 6.58
Water body 10.8 4.07
Transportatio
n
20.3 7.65
Other 1.68 0.65
Total area 264.99 100
Source- CDP 2005, Google Earth 6
SLUM LOCATION MAP
S.NO SLUM NAME WARD NO.
1 Baag Munshi Khan 09
2
Chouki Emam Bada
Harijan Basti (Amar Basti
21
3 Islam Pura 23
4 Bhagwan Shahay Marg 23
5 Bhoi Pura 23
HERITAGE ZONE
Source- https://censusindia.gov.in/2011census/population_enumeration.html
7
PRIMARY CENSUS DATA
 Bhopal Heritage zone is the composition of 2, 3, 4 and 5 zones of city where the entire zones are not considered but several wards
from each zone are comprised a total of 7 wards 8,9,19, 20, 21, 22 and 23. The zones 2 and 5 are having the maximum population
proportion of the heritage zone.
WARDS
Total
households
Total
population
Male
population
Female
population
WARD NO.-8 6098 28392 14399 13993
WARD NO.-9 5622 28020 14267 13753
WARD NO.-19 3276 16417 8450 7967
WARD NO.-20 4498 21320 10870 10450
WARD NO.-21 4644 24515 12631 11884
WARD NO.-22 4044 17994 9174 8820
WARD NO.-23 3675 17094 8898 8196
TOTAL 31857 153752 78689 75063
HOUSEHOLDS & POPULATION DATA:
Source- https://censusindia.gov.in/2011census/population_enumeration.html 8
153752
78689 75063
0
20000
40000
60000
80000
100000
120000
140000
160000
180000
Total population Male population Female population
Heritage zone population composition Ward wise population with gender segregation:
 As the Heritage zone is taken as the ward wise composition. The data is also analyzed as per the
ward data. The combined data of stats shows that the total number of households is 31,857. The
total population of the zone is 1,53,752 comprising of 78,689 male and 75,063 females.
 The number of households in wards 8 and 9 are larger in number with the maximum population over
28000. Whereas ward 21 has 4644 households and the population of 24515 indicates that the
minimum number of households comprise the large number of population.
 According to the census 2011 sex ratio of the zone is 954, which is actually a progressive female
ratio when compared to the Bhopal city sex ratio of 921.
Source- https://censusindia.gov.in/2011census/population_enumeration.html 9
Literacy data of zone :
 The heritage zone literacy rate is around 72%.
Whereas, the Bhopal metropolitan area has 85%
of literacy. Gender wise literacy share is as,
maximum percentage is towards male with 53%
and female are only 47%. The decline in the
literacy rate of heritage zone is because the
wards 8, 9, 21, 22 & 23 are having the maximum
number of illiterates with almost one third of their
population.
72%
28%
Literates v/s Illiterates
Total literates
Total illiterates
53%
47%
Literacy rate composition
Male literates
Female literates
WardsData Total Literates Total Illiterates
w.no-8 20465 7927
w.no-9 18473 9547
w.no-19 13515 2902
w.no-20 16994 4326
w.no-21 16425 8090
w.no-22 13199 4795
w.no-23 12198 4896
TOTAL 111269 42483
Source- https://censusindia.gov.in/2011census/population_enumeration.html 10
Employment data of zone :
35%
65%
Employment percentage
Total Working Population
Non Working Population
WardsData
Total Working
Population
Total Male
workers
Total Female
workers
Total Non-Working
Population
w.no-8 10635 7722 2913 17757
w.no-9 10720 7717 3003 17300
w.no-19 5650 4584 1066 10767
w.no-20 6654 5545 1109 14666
w.no-21 7571 6362 1209 16944
w.no-22 6171 4861 1310 11823
w.no-23 6033 4510 1523 11061
TOTAL 53434 41301 12133 100318
77%
23%
Male workers v/s Female workers
Total male workers
Total female workers
 The heritage zone employment percentage is just
35%. This decline is because of the more number of
marginal workers than main workers during the
period of data enumeration. At an average 2
persons are working from every household. Almost
2/3rd or more of every ward population are under
non-working. Out of total 35% of workers, 77% are
males and 23% are female workers.
Source- https://censusindia.gov.in/2011census/population_enumeration.html
11
PHYSICAL INFRASTRUCTURE
Household sizes in the zone:
0 5 10 15 20 25 30
1
2
3
4
5
6-8
9+
% of households
Household size composition %
Household sizes
1 2 3 4 5 6-8 9+
3.3% 8.08% 13.97% 23.04% 20.57% 25.4% 5.64%
Average household size of India according to the 2011 census is
4.45.The average household size of the Bhopal city is 4.7.
Average household size of the Heritage zone is the average of
the wards individual sizes i.e., 4.82.
Ward Household size
0008 4.65
0009 4.98
0019 5.01
0020 4.73
0021 5.27
0022 4.44
0023 4.65
Average 4.82
As the household size increases the
level of congestion also increases. By
this understanding, heritage zone has
the maximum congestion in wards 19
and 21.
Holistically data shows that more than
50% of households are having more
than or equal to 5 people residing in
the entire zone.
Source- https://censusindia.gov.in/2011census/HLO/HL_PCA/Houselisting-housing-HLPCA.html 12
Good
Livable
Dilapidated
63.94
33.3
2.75
Total % of households with built-up
condition
0 20 40 60 80 100
Total
Good
Livable
Dilapidated
Residential households condition
Total Good Livable Dilapidated
98.25 62.89 32.65 2.74
 According to census the criteria to categorize
existing condition of all the buildings in the zone are
given under three heads: Dilapidated, Livable and
Good condition. Out of which 64% of buildings are in
good condition, 33% of the buildings are just in livable
conditions and 3% are dilapidated. Out of the total
98.25% of existing residential blocks 63% are in good
32.65% are livable and 2.74% are dilapidated in
condition.
 The wards 8, 9, 22 and 23 are having lesser no. of
good condition households around or less than 50%.
That’s why there is the gradual increase in % of livable
and dilapidated households with the decrease of
good households in the context of total households.
 In the total 98.25 % of residential households also the
same 8,9,22 and 23 wards are having lesser number of
good households.
 Wards 19 & 20 are having more number of households
in good condition. Simultaneously resulting in less
number of dilapidated and just livable households.
Typology of the buildings:
Source- https://censusindia.gov.in/2011census/HLO/HL_PCA/Houselisting-housing-HLPCA.html 13
Main Source of Drinking Water
Tap
water
from
treated
source
Tap
water
from
un-
treated
source
Covered
well
Un-
covered
well
Hand
pump
Tube well/
Borehole
Spring River/
Canal
Tank/
Pond/
Lake
Other
sources
84.67 7.6 0.2 0.1 0.34 4.94 0.16 0.07 1.35 0.54
Water sources availability and proximity of sources:
Within premises Near premises Away
59%
32.50%
8.50%
Location of drinking water source
***The data is expressed in
terms of total % of households
using the various sources of
water. Location of the drinking
water source is the proximity
from the households to sources.
 The main sources of drinking water is maximum treated tap
water. Also untreated tap water is utilised by less than or
around 10% households in every ward. But some wards
depend on different sources like in ward no.8, 7%
households depend on tank/lake. 13, 7, 13% of households
in 9,19 and 21 wards depend on tube/bore wells.
 The major problem of away sources is mostly prevailing in
wards 8,9. Ward 20 has the sources with maximum no. of
households in premises. Where, the remaining wards are
having the percentages of households close to average
values in the graph.
Source- https://censusindia.gov.in/2011census/HLO/HL_PCA/Houselisting-housing-HLPCA.html 14
Sewerage and Sanitation facilities:
Closed drainage
Open drainage
No drainage
58.8
38.5
2.7
Household waste water connection
89%
11%
Households having sanitation facilities
Number of Households
having latrine facility within
premises
Number of Households not
having latrine facility within
premises
o Only 76% of households in the wards 19 and 20 are connected to the closed drainage system
and in rest of wards only around 50 % of the households are in closed connection to sewerage
system.
o The wards 9,21,22 and 23 are much worse in the case of sewerage connectivity with more than
50% of households are connected to open drainage system, whereas wards 19 and 20 are
better with less number of households connecting open drainage. The only ward no.8 with the
11% of households are not at all connected to any sewerage system.
o Out of 11% of households not having sanitation facilities, the wards 22 and 23 are having lesser
latrines and the ward no.8 is least in terms of sanitary facilities to the households with only 62% of
households having sanitation facilities.
15
CONCEPTUAL FRAMEWORK
PLANNING
PARAMETERS
PHYSICAL
ECONOMIC
ENVIRONMENTAL
SOCIAL
PLANNING
APPROACH
RATIONAL
COMPREHENSIVE
RADICAL
ADVOCACY
INCREMENTAL
SYSTEMATIC
Source- GIS
16
C
O
N
T
O
U
R
M
A
P
Source- GIS
17
S
L
O
P
E
A
N
A
L
Y
S
I
S
Chhawani
Hill Ridge.
Baghsewania
, Laharpur,
Amarawad
Khurd Ridge
Idgah Hill
Ridge.
Shamla Hill
Ridge
Arera Hill
Ridge.
Char Imli
Hill Ridge
Singar Choli
Hill Ridge.
Hill
configuration
around the
Kaliasote and
the Kerwa
Singhpur
Sewania
Gond Hill
Ridge.
Sewania
Gond Hill
Ridge.
Prempura-
Dharampuri
Hill Ridge.
Source- City Development Plan, Bhopal under JNNURM 18
PHYSICAL AND GEOGRAPHICAL CHARACTER
14 water bodies including
the two large lakes Upper
and Lower lake in the east.
Slopes
towards
north
Slopes
towards
southeast
general ground level: 460m- 500 m.
Hillocks range from
the Singacholi
(625m) up to the
Vindhyachal range
immense possibilities for landscaping and water front
Development for recreation.
Hills and lakes creates
physical barriers and
makes interlinks
inconvenient and
circuitous.
T.T. Nagar and its
are separated by the
old city by Upper
Lake and Lower
Lake.
BHEL Township is
separated from the
new town as well as
the old city by the
railway.
Source- City Development Plan, Bhopal under JNNURM 19
INFRASTRUCTURE
EXISTING SEWAGE SYSTEM
 The lakes are occupied by the human
settlements and receiving untreated/raw
sewage through no. of sewage fed
drains
 The anthropogenic pressure and inflow
of raw sewage in these lakes have made
the lake water quality to highly
deteriorated condition.
 Scheme: Prevention of Pollution Of
Upper Lake
 SEWER NETWORK: length- 23.5 km;
diameters- 150mm to 1200mm. 30 years
old
 The Upper and Lower lakes are together
called as the Bhoj Wetland.
 Upper Lake (11th century)
 catchments area: 361 sq km
 waterspread area: 31 sq km.
 Lower Lake (late 18th century)
 catchments area: 9.60 sq km
 water-spread: 1.29 sq km.
Motia Tank
Siddiqui
Hussain &
Munsi
Hussian
Shahpura
Lake
lower lake
Upper Lake
Kaliyasut
Reservoir
Halali dam
catchments
(patra nala)
Char Imli
Pond
Landiya
Talab etc.
Source- City Development Plan, Bhopal under JNNURM 20
INFRASTRUCTURE
STORM WATER DRAINAGE
Provided mainly by Patra nallah which receives flow from number of small channels running across the city, like:
Gaji Khan
ka nallah
Ashoka
Garden
nallah
Maholi ka
nallah
Jinsi
nallah
mahamai
Bagh ka
nallah
kale
Bhairon
ka nallah
 After Patra nallah, discharged into the Islamnagar river 18 km from Bhopal, which finally flows in to
the Halali river.
 Large portion of the city in the central region discharges storm runoff to Upper Lake and Lower lake.
 The entire network of Patra nallah is 50 kms
Source- City Development Plan, Bhopal under JNNURM 21
ENVIRONMENT
WATER POLLUTION
 Environmental Problems associated with the different water resources:
• Ground Water Contamination
• Chemical pollution
• Microbial Contamination
• Affecting Human Health due to Waterborne Diseases
 Historical pond of Siddiqui Hussain has become abandoned due to siltation and excessive growth of terrestrial
and aquatic plants and illegally refilled for construction of residential houses.
AIR POLLUTION
 Highest traffic density near Bharat Talkies so as the pollution level.
 The four hourly average SPM levels during 9-12 hours, 13-17 hours and 17-21 hours were 2200, 2045 and 2086
ug/cum, respectively.
 Constant monitoring of emission from vehicles and penal action against polluting vehicles required.
Source- City Development Plan, Bhopal under JNNURM 22
ENVIRONMENT
NAME OF WATER BODY SPREAD AREA (IN
HA)
PRESENT USE ECOLOGICAL STATUS
Upper lake 3100 Water supply
And recreation
Mesotrophic and part of the
lake is Eutrophic
Lower lake 129 Raw water Supply recreation Advance stage of Eutrophic
Motia Tank 1.89 Recreation Advance stage of Eutrophic
Siddiqui Hussain Tank 1.0 Recreation Bog lake
Munshi Hussain Khan Tank 1.2 Recreation Eutrophic
Lendiya Pond 1.5 Recreation Advance stage of Eutrophic
Char Imli Pond 1.2 Recreation Eutrophic
SURFACE WATER BODIES IN THE ZONE
Source- City Development Plan, Bhopal under JNNURM
Bhopal Talkies Intersection.
• High traffic intensity
• Heavy vehicle turning movements
• No Channelization, inappropriately
designed traffic islands
• Unsafe turning of vehicles at the
intersection
• No pedestrian facilities for safe crossing
at intersection
TRAFFIC
• Average traffic volume around bus stand: 80,000 PCU to 85,000 PCU along Hamidia road and Aishbagh Road.
• The presence of Bhopal railway station and bus stand in the area adds more problems.
• Absence of functional hierarchy of road network.
• Inter-mixing of local traffic with long distance traffic from Sagar road, Obedullaganj road etc.
• Overloading of some of the major roads like Hamidia Road joining bus stand to railway station, Lalghati to royal market to Kamla
park Road, chhola road etc.
Bus stand Chauraha
• Unorganised entry and exit
to Bus terminal (private).
• No facilities for
pedestrians and IPT (Auto
Rickshaw).
• High intensity of traffic
Royal market Intersection
• High intensity of traffic (over 1500 PCU in
peak hour)
• Considerable heavy vehicle movement, no
matching geometrics
• Available ROW restricted due to
encroachments
• Inappropriate signal phasing
• No pedestrian facilities.
Very
limited
scope of
road
widening
Very high
volume
of traffic Heterogeneous
traffic mix
High degree
of
pedestrian
movement
On
street
parking
INTERSECTIONS
23
Source- City Development Plan, Bhopal under JNNURM 24
CORE CITY AREA
SR.NO. Name of Corridor / Road Existing Carriage
way
Existing ROW
1 Kamla Park - Polytechnic 4L/F/NCW 20
2 Alpana Tiraha - Hamidia Rd
Junctions
Fly - Over
4L/F/NCW
21 Nos
1 Nos
30
3 Nadra Bus Stand 0.60 Kms
EXISTING CARRIAGE WAY AND ROW (Source; Integrated Urban Development in Madhya Pradesh,
Bhopal ADB)
Parking
intensity at
Bus stand
is alarming Main inter city
bus terminal-
Nadra Bus
Terminal
Terminal witness
high-density land
use, primarily
commercial and
PSP
Use of roads by
regional buses
further
congests the
roads which
have little
scope of
widening.
High volume of local
traffic
Nadra Bus
Terminal has
a total area of
3,758 Sq m
 The core has maximum population pressure, maximum intensity of building and
movement of traffic and services. The old CBD has gradually expanded its activities.
 Uniform skyline and forms an introvert residential neighbourhood.
 Mixed land use i.e. commercial over residential.
 The central market is a vibrant area with the road around C.B.D. areas carrying
palette of people. It is the multi functional regional market catering to the wider area
than just the city.
Heritage Sites of Bhopal
Taj-ul-Masajid
History
The construction work of this mosque started
in the reign of the Mughal Emperor Bahadur
Shah Zafar by Nawab Shah Jahan Begum
(1844–1860 and 1868–1901) of Bhopal (Wife of
Nawab Syed Siddiq Hasan Khan) and continued
to be built by her daughter Sultan Jahan
Begum, till her lifetime. The mosque was not
completed due to lack of funds, and after a long
lay-off after the War of 1857, construction was
resumed in 1971 by Allama Mohammad Imran
Khan Nadwi Azhari and Maulana Sayed
Hashmat Ali Sahab of Bhopal. The construction
was completed by 1985 and the entrance
(eastern) gate was renovated grandly using
ancient motifs from circa 1250 Syrian mosques
by the contribution of the Emir of Kuwait to
commemorate the memory of his departed
wife.
27
Architecture
And
Annual
Congregation
Architecture
The mosque has a pink facade topped by two 18-storey high
octagonal minarets with marble domes, an impressive main hallway with
attractive pillars and marble flooring resembling Mughal architecture the
likes of Jama Masjid in Delhi and the huge Badshahi Mosque of Lahore. It
has a courtyard with a large tank in the centre. It has a double-storeyed
gateway with four recessed archways and nine cusped multifold
openings in the main prayer hall. The massive pillars in the hall hold 27
ceilings through squinted arches of which 16 ceilings are decorated with
ornate petaled designs.
Annual Congregation
Aalmi Tablighi Ijtima is an annual three-day congregation that
draws people from all over the world. It was held at Taj-ul-
Masajid until it was shifted to Islam Nagar outside the city due
to shortage of space.
28
History
Kamalapati Palace lies on the eastern side of the ancient embankment known
as Bhojpal, built by the Parmara King Bhoj (AD 1010-1055) from which the
present name Bhopal is derived. The existing structure is a part of the palace
which was constructed by Rani Kamlapati, the widow of Nizam Shah, General
Chief of Ginnogarh in AD 1722. On the Western side of this palace are the
remains of Fatehgarh Fort on the hill which was built by Sardar Dost
Mohammad of Bhopal (AD 1708-1726) who laid the foundation of
modern Bhopal. Kamlapati palace is an example of contemporary secular
architecture of the early eighteenth century and the earliest extant example in
the Bhopal Town. This double storied building is constructed of lakhauri
bricks having a facade with cusped arches supported on the fluted pillars,
merlons having the shape of lotus petals and brackets supporting the
Chhajjas.This monument was declared protected by the Government of India
in 1989 and since then Archaeological Survey of India remains the custodian.
Kamalapati Palace
Source- Internet
Source- Internet 29
Moti Masjid is one of the many mosques located in
Bhopal, Madhya Pradesh. Even though the mosque is
relatively smaller in size as compared to the other
exquisite and historical monuments that stand
majestically in the 'city of mosques', the Moti Masjid is
of equal importance. This famous historic landmark
was built by Sikander Jehan Begum of Bhopal,
daughter of Qudusiya Begum, in the year 1860.
Sikander Begum was an unconventional woman who
abolished slavery and set up the trend of the
progressive woman in the entire city. Popularly known
as the Pearl Mosque, the mosque is located in the
heart of the city and represents the rich history of the
Bhopal Begums in India.
The architecture of the Moti Masjid in Bhopal has a
striking resemblance to the architecture of the Jama
Masjid in Delhi, except for the size. The Moti Masjid
features a white marble facade with two small cupolas
on the top. The two dark red towers on either side of
the primary structure of the mosque are equally
beautiful and fascinating.
Moti Masjid
30
The Shaukat Mahal was constructed in the 1830s as a
wedding gift for Sikander Jahan Begum, the first
female ruler of Bhopal. Architecturally it is a bit of an
oddity compared to other buildings in the heart of
Bhopal, the building has many western elements
combining both gothic and islamic themes. This is
due to the design being attributed to the Bourbons
of Bhopal, widely considered to be descendants of
renowned French kings.
Up until 2015 the building was in a terrible state with
ceilings collapsed and wide cracks appearing on the
majestic facade and interior walls. Despite this the
building still housed 21 families, but their safety
became a concern as the Mahal continued to decay.
This all sounds very familiar, a situation that the Taj
Mahal Palace in Bhopal has also experienced. But all
is not lost, as with the Taj Mahal Palace there are
plans in place to renovate the building, and here
they have already made an excellent start to that
process.
Shaukat Mahal
Source- Internet
31
The Taj Mahal at Bhopal was built as the Begum's
residence, at a cost of ₹ 3,000,000. Its construction
spanned over a period of 13 years, from 1871 to
1884. It was one of the largest palaces of the world
built at that time.
The building was originally named Raj Mahal ("royal
palace"). The British Resident at Bhopal, highly
impressed with the architecture, suggested that the
palace be renamed the Taj Mahal, the Taj
Mahal at Agra having been built by the Begum's
namesake Shah Jahan. The begum accepted the
suggestion and the palace was renamed to Taj
Mahal. The Begum is said to have ordered a three-
year-long celebration called Jashn-e-Taj
Mahal after the completion of the building.
Taj Mahal Palace
Source- Internet
32
Architecture
The architecture of Taj Mahal
has British, French, Mughal, Arabic and Hindu influences. T
he palace contains 120 rooms, a hall of mirrors or sheesh
mahal and the savon bhadon pavilion, an elaborate
fountain like structure that simulated the effect of rain. The
main entrance is a seven-storied structure. The palace
was part of a complex of buildings along the three lakes
that includes the Benazir Palace, which was the begum's
summer palace, and the Taj-ul-Masjid Mosque. The
palace has been built in the Indo-Saracenic style and is
kept cool by the winds blowing in from the lakes.
Source- Internet
33
Golghar Museum is a museum in Bhopal, India.
It showcases a variety of arts, handicraft and
social life from the Nawab-era. The museum
was inaugurated in April 2013 by Culture
Minister Laxmikant Sharma.
Golghar Museum
Source- Internet
34
PROPOSALS
Source- Urban Mobility India and Draft Bhopal Development Plan 2031 35
PARKING
• Parking is an essential component of the
transportation system.
• Affects the ease of reaching destinations and
therefore affects overall accessibility.
• One of the key links between transport network
and land-use
• Problems can be often defined either in terms of
supply (too few spaces are available, somebody
must build more) or in terms of management
(available facilities are used inefficiently and
should be better managed).
• Specific Parking Management for the core city
zone shall be prepared to support development
regulations for the walled city
SCENARIO OF INDIAN STREET IN CORE CITY AREA
36
METHODOLOGY
Proposal
Concept
Problem Identification
Analysis of Data
Data Collection
Current scenario
Source- GIS 37
R
O
A
D
N
E
T
W
O
R
K
A
N
D
B
U
I
L
T
U
P
Source- Urban Mobility India & MP town and country planning 38
EXISTING
SCENARIO
• The grid iron planning is around 400 years old, still famous as
commercial hub but was Old city Area design for pedestrian
movement.
• The core area is having commercial land use.
• The streets are 1 lane with their width varying between 22 to
3.5 m.
COMMERCIAL CITY CENTRE
GENERAL COMMERCIAL CENTRE
EDUCATION
HEALTH
ADMINISTRATIVE
RECREATIONAL FOREST
RECREATIONAL CITY PARK
RECREATIONAL PLAY FIELD STADIUM
RESIDENTIAL
WATERBODY
39
AIMS AND
OBJECTIVES
• To provide a congestion free roads so as to
increase mobility and accessibility.
• To encourage non-motorised means of
transportation for social and environmental
improvement.
• To reduce dependence on the car.
• To ensure that car parking provision and
enforcement are broadly self-financing.
Source- Urban Mobility India 40
DEMAND FOR
PARKING
Source- Urban Mobility India 41
DEMAND FOR PARKING-ON STREET (WEEKDAY)
• Highest parking
accumulation is observed on
street 15 i.e. 37.5 followed by
30 at street 6. There is no
significant variation in terms
of duration of parking
• The average turnover in study
area is 3.93.
ACCUMULAT
ION
SUPPLY
(L/2.5)
OCCUPANCY
/ PARKING
INDEX
LOAD FOR 6
HRS. (VEH.
HR)
PARKING
VOLUME
(VEH/DAY)
TURNOVER
FOR 6HR.
PARKING
DURATION
(MINS)
Street 1 24.5 30 81.67 147 133.75 4.46 65.94
Street 2 25.5 30 85 153 69.75 2.33 131.61
Street 5 8.5 30 28.33 51 43.25 1.44 70.75
Street 4 8.75 30 29.17 52.5 24 0.80 131.61
Street 5 11.5 30 38.33 69 52 1.73 79.62
Street 6 30 30 100 180 266.75 8.89 40.49
Street 7 26 30 86.67 156 135.5 4.52 69.08
Street 8 25.5 30 85 153 149.25 4.98 61.51
Street 9 12.25 30 40.83 73.5 133 4.43 33.16
Street 10 12.5 30 41.67 75 107.5 3.58 41.86
Street 11 18.25 30 60.83 109.5 108.75 3.63 60.41
Street 12 26 30 86.67 156 92.25 3.08 101.46
Street 13 13 30 43.33 78 51.5 1.72 90.87
Street 14 16 30 53.33 96 54.75 1.83 105.21
Street 15 37.5 30 125 225 291.75 9.73 46.27
Street 16 27.75 30 92.5 166.5 187.75 6.26 53.21
Street17 21 30 70 126 95.5 3.18 79.16
Street 18 21 30 70 126 116 3.87 65.17
Street 19 18.75 30 62 112.5 176.75 5.89 38.19
Street 20 14.25 30 47.5 85.5 69.5 2.32 73.81
Source- Urban Mobility India 42
DEMAND FOR PARKING-ON STREET (WEEKEND)
• Highest parking accumulation is observed on street 11 followed by street 13. Longer Duration
commuter i.e. Shopkeepers are found more.
• The average turnover in study area is 2.75.
ACCUMULATIO
N
SUPPLY
(L/2.5)
OCCUPANCY/
PARKING INDEX
LOAD FOR 6
HRS. (VEH. HR)
PARKING
VOLUME
(VEH/DAY)
TURNOVER FOR
6HR.
PARKING
DURATION
(MINS)
Street 1 9.25 30 30.83 55.5 34.25 1.62 97.23
Street 3 8.25 30 27.5 49.5 33.75 1.47 88
Street 4 17.5 30 58.33 105 35.25 3.98 178.72
Street 5 13.5 30 45 81 39.5 2.05 123.04
Street 6 16.25 30 54.17 97.5 39.5 2.47 148.1
Street 11 23.25 30 77.5 139.5 76.75 1.82 109.06
Street 13 23.5 30 78.33 141 20.5 6.88 412.68
Source- Urban Mobility India 43
DEMAND FOR PARKING-OFF STREET
• Highest parking accumulation is observed at Chhattorigalli Multi Level Parking Plaza as the location
is near to chowk bazaar road.
• More than 50% of vehicles were parked for more than 4 hrs.
• Gauhar Mahal parking lots is not used after 6:00 pm.
• The average turnover of off street parking lots is around 4.9.
ACCUMU
LATION
SUPPLY
(L/2.5)
OCCUPANC
Y/
PARKING
INDEX
LOAD FOR
6 HRS.
(VEH. HR)
PARKING
VOLUME
(VEH/DAY)
TURNOVER
FOR 6HR.
PARKING
DURATION
(MINS)
Gauhar Mahal 43.75 47.5 92.11 262.5 63.5 4.13 248.03
Moti Masjid
(Water Tank)
27 27 100 162 38 4.26 255.79
Imbrahimpura 58.75 68.75 85.45 352.5 82.25 4.29 257.14
Chattorigalli 77.5 102.5 75.61 465 02.75 4.53 271.53
Payga 28 30 93.33 168 57 2.95 176.84
Purana Kabad
Khana
52 60 86.67 312 72 4.33 260
Moti Masjid 33 35 94.29 198 42 4.71 282.86
Source- Comprehensive Mobility Plan 44
DEMAND FOR
PARKING
Total population of Bhopal City (M. Corp) 2011 1798218.00
Per Capita Trip Rate In Bhopal City (CMP2012 ) Including
Intra-zonal Trips
1.37
Total Trips Of Bhopal 2463558.66
Total Trips Attracted In Study Area (%) 8.02
Total Trips Attracted In Study Area 197577.40
Mode Modal Split (%) Trip generated in
study area
ECS
2 wheeler 25 49394.35 12348.58
car 3 5927.32 5927.32
Total parking Demand in Study area 18275.90
Source-Urban Mobility India 45
PARKING SUPPLY
Total area of road in study area 276407sq. M
Area of 1 parking in commercial area (2.5x5) sq. m 12.5 sq. m
Total no. of on street parking 14440
Total area under parking 180500 sq. m
Total area of road under parking 65.3%
2 Wheelers 4 Wheelers Total ECS
Gauhar Mahal 30 40 55
Moti Masjid 27 27
Imrahim Pura 15 65 72.5
Chattori Galli 10 100 105
Payga Parking 30 30
Purana Kabad Khana 60 60
Moti Masjid (Peer Gate) 35 35
Total Off Street Parking Supply 385
Source-Urban Mobility India 46
PARKING SUPPLY • Total parking supply – 14826
• 385 ECS is legal off street supply which is owned
by the corporation and managed by private
contractors.
• Parking lots are having only parking for four
wheeler
• Thus all two wheeler parking ends up on the road.
• This creates obstruction in free vehicular
movement.
8507
5933
385
14826
0
2000
4000
6000
8000
10000
12000
14000
16000
Parallel 90 Parking Parking Total
47
PRBLOEM
IDENTIFICATION
• Due to lack of proper parking for 2 wheelers, people park on
roads.
• There is no proper system of on-street parking this leads to
absurd parking on roads.
• People park on streets for long duration of time, this causes
inconvenience for people just want a quick stop.
• Roads are narrow near some residential places this forces
people living in these areas to park their vehicles at the nearest
possible location available, which is undesirable.
48
PROBLEM
IDENTIFICATION
Source- ITDP
49
CONCEPT
CBD/Commercial/Developed Area
Suburban/Residential/Developing
Area
Short
(5 years)
•Provision of on-street parking
•Preparation of regulation relating to
parking and PPP
•Building regulation for off-street
parking
•Introduction of resident permit
scheme (for on-street parking)
•Assessment of demand
Medium to
Long
(10-20 years)
•Provision of off-street parking
•Building regulation for off-street
parking
•Implementation of regulation and
enforcement for on-street parking
•Provision of on-street parking
•Demand analysis
Items On-Street Parking Off-Street Parking
Required Physical
Changes
Painting, installation of signage,
parking meters, etc.
Securing for land, paving,
installation of toll collection system,
other equipment, and construction
of administrative buildings etc.
Time for
Development
Relatively short (selection of site,
painting etc.)
Relatively long (Arrangement for
finance, and construction of
facilities)
Operational
Arrangement
Inspection (enforcement) by
traffic police or private sector is
required
Enforcement is not required and
the facility can be operated solely
by private sector
Targeted Users Short term (casual users)
Short to long term (monthly tenants,
regular users)
Source-https://sti-india-uttoolkit.adb.org/mod4/se2/001.html
50
CONCEPT
• Provision of accessible battery operated coaches
and boarding points for transfer from parking lot to
monument entrances especially for PWD’s and
elderly.
• Accessible parking bays for removal and set up of
a wheelchair from the boot of a vehicle or for use
of a rear or side mounted wheelchair hoist.
• To remove obstacles from carriageways thereby
improving the steady flow of traffic and increasing
carriageway capacity
• To contribute to a city’s economic activities by
ensuring a ‘turnover’ of different vehicles rather
than long stay vehicles in commercial areas
• To satisfy social objectives of supplying adequate
parking space at certain locations for certain social
groups e.g. residents, mobility disadvantaged
Source- Generic Guidelines for Accessible Monuments under ASI and National Urban
Transport Policy for India, Ministry of Urban Development, Government of India, April 2006.
51
PARKING POLICY
Source- National Urban Transport Policy for India, Ministry of Urban Development,
Government of India, April 2006.
• Optimize existing parking capacity, before creating
new parking facilities.
• Prioritize parking in the following order: physically
disadvantaged, residents, short-term visitors or
commercial activities, long-term parkers such as work
commuters.
• Utilize fees and fines from parking to invest in the
building of car parks and to improve public transport.
• Develop public-private partnerships (PPP) for the
operation of either on-street or (more often) off-
street parking facilities.
52
CASE STUDY- PRAYAGRAJ
Source- Comprehensive Mobility Plan for Allahabad 2012
Parking was a major problem in the city due to insufficient off-street parking facility, unorganized off-street
parking. During peak hours proper parking spaces got filled by local traders and shop owners itself. It was
observed that 56% was 2-wheelers, 32% was 4-wheelers and rest was 3 wheelers or NMT.
There was a large demand and supply gap, as there was excess demand for on-street parking as there was
inadequate off-street parking, lack of organised on-street parking facilities, and lack of strict enforcement
mechanism, vehicles were parked on-street in an unorganised manner which caused congestion and reduction of
traffic speed.
This demanded for the creation of off-street parking and organized on-street parking facilities.
Source- Comprehensive Mobility Plan for Allahabad 2012 53
PRAYAGRAJ PARKING PROPOSAL
• CMP for Allahabad proposed the creation of
off-street parking facilities in order to augment
the parking supply.
• And also seeks to discourage the use of private
vehicles by promoting public transport, parking
lots for private vehicles at major transit
interchange nodes such as bus terminals, bus
stations as park and ride facility and thereby
reducing private vehicle ownership so as to
restrict the demand for parking.
• Differential rate scheme for parking depending
upon the location of parking, i.e., the parking
rate at places other than the transit interchange
node would ne 1.5 to 2 times higher.
• Regulation of on-street parking to enforce
proper mechanism. And reducing the demand
on parking and congestion on roads.
PHASES PROJRCT COST (Rs Crore)
Short Term:
2013-2016
Off-street
parking
18
On street
Parking
0.67
Medium Term:
2017-2021
Creation of Park
and ride
facilities
57
Total 75.67
54
FUNDING OF
PRAYAGRAJ
PROJECT
• JNNURM
1. Government of India grant under JnNURM: 50%
2. State Government grant under JnNURM: 20%
3. Contribution from Cities/ ULBs: 30%
• Cess on Turnover
• Betterment Levy through Value Capture Mechanism
• Shops and Establishment Levy
• Viability Gap Funding
Source- Comprehensive Mobility Plan for Allahabad 2012
55
PROJECT AFTER
COMPLETION
Although there is on-street parking and proper enforcement but still
due to shortage of off-street parking there is congestion.
To reduce this planning only for proper parking is not sufficient, we
have to think about NMT and pedestrian movements as well.
56
PROPOSALS
Source- Institute for Transportation and Development Policy
Create a parking management unit that brings together urban local bodies, traffic police, and other stakeholders.
Staff the parking management unit with competent professionals who are capable of monitoring system
operations. Engage service providers to set up and operate the system in return for a performance-based service
fee.
For better management of parking we can adhere to the following-
1. Implement Smart Parking System
2. Use parking revenue to build people friendly streets
3. Price parking to manage demand
4. Restrict the supply of parking
5. Improve access to transit
57
BASIC IDEA
Source- Institute for Transportation and Development Policy 58
IMPLEMENT SMART PARKING
Mark parking slots
Install customer oriented
parking systems
Source- Institute for Transportation and Development Policy 59
IMPLEMENT SMART PARKING
Disseminate information about
parking policies
Source- Institute for Transportation and Development Policy 60
IMPLEMENT SMART PARKING
Enforce parking rules
61
PROPOSED PARKING
• Parallel on street parking for road for 2 and 4 wheelers.
• Perpendicular off street parking for 2 and 4 wheelers.
• Creation of off-street parking near residential areas so that people living near narrow lanes can
park their vehicles.
62
PROPOSED ROADS AND AREAS FOR PARKING
Length of 20-22 meter roads- 2092 m.
PROPOSED OFF STREET
PARKING
STREETS FOR ON-STREET
PARKING
Length of 12-15 meter roads- 11,565 m
Length of 7 meter roads- 7,165 m
Area of the off parking region- 9965 m. sq
63
PROPOSED
PARKING SPACE
WIDTH PARKING LANE LENGHT TOTAL PARKING
LENGTH
7 METRE 1 7165 M 7165 M
12-15 METRE 2 11565 M 23130 M
20-22 METRE 2 2092 M 4184 M
TOTAL 20822 M 34479 M
LENGTH/AREA OF
ROAD/PLOT
LENGTH/AREA OF A
PARKING
NO. OF PARKINGS
34479 M 5 M 6896
9965 M. SQ. 12 M. SQ. 830
TOTAL 7626
By leaving space for commutation within the plots the total parking space
can be about 7000 ECS. Apart from this there already exist 7 parking. By
adding them we get a total of 7385 ECS.
64
CONTROL OF PARKING
Building density doesn’t create traffic—more parking does. So build transit, add density, and cut parking!
Source- Institute for Transportation and Development Policy
65
RESTRICTING
SUPPLY
Rather than creating parking in a fixed ratio to built space, limit the supply
of off-street parking and charge separately for it.
Rent parking spaces separately
Cap parking but allow density
Charge for off-street parking
Remove parking minimums
Source- Institute for Transportation and Development Policy
Source- Institute for Transportation and Development Policy 66
PRICE PARKING
The price of parking influences user choice. When demand is high, increase the price so that people
who have the highest willingness to pay are able to find vacant slots.
Charge on high-occupancy streets
Set price based on
Start charging for parking on
streets with peak-period
occupancy greater than 60 per
cent. Increase the price when
demand is high—i.e., when
occupancy is more than 90 per
cent.
Location
Parking duration
Vehicle size
Time of day
67
PRICE PARKING
Source- Institute for Transportation and Development Policy
68
BUILD
PEOPLE
FRIENDLY
STREETS
Source- Institute for Transportation and Development Policy
Use surplus parking revenue to fund zonal improvements
that shift people away from cars and towards walking,
cycling, and public transport.
69
IMPROVE ACCESS TO TRANSIT
Don’t build park-and-ride facilities in urban centers. Instead, improve transit access by creating a dense
network of walking, cycling, and feeder service routes.
Source- Institute for Transportation and Development Policy
70
IMPROVE ACCESS TO TRANSIT
• Increasing the number of charted bicycles so promote NMT
• Introducing battery operated coaches to provide accessibility.
71
IMPACT OF PROPOSAL
SOCIAL IMPACT
ECONOMIC IMPACT
ENVIRONMENTAL IMPACT
PHYSICAL IMPACT
• This will encourage people to use
bicycles or to walk, hence improving their
health.
• Congestion free environment helps
reducing the stress level of people.
• Promoting the use of NMT would go a long way
in reducing air pollution
• Congestion leads to honking, which in turns
lead to noise pollution. This proposal will help
to reduce it.
• Introducing battery operated rickshaws would
help create employment for the people.
• Congestion free roads would attract more
people to the commercial area, hence
creating more revenue.
• Proper parking would lead to congestion free
roads.
• Encouraging NMT would help in improving the
landscape.
72
RESOURCE MOBILIZATION AND IMPLEMENTATION
Resource mobilization and implementation is an integral part of any plan as it tells us the feasibility of our plan.
Within resource mobilization and implementation there are various aspects that come-
• Institutional Set-Up for Implementation
• Physical Infrastructure Development Phasing
• Resource Mobilization for Implementation through Public Private and Other Sources
73
INSTITUTIONAL
SET-UP FOR
IMPLEMENTATION
For this proposal various infrastructures have to be set up-
• On-Street parking has to be demarcated.
• Off-Street parking has to be made.
• Pay and Park Facility
• Control Centres are to be set up
• CCTV cameras are to be set at various locations
• Chartered bicycles stands
• Battery operated rickshaw stand
74
PHYSICAL
INFRASTRUCTURE
DEVELOPMENT
PHASING
Phase Project
Short Term (3 Years) On Street Parking
Off-Street Parking
Setting up of control centre
Setting up of CCTV
Chartered Bicycles
Battery operated rickshaw stand
Medium Term (5 Years) Making pedestrian friendly roads
75
RESOURCE MOBILIZATION
FOR IMPLEMENTATION
Shops and Establishment Levy
Viability Gap Funding
Cess on Turnover
PPP Model
76
CONTINGENCY PLAN
Metro station would be built in
the area and it would tale some
bulk from the traffic.
FAR of 2.0 is allowed within the site, so
off-street parking can be upgraded as
per the need.
77
VISUAL PRESENTATION OF PROPOSAL
78
PEER GATE PROPOSAL
79
INTRODUCTION
• An integrated planning approach to
focus on revitalisation of obliviated
heritage sites, by emphasizing on
Heritage conservation and Urban
Transport policy.
• Supplement to the ongoing metro
project, to make the area vibrant in
social, economical, heritage
conservational, environmental and
physical aspects.
• Modelling the behaviour of people
towards non motorised transport and
active mobility.
ECONOMY
PSYCHOLOGY
SOCIETY
Source- Active Mobility Bringing Together Transport Planning,
Urban Planning, & Public Health
80
METHODOLOGY
PLANNING PARADIGM
Implementation of norms
for the construction of
Underground Metro
Station, rendering the area
to be prohibited for traffic.
The behavioural
change in the
people make them
use active mode of
transport often.
Dynamic survey to be
held to understand
the contemporary
demands of people.
Implement the policies and
norms according to the
survey insights, to formulate
which type of infrastructure
is required.
An INCREMENTAL as well as STRATEGIC approach of planning
in evidently required to alter the socio-economic,
infrastructural and psychological environment of the proposed
area. Integrated approach of planning legislation, planning
practices and state of the art technologies can achieve it.
Based on Public Private Partnership the model shall work in the
following steps.
81
PROBLEM IDENTIFICATION
TRAFFIC FLOW
STATION VEHICLES PASSENGER CAR UNIT PASSENGER PASSENGER -PHPDT PCU-PHPCT
CURFEW WALI
MATA KA MANDIR
41258 28692 107162 6730 1842
Source- TRAFFIC FLOW: Traffic Pre-Feasibility Study for Bhopal Metro Report, Delhi Metro Rail Corporation, Noise Meter Jinasys
NOISE POLLUTION
0
10
20
30
40
50
60
70
80
90
100
NOISE LEVEL GRAPH AT PEER GATE
DECIBEL PEAK DECIBEL EQUIVALENT SOUND PRESSURE
The Ambient Noise Level were recorded at the peak time of traffic
that is 18 hours 30 minutes, at the location on 6th November 2020.
The graph highlights that average equivalent sound pressure was
found to be 67.51 Decibels. The overall decibel revolves around 67
Decibels, but the average peak observations are recorded 83.19
Decibels. The Noise Pollution (Regulation & Control) Rules, 2000
focus on minimising noise levels to optimised and comfort value.
The readings have been recorded on noise meter app by jinasys.
Category of Area Day Time Night-Time
Industrial Area 75 70
Commercial Area 65 55
Residential Area 55 45
Special Area 50 40
Source- The Noise Pollution (Regulation and Control) Rules, 2000
82
AIR QUALITY INDEX
Source- National Air Quality Index, Central Pollution Control Board, Ministry of Environment, Forests and Climate Change; Breezometer App
The image highlights the air quality recorded on 6th November 2020, which highlights high amount of particulate matter, nitrous
oxide, ammonia, sulphur dioxide, carbon monoxide and ozone. The centre is located at TT Nagar, Bhopal. The ambient Air quality is
function to the location, which reduces in green cover and increases in dense urban form. Peer Gate location is situated at a nodal
point having extensive traffic and urban dense form, which eventually will increase the Air Quality Index to relatively unhealthy levels.
The proposal shall render the pollution levels, noise levels and traffic congestion problems reduce to great extent further
enhancing the comfort.
83
Source- Delhi ‘s Iconic Chandni Chowk Got A Makeover & Results Are Stunning, Chadni Chowk New Look – The Indian Express
SIMULATION RESULTS
Simulation modelling is essential to assess the output of proposal prior to its execution and its efficacy for different
parameters. The viability of project is assessed on past Case study on similar account, Isovist and Isochrone map.
84
Source- ARC MAP, Network Analyst tool
ISOCHRONE MAP FOR THE SITE
Simulation modelling in ARC
MAP highlights the distance
reachable within different time
durations from the metro
station.
The area encompassed within
10 minutes of walking speed in
one third of the old city
market.
The simulation was input with
walking speed of 0.8 meters
which was empirical defined
from past researches
conducted in the similar
setting around India. (Chandra
2013), (Rastogi 2011), (Laxman,
Rastogi and Chandra 2010)
Insights: Koohsari, M. J.-C. 2016
85
PEER GATE
PROPOSAL
ISOVIST MAP
Source- SUSHIL BARKHANIA - 181109029 86
Source- SUSHIL BARKHANIA - 181109029 87
Source- SUSHIL BARKHANIA - 181109029 88
Source- SUSHIL BARKHANIA - 181109029 89
Source- SUSHIL BARKHANIA - 181109029 90
Source- SUSHIL BARKHANIA - 181109029 91
Source- SUSHIL BARKHANIA - 181109029
92
93
Source- VEDANKUR KEDAR - 181109011
Source- SHRAVNI VJIAYSHANKAR REDDY -181109042 94
METRO
STATION
SECTION
Metro Station
Entrance
Concourse
Curfew Wali
Mata Ka Mandir
Metro
Station
Platform
Active mobility
and Non-
Motorised
Transport Can
be supported By
Multimodal
Transit Systems.
This renders,
Energy
Efficiency,
Pollution
Control, Health
of Citizen, and
Planned Growth
Source- SHRI KRISHNA KESARWANI -181109005 95
Source-Benefits of Pedestrianisation and Warrants of Pedestrianizing an Area; N. Soni and others. 96
BENEFITS & IMPACTS
97
HERITAGE GATES OF BHOPAL
Source- GIS 98
H
E
R
I
T
A
G
E
G
A
T
E
s
L
O
C
A
T
I
O
N
Source- https://www.goheritagerun.com/gates-of-bhopal/ 99
ARCHITECTURAL IMPORTANCE
• Cusped arch opening
• Upper part has arched space for the chobdars to
announce the coming and going of the nawab.
• Top parapet has a crown with finials and jail of brick.
• Islamic style-combination of stone and bricks.
HERITAGE GATES
• a square plan and has cusped arched opening.
• A decorated five arched parapet with a crown
mounted on the central arch Entrance of Sadar
manzil which leads into a smaller main gate.
• The first floor of the main gate has a huge terrace
balcony, while the second floor features four
domes, one in each corner.
MOTI MAHAL GATE
SADAR MANZIL GATE
• constructed in the 1830s as a wedding gift for
Sikander Jahan Begum, the first female ruler of
Bhopal.
• Architecturally it combines both Gothic and Islamic
themes and the design is attributed to a Frenchman.
SHAUKAT MAHAL GATE
• part of the Taj Mahal Complex.
• two tunnels through which the traffic moves
• The tunnels are of double height and are attached to
the extension of Taj Mahal Palace main domed
gateway
• The arch shaped structure dates back to the 1860s.
• There is a mosque on top of the arched ways.
TEEN MOHRE GATE 1
• part of the larger Taj Mahal palace complex.
• It is located at an inclined axis to the domed
gateway of the main palace.
• octagonal structure with ogee arch
• Built in dressed stone it is a solid, plain structure
• contrasts with other ornamental gates of Bhopal
• It is the remains of fortification wall that once encircled
the Idgah and reached right up to Benazir palace and
Sultania Infantry.
DAKHIL DARWAZA
BHOPAL GATE
Source- https://www.goheritagerun.com/gates-of-bhopal/ 100
ARCHITECTURAL IMPORTANCE
• The double arches of this gate are like military gate with
cusped arch on the outer side and ogee arch on the inner
side. The parapet and onion shaped finials at the four
corners of the gateway are the only ornamentation on the
otherwise plain facade.
HERITAGE GATES
• 300 year old; built by Dost Mohammed Khan
• located in the heart of the city’s market
• surmounted by thirty-six towers or bastions and
broken in numerous places by gates and entry ways,
both large and small.
• Set at regular intervals around the gate were the nine
main gates ; 6 were named after the days of the
week
• aligned to the north end of the central axis of the
city. The gate is flanked on both the sides by bastion
like circular towers.
POLICE GATE
JUMERATI DARWAZA
• located near Putlighar in Shahjehanbad area and it is a
famous gate during the Bhopal Nawab Era due to the
inscription on top of the gate.
ISLAMI GATE
three tunnels through which the traffic moves
built on an embankment over Motia Talab
Built of sandstone, the tunnels are of double height and are
attached to the extension of Taj Mahal Palace main domed
gateway
‘three’ is an integral number in all constructions during
Nawab Shahjahan Begum’s reign.
TEEN MOHRE GATE 2
• Benazeer Gate is highly decorated double
storeyed gate with two arched openings in a
three bayed structure.
• 130 year old; built by Nawab Shahjehan Begum in
1877 overlooking the Motia Talab
a simple gate with double arches.
The outer one has a cusped arch while the inner one an ogee
arch.
The gate is made of dressed stone and is topped with heavy
dome shaped chattaries at the four corners.
In the middle is the crown like parapet that is typical of Bhopal
architecture.
BENAZEER GATE
SULTANIA INFANTRY GATE
101
THE
DESTRESSED
GATES
The ancient structures lie in dilapidated states with threat of collapsing fort walls
and hanging stones posing a treat to losing life as well as the cultural relics
DEMOLISHED GATES
1. Peer gate
2. Imami gate
3. Bagh Farhat Afza gate
4. Lal Darwaza
FACES TRAFFIC
Heavy Traffic is faced by a
number of gates which
includes:
1. Bhopal Gate (rotary)
2. Islami Darwaza
3. Sadar Darwaza
4. Shaukat Darwaza
5. Teen Mohre 1 and 2
6. Dakhil Darwaza
7. Sultania Infantry gate
8. Police gate
Source- Google earth 102
EXISTING
ROAD
WIDTH
S.No Gates Road width (in m)
1. Sultania Infinity Gate 6
2. Kala Darwaza 6
3. Bhopal Gate/ Kabala
Gate
16
4. Teen Mohre 1/ Taj Mahal
Gate
9
5. Teen Mohre 2 9.
6. IslamiDarwaza 6
7. Shaukat Darwaza 12
8. SadarDarwaza 9
9. Police Gate 6
10. Lal Darwaza 5
11. ShahajahanabadGate/Da
khilDarwaza
6
12. Benazir Gate 5
13. Moti Mahal Darwaza 6
14. JumeratiGate 9
15. Bab e Ali Gate 9
16. Model Ground Gate 3.5
Source- Google 103
BCLL BUS
ROUTE
Bcll bus route
Road
Built up
Water body
Gate location
Zone boundary
Legend
Upper lake
lower lake
ShahajahanabadGate/
DakhilDarwaza
Sadar Darwaza
Shaukat Darwaza
teen Mohre 2
BCLL Bus- 2.8 M wide
104
PROPOSAL
EXISTING CONDITION
NARROW ROAD
•Traffic congestion
•Discontinuous
drainage system
•No sidewalk
•Decreasing road
width there by
narrowing ROW
Historical gate
Two lane undivided road
•No congestion
•Rotary design
•Side walk
•Continuous ROW
•Continuous
drainage system
•Conservation of
historical gate
•Street furniture's
PROPOSED (ROTARY)
PROPOSAL
EXISTING SITUATION OF SULTANIA
INFANTRY GATE
• Existing road width 6m
• Gate inner width 5 m
•Located on Regiment Road
•Lie on Y shaped intersection
Proposed (Rotary)
Sultania infantry Gate
ZONAL DEVELOPMENT PLAN OF HERITAGE ZONE BHOPAL PPT
107
PROPOSAL
PHOTO GALLERY
Shaukat Darwaza
Teen Mohre 2
The development of galleries over
the gates will provide a
picturesque location to the visitors
through the numerous citadels
present in the gates.
1. Shaukat mahal gate: The
ancient relic lies in the heart of
the city. Developing its visiting
gallery space will provide with
a heartwarming view of the
entire sequence of fort
monuments like the Moti
masjid, Shaukat mahal and
Sadar manzil , Iqbal maidan etc.
2. Teen mohre 2: It's high
mounted citadels are perfect
to capture the arching Tajul
masajid over the Motiya talab
and also to appreciate the
magnificence of the Taj mahal
palace
IMPACTS OF THE PROPOSALS
FOR THE HERITAGE GATES
109
IMPACTS
Physical Impact
• The proposed rotary not only improves the traffic condition,
reduces the traffic flow, provides sidewalk, continuous flow
of traffic, and continuous drainage but above all, the
proposed rotary enhances the beauty of the historical gate.
• To support this statement, here is a similar scenario of
another monument, that attracts a huge number of visitors
daily even though the traffic problem at this location is less.
• The proposed rotary will make the area more spacious and
wider open, which will enhance the physical state of the
area.
110
IMPACTS
Social Impact
• The proposals have a great social impact as these sites
are not even considered as historical sites by the local
people and the people don’t respect these historical gems.
• The proposals are being suggested on the basis of
enhancing the physical condition of these historical gates
and improving the social situation in the nearby vicinity.
• These proposals will impact the social views of the people
by changing it and making it more respectable. The
proposals are designed to attract the tourists to these
historical places which were untouched by them.
Environmental Impact
• The proposals have environmental impacts as
well. Though the rotary is proposed to increase
the traffic flow, the flow will not increase air
pollution as the flow is not unobstructed and
will be continuing that will not only act as a
barrier in stopping the air pollution from
increasing in the area but may reduce it.
• The proposed rotary focus on greenery near
the gates. Increasing the greenery will have a
positive impact on the environment.
111
IMPACTS
Economic Impact
• Though there is no direct economic impact but
with increase in the traffic flow the area will
also grow, with the introduction of a rotary new
shops will be opened that will improve the
economy of the area.
• Tourist attraction through photo gallery will
improve the economic scenario of the area and
the attraction of tourists at the rotaries will also
increase the revenue.
ZONAL DEVELOPMENT PLAN OF HERITAGE ZONE BHOPAL PPT
Source- Bhopal Development Plan 113
HERITAGE CONSERVATION AND MANAGEMENT
The Bhopal city is an amalgamation of different layers of Hindu, Islamic
and Colonial periods. The urban image of the city is a collective visual
appearance contributed by natural and manmade elements. The lakes,
hills, and heritage buildings, are significant parts of the traditional form of
the city that gives the city its heritage identity. The lakes, hills, and heritage
buildings, are significant parts of the traditional form of the city that gives
the city its heritage identity. The heritage areas which are interwoven with
natural features of city are the identity of the city. This unique urban
heritage contributing to the city identity and its image ought to be
preserved. Bhopal is gifted with rare monuments and splendid areas of
vulnerable architecture. The built heritage, comprising areas such as
Jumerati Gate, Jama Masjid, Moti Masjid, and Gauhar Mahal, etc., ought to
be dealt with utmost care and pride.
114
OBJECTIVE
Data Collection
Analysis of Data
Problem Identification
The object for Conservation of Heritage is to safeguard,
conserve, restore, manage and maintain the built heritage
of Bhopal city while regulating interventions and
development activities, which may have an impact on the
heritage.
Source- Bhopal Development Plan
115
PROBLEM
IDENTIFICATION
• The increasing population, vehicles, and dilapidation of
structures due to age are major causes of stress in city core.
• Lack of financing support mechanism for heritage structures
and precincts owned by private individuals leads to the
deterioration of heritage buildings and replacement by the
new structures.
• Also, these areas lack infrastructure and amenities to meet the
contemporary demands.
Source- Bhopal Development Plan
116
BHOPAL
DEVELOPMENT
PLAN
Data Collection
Analysis of Data
Problem Identification
• It encourages convert evasion and preservation of the
area falling within the old city zone.
• It has the regulations to incentivize the conservation of
heritage buildings for presence of heritage value
through heritage TDR
• Conservation of Heritage precincts and structures
within this zone, preparation of a “Heritage
Conservation and management plan (HCMP) for old city
zone”.
Source- Bhopal Development Plan
117
CONCEPT
While planning, the basic concept that we have to keep in mind
is to develop our zone to fulfill the contemporary demands while
preserving its heritage.
We need to sort out all the problems within the zone and
increase the footfall of tourist to generate revenue. And to do
so, we need to ensure the area is accessible for all.
Source- GIS 118
H
E
R
I
T
A
G
E
S
I
T
E
S
L
O
C
A
T
I
O
N
O
F
Monument Ward
Taj-ul-Masjid 20
Kamalapati Palace 22
Moti Masjid 22
Shaukat Mahal 08
Taj Mahal Palace
Golghar Museum 08
Teen Mohre Gate 1
Moti Mahal Gate 08
Dakhil Darwaza
Sadar Manzil Gate 08
Bhopal Gate 08
Shaukat Mahal Gate 08
Teen Mohre Gate 2
Police Gate
Benazeer Gate 08
Jumerati Darwaza
Sultania Infatntry Gate
Islami Gate Out of
our
zone
119
Data Collection
Analysis of Data
Problem Identification
PROPOSALS
To ensure that our area is accessible for all, we have given some
basic general proposals, which shall be detailed out in the
Heritage Conservation and Management Plan.
Accessible
Parking
External pathways
and landscape areas
Toilet
Facilities
Public
Counters
Source- Generic Guidelines for Accessible Monuments under ASI 120
ACCESSIBLE PARKING
• Provision of a large common parking lot at the entry
• Restriction of vehicular movement within heritage
site limits
• Signpost of international symbol of accessible
parking should be provided
• Accessible parking bays should have side and rear
transfer zones for removal and set up
• There should be well defined step free and barrier
free route with a tactile guiding path
• All security guides/ guards should be sensitized and
well informed about reserved parking for PWDs.
• Battery operated coach to be provided from
parking to site.
Source- Generic Guidelines for Accessible Monuments under ASI 121
EXTERNAL PATHWAYS AND LANDSCAPE AREAS
• Provision of continuous accessible pathways.
• Provision of gratings on open drains.
• Linkages and transitional spaces should not form
obstacles to users.
• Continuous tactile guide path should be provided
• Tree branches and plantings at sides of pathways
should be trimmed.
• There can be benches and chairs with arms and backs
at rest points along paths and routes.
Source- Generic Guidelines for Accessible Monuments under ASI 122
TOILET FACILITIES
• Accessible toilet blocks near the main entrance and exit of the heritage site.
• A full range of user-friendly provisions should be made to reach the toilet blocks.
• Accessible toilets should have the universally adopted symbol.
• Improvement to existing General toilets.
• Accessible toilet cubical to be provided in case individual toilet block is not possible.
Source- Generic Guidelines for Accessible Monuments under ASI 123
PUBLIC COUNTERS
• Publication counters should be at the suggested location.
• Tactile guide path should lead from the entrance to the publication counter.
• High and low counters should be provided.
• Space in front of the publication counter should be provided for queuing and waiting.
• A multi-media information panel to be provided adjoining the publication counter.
• Accessible directional, multilingual and tactile signage to be provided as per standards.
Source- Adopt A Heritage 124
IMPLEMENTATION AND RESOURCE MOBILIZATION
The plan or detailed proposals that shall be given in the Heritage Conservation and Management Plan
prepared by the urban local body can be implemented by the private sector. The basic idea is to follow the
“Adopt A Heritage” scheme initiated by the Ministry of Tourism.
The private company that shall adopt the heritage monument shall be known as “Monument Mitra”. The would
be tasked to analyse the existing scenario, prepare a visionary plan for the monument they adopt taking into
consideration the future demand of the place. Once the plan gets approved by the urban local body, the
“Monument Mitra” shall implement it and the run it for a certain period of time and the transfer it to the
government. Apart from revenue gain, the Monument Mitra shall have rights to the advertise in the site,
provided that it does not hinder the heritage feature of the site.
125
WATERFRONT DEVELOPMENT
126
Case study :Sabarmati riverfront development
127
NEED FOR RIVERFRONT DEVELOPMENT
The intensive uses took their toll on the river.
• Untreated sewage flowed into the river
through storm water outfalls and dumping of
industrial waste posed a major health and
environmental hazard.
• The river bank settlements were disastrously
prone to floods and lacked basic
infrastructure facilities. Lacklustre
development took shape along the riverfront.
Such conditions made the river inaccessible and
it became a virtual divide between the two parts
of the city.
Original condition of the river near Vadaj
128
PROJECT OBJECTIVES
• The project aims to provide Ahmedabad with a meaningful waterfront environment along the banks of the Sabarmati River
and to redefine an identity of Ahmedabad around the river. The project looks to reconnect the city with the river and
positively transform the neglected aspectsof the riverfront.
• The objectives of this multidimensional project can be categorized under threetopics-
• Environmental Improvement: reduction in erosion and flood to safeguard the city;sewage diversion to clean the
river; water retention andrecharge.
• Social Infrastructure: rehabilitation and resettlement of riverbed dwellers and activities;creation of parks and public
spaces; provision of socio-cultural amenities for thecity.
• Sustainable Development: generation of resources, revitalization ofneighborhoods
129
THE CHALLENGES
• 12000 hutments on both banks of the river
occupying nearly 20% of critical project
area.
• Unorganized Gujari Bazaar of more than
1200 vendors on the eastern bank and
Court Litigation.
• Nearly 200 Dhobis using both the banks
of the river for washing activities.
• Thoroughly polluted and contaminated
Sabarmati through 40 storm water outlets.
Source- xyz 130
PLANNING PRECINCTS
131
Success stories
• The Sabarmati Riverfront Project add almost 10,00,000 sq. mts. of parks, promenades and
plazas to Ahmedabad.
• The Sabarmati Riverfront Project help provide Ahmedabad with manynew cultural trade and
social institutions (36,000 Sq.m).
• Creating of City Level Recreational Activities – Water Sports andFloating
restaurants.
• Tourist attraction.
• Recharge of Ground water Aquifers of thecity
• Continuous Green coverage along the river corridor.
• Elimination of Flood Hazard.
• Creating Vibrant Urban neighborhoods and beautification of thecity.
• Achieved A Multidimensional Environmental Improvement, Social Upliftment and Urban
Rejuvenation Project
132
To save heritage
Lack of identification of heritage
Rapid urbanisation
Low priority to heritage as asset
Constant neglect & misuse.
Haphazard & uncontrolled development.
Large scale subdivision of land/ buildings
Change of land use/structure
Built heritage under enormous threat due to :
133
Making Heritage Part of Planning process
Involving communities
Involving academic/professional institutions
Legal framework and development regulations
Constituting heritage commissions/communities
To save heritage
134
Proposals – Water Front Development
Heritage display
Periodic Cleaning
Energy Generating
Pedestrian
Source- TRAFFIC PRE-FEASIBILITY STUDY FOR BHOPAL METRO 135
Energy
Generating
Pedestrian
• People are forced to use VIP Road as a view point.
• Traffic on VIP Road –
• Avg. Daily vehicular count – 45047
• Avg. daily passenger count - 109494.
• At least 8-9% of this traffic count consist of people wanting to
visit the upper lake.
• Provision –
• A pedestrian walking
• It will provide a safe space to admire the view and
• It will also generate energy through the kinetic
energy received from walking.
Source- Power Technology 136
Case study – “Intelligent Streets”, LONDON
• Installed in 2017.
• Traffic free, sustainable technology.
• Kinetic energy is used to meet the street’s energy needs along with solar energy.
• Working –
The flooring Is vertically displaced. Electromagnetic induction creates kinetic energy
which can be used to power devices.
• With one step – the pavement displaces vertically for
5mm. With per footstep – it generates 3 joules or 5 watts
of continuous power.
• That energy is either directly supplied to nearby
electronics or stored in a lithium polymer battery.
• Nine steps are enough to power one bulb.
Source- Power Technology 137
• Data about people's movements can be tracked via wireless technology, so the number of
footfalls and information about generated energy can be stored and analyzed in order to
monitor the effectiveness and efficiency of the project.
• Areas where the technology has already been trialed –
• Olympic park
• Heathrow airport
• Shell football pitch in Rio de Janeiro
• Saint-Omer train station in France
• Indoor as well as outdoor use.
138
The Upper Lake has both rural and urban catchments. With a
well-protected catchment, its water quality was of potable
standard until recently. In the last few decades of the 20th
century, however, many sections of the lake became surrounded
by habitations as the city grew.
These developments have generated anthropogenic pressures
on the lake, thus accelerating its eutrophication and microbial
contamination, and making the water unfit for human
consumption without proper treatment. Because the Lower Lake
is located within a completely urban catchment, it has been
subjected to many negative anthropogenic stresses, its water
quality degradation has been much more pronounced than for
the Upper Lake.
Water quality analysis of upper lake and lower lake
139
Water quality analysis of upper lake and lower lake
140
Problems and causes
Source- seabinproject.com 141
Periodic
Cleaning
• The quality of lake water has degraded over time due to waste
disposal and pollution and they are in dire need of regular and
proper cleaning.
• Also, Sea bins will be put to use
• Per year they can catch:
• 90,000 plastic bags
• 35,700 disposable cups
• 16,500 disposable water bottles
• 166,500 plastic utensils
Source- seabinroject.com 142
Sydney – SEABIN PROJECT
• The Sea bins were installed to prevent any more
deterioration of the Sydney harbour.
• In 12 months, 28 tonnes of marine debris was
captured and 4.3 billion litres of water was filtered.
• It is a smart-tech project solely focused on
environment.
The lakes are the ground water source of the water supply system of the city. The degradation
of quality of water must be prevented and sea bins can be of great use.
• The lakes contribute scenic and economic value. Cleaner lakes are better suited for the
heritage zone.
143
Heritage
Display
The city of Bhopal has a rich heritage but there is no place for
people to know it all.
Hence, a Heritage display Is planned along the VIP road to
exhibit pictures, videos and information about the history and
heritage of the city.
This corridor is to powered with solar power and the power to be
generated by the mechanism used in the pedestrian.
Source- GIS 144
G
A
L
L
E
R
Y
L
O
C
A
T
I
O
N
O
F
145
PROPOSAL’S CONCEPT VIDEO

More Related Content

What's hot

Master Plan & Delhi Master Plan
Master Plan & Delhi Master PlanMaster Plan & Delhi Master Plan
Master Plan & Delhi Master Plan
Sahil Kaundal
 
Navi mumbai development
Navi mumbai developmentNavi mumbai development
Navi mumbai development
smritigupta24
 
Sabarmati riverfront case study for development of yamuna riverfront agra
Sabarmati riverfront case study for development of yamuna riverfront agraSabarmati riverfront case study for development of yamuna riverfront agra
Sabarmati riverfront case study for development of yamuna riverfront agra
deeksha sharma
 
Urban redevelopment
Urban redevelopmentUrban redevelopment
Urban redevelopment
Amit Pokharel
 
46721953 magarpatta-city
46721953 magarpatta-city46721953 magarpatta-city
46721953 magarpatta-city
Bhairavi Gupta
 
A Slum Redevelopment Project
A Slum Redevelopment ProjectA Slum Redevelopment Project
Bye Laws and City Planning
Bye Laws and City PlanningBye Laws and City Planning
Bye Laws and City Planning
Khyati Tewari
 
CHANDNI CHOWK REDEVELOPMENT
CHANDNI CHOWK REDEVELOPMENTCHANDNI CHOWK REDEVELOPMENT
CHANDNI CHOWK REDEVELOPMENT
ARCHITECTURE SCHOOL
 
Chandigarh - planning and its transformation
Chandigarh - planning and its transformation Chandigarh - planning and its transformation
Chandigarh - planning and its transformation
Gagan Tanwar
 
Planning Theories presents in the city UJJAIN
Planning Theories presents in the city UJJAINPlanning Theories presents in the city UJJAIN
Planning Theories presents in the city UJJAIN
Praveen Mukati
 
urban studies NASHIK by GB
urban studies NASHIK by GBurban studies NASHIK by GB
urban studies NASHIK by GB
GajananBhamare
 
Bhubaneswar- Urban Planning
Bhubaneswar- Urban PlanningBhubaneswar- Urban Planning
Bhubaneswar- Urban Planning
Kharunya Chitravelu
 
Urban Villages of Delhi: Case study Kotla Mubarakpur
Urban Villages of Delhi: Case study Kotla MubarakpurUrban Villages of Delhi: Case study Kotla Mubarakpur
Urban Villages of Delhi: Case study Kotla Mubarakpur
Joel Michael
 
Neighbourhood planning
Neighbourhood planningNeighbourhood planning
Neighbourhood planning
College Of Engineering, Pune
 
TOD in India
TOD in IndiaTOD in India
urban design principles in CBD Belapur, Navi Mumbai
urban design principles in CBD Belapur, Navi Mumbaiurban design principles in CBD Belapur, Navi Mumbai
urban design principles in CBD Belapur, Navi Mumbai
ayan baraniya
 
Kolkata Metropolitan Development Plan
Kolkata Metropolitan Development PlanKolkata Metropolitan Development Plan
Kolkata Metropolitan Development Plan
Divya Kothari
 
ZONAL DEVELOPMENT PLAN OF HERITAGE ZONE BHOPAL
ZONAL DEVELOPMENT  PLAN OF  HERITAGE ZONE  BHOPAL ZONAL DEVELOPMENT  PLAN OF  HERITAGE ZONE  BHOPAL
ZONAL DEVELOPMENT PLAN OF HERITAGE ZONE BHOPAL
shrikrishna kesharwani
 
Auroville - City Planning
Auroville - City PlanningAuroville - City Planning
Auroville - City Planning
ams_5686
 
Chandigarh city planning by Le Corbusier
Chandigarh city planning by Le CorbusierChandigarh city planning by Le Corbusier
Chandigarh city planning by Le Corbusier
As Per Design
 

What's hot (20)

Master Plan & Delhi Master Plan
Master Plan & Delhi Master PlanMaster Plan & Delhi Master Plan
Master Plan & Delhi Master Plan
 
Navi mumbai development
Navi mumbai developmentNavi mumbai development
Navi mumbai development
 
Sabarmati riverfront case study for development of yamuna riverfront agra
Sabarmati riverfront case study for development of yamuna riverfront agraSabarmati riverfront case study for development of yamuna riverfront agra
Sabarmati riverfront case study for development of yamuna riverfront agra
 
Urban redevelopment
Urban redevelopmentUrban redevelopment
Urban redevelopment
 
46721953 magarpatta-city
46721953 magarpatta-city46721953 magarpatta-city
46721953 magarpatta-city
 
A Slum Redevelopment Project
A Slum Redevelopment ProjectA Slum Redevelopment Project
A Slum Redevelopment Project
 
Bye Laws and City Planning
Bye Laws and City PlanningBye Laws and City Planning
Bye Laws and City Planning
 
CHANDNI CHOWK REDEVELOPMENT
CHANDNI CHOWK REDEVELOPMENTCHANDNI CHOWK REDEVELOPMENT
CHANDNI CHOWK REDEVELOPMENT
 
Chandigarh - planning and its transformation
Chandigarh - planning and its transformation Chandigarh - planning and its transformation
Chandigarh - planning and its transformation
 
Planning Theories presents in the city UJJAIN
Planning Theories presents in the city UJJAINPlanning Theories presents in the city UJJAIN
Planning Theories presents in the city UJJAIN
 
urban studies NASHIK by GB
urban studies NASHIK by GBurban studies NASHIK by GB
urban studies NASHIK by GB
 
Bhubaneswar- Urban Planning
Bhubaneswar- Urban PlanningBhubaneswar- Urban Planning
Bhubaneswar- Urban Planning
 
Urban Villages of Delhi: Case study Kotla Mubarakpur
Urban Villages of Delhi: Case study Kotla MubarakpurUrban Villages of Delhi: Case study Kotla Mubarakpur
Urban Villages of Delhi: Case study Kotla Mubarakpur
 
Neighbourhood planning
Neighbourhood planningNeighbourhood planning
Neighbourhood planning
 
TOD in India
TOD in IndiaTOD in India
TOD in India
 
urban design principles in CBD Belapur, Navi Mumbai
urban design principles in CBD Belapur, Navi Mumbaiurban design principles in CBD Belapur, Navi Mumbai
urban design principles in CBD Belapur, Navi Mumbai
 
Kolkata Metropolitan Development Plan
Kolkata Metropolitan Development PlanKolkata Metropolitan Development Plan
Kolkata Metropolitan Development Plan
 
ZONAL DEVELOPMENT PLAN OF HERITAGE ZONE BHOPAL
ZONAL DEVELOPMENT  PLAN OF  HERITAGE ZONE  BHOPAL ZONAL DEVELOPMENT  PLAN OF  HERITAGE ZONE  BHOPAL
ZONAL DEVELOPMENT PLAN OF HERITAGE ZONE BHOPAL
 
Auroville - City Planning
Auroville - City PlanningAuroville - City Planning
Auroville - City Planning
 
Chandigarh city planning by Le Corbusier
Chandigarh city planning by Le CorbusierChandigarh city planning by Le Corbusier
Chandigarh city planning by Le Corbusier
 

Similar to ZONAL DEVELOPMENT PLAN OF HERITAGE ZONE BHOPAL PPT

Manoj kamat
Manoj kamatManoj kamat
Manoj kamat
mskamat
 
Manoj kamat
Manoj kamatManoj kamat
Manoj kamat
mskamat
 
B033105010
B033105010B033105010
B033105010
inventionjournals
 
Singarayakonda - Analysis
Singarayakonda - AnalysisSingarayakonda - Analysis
Singarayakonda - Analysis
Vasudevan KR
 
Rural housing in india
Rural housing in india Rural housing in india
Rural housing in india
JIT KUMAR GUPTA
 
The Many Faces Of Poverty - Palawan - Volume 2
The Many Faces Of Poverty - Palawan - Volume 2The Many Faces Of Poverty - Palawan - Volume 2
The Many Faces Of Poverty - Palawan - Volume 2
No to mining in Palawan
 
Housing Rural India
Housing Rural India Housing Rural India
Housing Rural India
JIT KUMAR GUPTA
 
Urban-Rural Ratio and Urban & Metropolitan Concentration
Urban-Rural Ratio and Urban & Metropolitan ConcentrationUrban-Rural Ratio and Urban & Metropolitan Concentration
Urban-Rural Ratio and Urban & Metropolitan Concentration
Prasad Thanthratey
 
Why politics and people are at antipodes in india
Why politics and people are at antipodes in indiaWhy politics and people are at antipodes in india
Why politics and people are at antipodes in india
Shantanu Basu
 
The Silent Resurrection of West Bengal
The Silent Resurrection of West BengalThe Silent Resurrection of West Bengal
The Silent Resurrection of West Bengal
Shantanu Basu
 
Slum study_Geography
Slum study_GeographySlum study_Geography
Slum study_Geography
Shaji Johnson
 
29. prem sonwal
29. prem sonwal29. prem sonwal
Socio Economic & Caste Census, 2011, Rural India
Socio Economic & Caste Census, 2011, Rural IndiaSocio Economic & Caste Census, 2011, Rural India
Socio Economic & Caste Census, 2011, Rural India
Shakti Arya
 
Socio economic profile of muslims in maharashtra 9 8-2014 by Vibhuti Patel
Socio economic profile of muslims in maharashtra 9 8-2014 by Vibhuti PatelSocio economic profile of muslims in maharashtra 9 8-2014 by Vibhuti Patel
Socio economic profile of muslims in maharashtra 9 8-2014 by Vibhuti Patel
VIBHUTI PATEL
 
Internal migration and the development nexus,the case of bangladesh
Internal migration and the development nexus,the case of bangladeshInternal migration and the development nexus,the case of bangladesh
Internal migration and the development nexus,the case of bangladesh
Zakiul Alam
 
Rm assignment
Rm assignmentRm assignment
Rm assignment
Pramod Paswan
 
Demography
DemographyDemography
Tharparkar report.
Tharparkar report.Tharparkar report.
Tharparkar report.
Edara-e-Fatima Foundation.
 
Survey report on ultra poor
Survey report on ultra poorSurvey report on ultra poor
Survey report on ultra poor
Diajul Islam
 
Sustainable Development Charsadda_IE Application_Express urself
Sustainable Development Charsadda_IE Application_Express urselfSustainable Development Charsadda_IE Application_Express urself
Sustainable Development Charsadda_IE Application_Express urself
Muhammad Ali
 

Similar to ZONAL DEVELOPMENT PLAN OF HERITAGE ZONE BHOPAL PPT (20)

Manoj kamat
Manoj kamatManoj kamat
Manoj kamat
 
Manoj kamat
Manoj kamatManoj kamat
Manoj kamat
 
B033105010
B033105010B033105010
B033105010
 
Singarayakonda - Analysis
Singarayakonda - AnalysisSingarayakonda - Analysis
Singarayakonda - Analysis
 
Rural housing in india
Rural housing in india Rural housing in india
Rural housing in india
 
The Many Faces Of Poverty - Palawan - Volume 2
The Many Faces Of Poverty - Palawan - Volume 2The Many Faces Of Poverty - Palawan - Volume 2
The Many Faces Of Poverty - Palawan - Volume 2
 
Housing Rural India
Housing Rural India Housing Rural India
Housing Rural India
 
Urban-Rural Ratio and Urban & Metropolitan Concentration
Urban-Rural Ratio and Urban & Metropolitan ConcentrationUrban-Rural Ratio and Urban & Metropolitan Concentration
Urban-Rural Ratio and Urban & Metropolitan Concentration
 
Why politics and people are at antipodes in india
Why politics and people are at antipodes in indiaWhy politics and people are at antipodes in india
Why politics and people are at antipodes in india
 
The Silent Resurrection of West Bengal
The Silent Resurrection of West BengalThe Silent Resurrection of West Bengal
The Silent Resurrection of West Bengal
 
Slum study_Geography
Slum study_GeographySlum study_Geography
Slum study_Geography
 
29. prem sonwal
29. prem sonwal29. prem sonwal
29. prem sonwal
 
Socio Economic & Caste Census, 2011, Rural India
Socio Economic & Caste Census, 2011, Rural IndiaSocio Economic & Caste Census, 2011, Rural India
Socio Economic & Caste Census, 2011, Rural India
 
Socio economic profile of muslims in maharashtra 9 8-2014 by Vibhuti Patel
Socio economic profile of muslims in maharashtra 9 8-2014 by Vibhuti PatelSocio economic profile of muslims in maharashtra 9 8-2014 by Vibhuti Patel
Socio economic profile of muslims in maharashtra 9 8-2014 by Vibhuti Patel
 
Internal migration and the development nexus,the case of bangladesh
Internal migration and the development nexus,the case of bangladeshInternal migration and the development nexus,the case of bangladesh
Internal migration and the development nexus,the case of bangladesh
 
Rm assignment
Rm assignmentRm assignment
Rm assignment
 
Demography
DemographyDemography
Demography
 
Tharparkar report.
Tharparkar report.Tharparkar report.
Tharparkar report.
 
Survey report on ultra poor
Survey report on ultra poorSurvey report on ultra poor
Survey report on ultra poor
 
Sustainable Development Charsadda_IE Application_Express urself
Sustainable Development Charsadda_IE Application_Express urselfSustainable Development Charsadda_IE Application_Express urself
Sustainable Development Charsadda_IE Application_Express urself
 

More from shrikrishna kesharwani

Redesigning of Pochamma Maidan Junction, Warangal
Redesigning of Pochamma Maidan Junction, WarangalRedesigning of Pochamma Maidan Junction, Warangal
Redesigning of Pochamma Maidan Junction, Warangal
shrikrishna kesharwani
 
Innovations in Public Transportation
Innovations in Public TransportationInnovations in Public Transportation
Innovations in Public Transportation
shrikrishna kesharwani
 
Urban Design Project Of Redesigning Prem Pura Ghat
Urban Design Project Of Redesigning Prem Pura Ghat Urban Design Project Of Redesigning Prem Pura Ghat
Urban Design Project Of Redesigning Prem Pura Ghat
shrikrishna kesharwani
 
TRAFFIC SIMULATION AT TOLL ROAD SECTION USING VISSIM SOFTWARE
TRAFFIC SIMULATION AT TOLL ROAD SECTION USING VISSIM SOFTWARETRAFFIC SIMULATION AT TOLL ROAD SECTION USING VISSIM SOFTWARE
TRAFFIC SIMULATION AT TOLL ROAD SECTION USING VISSIM SOFTWARE
shrikrishna kesharwani
 
SUMO simulation CODES AND STEPS
SUMO simulation CODES AND STEPSSUMO simulation CODES AND STEPS
SUMO simulation CODES AND STEPS
shrikrishna kesharwani
 
SUMO ( SIMULATION OF URBAN MOBILITY)
SUMO ( SIMULATION OF URBAN MOBILITY)SUMO ( SIMULATION OF URBAN MOBILITY)
SUMO ( SIMULATION OF URBAN MOBILITY)
shrikrishna kesharwani
 
urban Renewal and Conservation Studio assignment
urban Renewal and Conservation Studio assignment urban Renewal and Conservation Studio assignment
urban Renewal and Conservation Studio assignment
shrikrishna kesharwani
 
PLANNING FOR SELF RELIANT AND SUSTAINABLE CITY IN TERMS OF WATER SUPPLY
PLANNING FOR SELF RELIANT AND SUSTAINABLE CITY IN TERMS OF WATER SUPPLYPLANNING FOR SELF RELIANT AND SUSTAINABLE CITY IN TERMS OF WATER SUPPLY
PLANNING FOR SELF RELIANT AND SUSTAINABLE CITY IN TERMS OF WATER SUPPLY
shrikrishna kesharwani
 
Noise assessment
Noise assessment Noise assessment
Noise assessment
shrikrishna kesharwani
 
SURAT METRO RAIL PROJECT
SURAT METRO RAIL PROJECTSURAT METRO RAIL PROJECT
SURAT METRO RAIL PROJECT
shrikrishna kesharwani
 
Transit Oriented Development.
Transit Oriented Development.Transit Oriented Development.
Transit Oriented Development.
shrikrishna kesharwani
 
SUSTAINABLE TRANSPORTATION: VARIOUS PLOICIES FORMULATED IN INDIA IN REALISING...
SUSTAINABLE TRANSPORTATION: VARIOUS PLOICIES FORMULATED IN INDIA IN REALISING...SUSTAINABLE TRANSPORTATION: VARIOUS PLOICIES FORMULATED IN INDIA IN REALISING...
SUSTAINABLE TRANSPORTATION: VARIOUS PLOICIES FORMULATED IN INDIA IN REALISING...
shrikrishna kesharwani
 
Evaluation of Pedestrian Safety and Road Crossing Behavior at Midblock Crosswalk
Evaluation of Pedestrian Safety and Road Crossing Behavior at Midblock CrosswalkEvaluation of Pedestrian Safety and Road Crossing Behavior at Midblock Crosswalk
Evaluation of Pedestrian Safety and Road Crossing Behavior at Midblock Crosswalk
shrikrishna kesharwani
 
Application of GIS in Transportation Planning
Application of GIS in Transportation Planning Application of GIS in Transportation Planning
Application of GIS in Transportation Planning
shrikrishna kesharwani
 
A CRITICAL REVIEW ON SELECTION OF BINDER FOR PAVING PROJECTS IN INDIA
A CRITICAL REVIEW ON SELECTION OF BINDER FOR PAVING PROJECTS IN INDIAA CRITICAL REVIEW ON SELECTION OF BINDER FOR PAVING PROJECTS IN INDIA
A CRITICAL REVIEW ON SELECTION OF BINDER FOR PAVING PROJECTS IN INDIA
shrikrishna kesharwani
 
Correation, Linear Regression and Multilinear Regression using R software
Correation, Linear Regression and Multilinear Regression using R softwareCorreation, Linear Regression and Multilinear Regression using R software
Correation, Linear Regression and Multilinear Regression using R software
shrikrishna kesharwani
 
SUSTAINABALE TRANSPORTATION
SUSTAINABALE TRANSPORTATIONSUSTAINABALE TRANSPORTATION
SUSTAINABALE TRANSPORTATION
shrikrishna kesharwani
 
Impact of transportation system on environent
Impact of transportation system on environentImpact of transportation system on environent
Impact of transportation system on environent
shrikrishna kesharwani
 
UJJAIN DEVELOPMENT PLAN (Transportation Proposals)
UJJAIN DEVELOPMENT PLAN (Transportation Proposals) UJJAIN DEVELOPMENT PLAN (Transportation Proposals)
UJJAIN DEVELOPMENT PLAN (Transportation Proposals)
shrikrishna kesharwani
 
Special economic zone
Special economic zoneSpecial economic zone
Special economic zone
shrikrishna kesharwani
 

More from shrikrishna kesharwani (20)

Redesigning of Pochamma Maidan Junction, Warangal
Redesigning of Pochamma Maidan Junction, WarangalRedesigning of Pochamma Maidan Junction, Warangal
Redesigning of Pochamma Maidan Junction, Warangal
 
Innovations in Public Transportation
Innovations in Public TransportationInnovations in Public Transportation
Innovations in Public Transportation
 
Urban Design Project Of Redesigning Prem Pura Ghat
Urban Design Project Of Redesigning Prem Pura Ghat Urban Design Project Of Redesigning Prem Pura Ghat
Urban Design Project Of Redesigning Prem Pura Ghat
 
TRAFFIC SIMULATION AT TOLL ROAD SECTION USING VISSIM SOFTWARE
TRAFFIC SIMULATION AT TOLL ROAD SECTION USING VISSIM SOFTWARETRAFFIC SIMULATION AT TOLL ROAD SECTION USING VISSIM SOFTWARE
TRAFFIC SIMULATION AT TOLL ROAD SECTION USING VISSIM SOFTWARE
 
SUMO simulation CODES AND STEPS
SUMO simulation CODES AND STEPSSUMO simulation CODES AND STEPS
SUMO simulation CODES AND STEPS
 
SUMO ( SIMULATION OF URBAN MOBILITY)
SUMO ( SIMULATION OF URBAN MOBILITY)SUMO ( SIMULATION OF URBAN MOBILITY)
SUMO ( SIMULATION OF URBAN MOBILITY)
 
urban Renewal and Conservation Studio assignment
urban Renewal and Conservation Studio assignment urban Renewal and Conservation Studio assignment
urban Renewal and Conservation Studio assignment
 
PLANNING FOR SELF RELIANT AND SUSTAINABLE CITY IN TERMS OF WATER SUPPLY
PLANNING FOR SELF RELIANT AND SUSTAINABLE CITY IN TERMS OF WATER SUPPLYPLANNING FOR SELF RELIANT AND SUSTAINABLE CITY IN TERMS OF WATER SUPPLY
PLANNING FOR SELF RELIANT AND SUSTAINABLE CITY IN TERMS OF WATER SUPPLY
 
Noise assessment
Noise assessment Noise assessment
Noise assessment
 
SURAT METRO RAIL PROJECT
SURAT METRO RAIL PROJECTSURAT METRO RAIL PROJECT
SURAT METRO RAIL PROJECT
 
Transit Oriented Development.
Transit Oriented Development.Transit Oriented Development.
Transit Oriented Development.
 
SUSTAINABLE TRANSPORTATION: VARIOUS PLOICIES FORMULATED IN INDIA IN REALISING...
SUSTAINABLE TRANSPORTATION: VARIOUS PLOICIES FORMULATED IN INDIA IN REALISING...SUSTAINABLE TRANSPORTATION: VARIOUS PLOICIES FORMULATED IN INDIA IN REALISING...
SUSTAINABLE TRANSPORTATION: VARIOUS PLOICIES FORMULATED IN INDIA IN REALISING...
 
Evaluation of Pedestrian Safety and Road Crossing Behavior at Midblock Crosswalk
Evaluation of Pedestrian Safety and Road Crossing Behavior at Midblock CrosswalkEvaluation of Pedestrian Safety and Road Crossing Behavior at Midblock Crosswalk
Evaluation of Pedestrian Safety and Road Crossing Behavior at Midblock Crosswalk
 
Application of GIS in Transportation Planning
Application of GIS in Transportation Planning Application of GIS in Transportation Planning
Application of GIS in Transportation Planning
 
A CRITICAL REVIEW ON SELECTION OF BINDER FOR PAVING PROJECTS IN INDIA
A CRITICAL REVIEW ON SELECTION OF BINDER FOR PAVING PROJECTS IN INDIAA CRITICAL REVIEW ON SELECTION OF BINDER FOR PAVING PROJECTS IN INDIA
A CRITICAL REVIEW ON SELECTION OF BINDER FOR PAVING PROJECTS IN INDIA
 
Correation, Linear Regression and Multilinear Regression using R software
Correation, Linear Regression and Multilinear Regression using R softwareCorreation, Linear Regression and Multilinear Regression using R software
Correation, Linear Regression and Multilinear Regression using R software
 
SUSTAINABALE TRANSPORTATION
SUSTAINABALE TRANSPORTATIONSUSTAINABALE TRANSPORTATION
SUSTAINABALE TRANSPORTATION
 
Impact of transportation system on environent
Impact of transportation system on environentImpact of transportation system on environent
Impact of transportation system on environent
 
UJJAIN DEVELOPMENT PLAN (Transportation Proposals)
UJJAIN DEVELOPMENT PLAN (Transportation Proposals) UJJAIN DEVELOPMENT PLAN (Transportation Proposals)
UJJAIN DEVELOPMENT PLAN (Transportation Proposals)
 
Special economic zone
Special economic zoneSpecial economic zone
Special economic zone
 

Recently uploaded

QCE – Unpacking the syllabus Implications for Senior School practices and ass...
QCE – Unpacking the syllabus Implications for Senior School practices and ass...QCE – Unpacking the syllabus Implications for Senior School practices and ass...
QCE – Unpacking the syllabus Implications for Senior School practices and ass...
mansk2
 
Parkinson Disease & Anti-Parkinsonian Drugs.pptx
Parkinson Disease & Anti-Parkinsonian Drugs.pptxParkinson Disease & Anti-Parkinsonian Drugs.pptx
Parkinson Disease & Anti-Parkinsonian Drugs.pptx
AnujVishwakarma34
 
Dr. Nasir Mustafa CERTIFICATE OF APPRECIATION "NEUROANATOMY"
Dr. Nasir Mustafa CERTIFICATE OF APPRECIATION "NEUROANATOMY"Dr. Nasir Mustafa CERTIFICATE OF APPRECIATION "NEUROANATOMY"
Dr. Nasir Mustafa CERTIFICATE OF APPRECIATION "NEUROANATOMY"
Dr. Nasir Mustafa
 
SD_Integrating 21st Century Skills in Classroom-based Assessment.pptx
SD_Integrating 21st Century Skills in Classroom-based Assessment.pptxSD_Integrating 21st Century Skills in Classroom-based Assessment.pptx
SD_Integrating 21st Century Skills in Classroom-based Assessment.pptx
elwoodprias1
 
Imagination in Computer Science Research
Imagination in Computer Science ResearchImagination in Computer Science Research
Imagination in Computer Science Research
Abhik Roychoudhury
 
PRESS RELEASE - UNIVERSITY OF GHANA, JULY 16, 2024.pdf
PRESS RELEASE - UNIVERSITY OF GHANA, JULY 16, 2024.pdfPRESS RELEASE - UNIVERSITY OF GHANA, JULY 16, 2024.pdf
PRESS RELEASE - UNIVERSITY OF GHANA, JULY 16, 2024.pdf
nservice241
 
Mail Server Configuration Using App passwords in Odoo 17
Mail Server Configuration Using App passwords in Odoo 17Mail Server Configuration Using App passwords in Odoo 17
Mail Server Configuration Using App passwords in Odoo 17
Celine George
 
Genetics Teaching Plan: Dr.Kshirsagar R.V.
Genetics Teaching Plan: Dr.Kshirsagar R.V.Genetics Teaching Plan: Dr.Kshirsagar R.V.
Genetics Teaching Plan: Dr.Kshirsagar R.V.
DrRavindrakshirsagar1
 
Lange and Roberts "DEIA in the Scholarly Landscape Session 5: DEIA in Peer Re...
Lange and Roberts "DEIA in the Scholarly Landscape Session 5: DEIA in Peer Re...Lange and Roberts "DEIA in the Scholarly Landscape Session 5: DEIA in Peer Re...
Lange and Roberts "DEIA in the Scholarly Landscape Session 5: DEIA in Peer Re...
National Information Standards Organization (NISO)
 
Lecture Notes Unit4 Chapter13 users , roles and privileges
Lecture Notes Unit4 Chapter13 users , roles and privilegesLecture Notes Unit4 Chapter13 users , roles and privileges
Lecture Notes Unit4 Chapter13 users , roles and privileges
Murugan146644
 
Node JS Interview Question PDF By ScholarHat
Node JS Interview Question PDF By ScholarHatNode JS Interview Question PDF By ScholarHat
Node JS Interview Question PDF By ScholarHat
Scholarhat
 
View Inheritance in Odoo 17 - Odoo 17 Slides
View Inheritance in Odoo 17 - Odoo 17  SlidesView Inheritance in Odoo 17 - Odoo 17  Slides
View Inheritance in Odoo 17 - Odoo 17 Slides
Celine George
 
How to Manage Access Rights & User Types in Odoo 17
How to Manage Access Rights & User Types in Odoo 17How to Manage Access Rights & User Types in Odoo 17
How to Manage Access Rights & User Types in Odoo 17
Celine George
 
ASP.NET Core Interview Questions PDF By ScholarHat.pdf
ASP.NET Core Interview Questions PDF By ScholarHat.pdfASP.NET Core Interview Questions PDF By ScholarHat.pdf
ASP.NET Core Interview Questions PDF By ScholarHat.pdf
Scholarhat
 
How to Empty a One2Many Field in Odoo 17
How to Empty a One2Many Field in Odoo 17How to Empty a One2Many Field in Odoo 17
How to Empty a One2Many Field in Odoo 17
Celine George
 
How To Sell Hamster Kombat Coin In Pre-market
How To Sell Hamster Kombat Coin In Pre-marketHow To Sell Hamster Kombat Coin In Pre-market
How To Sell Hamster Kombat Coin In Pre-market
Sikandar Ali
 
Introduction to Google Productivity Tools for Office and Personal Use
Introduction to Google Productivity Tools for Office and Personal UseIntroduction to Google Productivity Tools for Office and Personal Use
Introduction to Google Productivity Tools for Office and Personal Use
Excellence Foundation for South Sudan
 
BÀI TẬP BỔ TRỢ 4 KỸ NĂNG TIẾNG ANH LỚP 12 - GLOBAL SUCCESS - FORM MỚI 2025 - ...
BÀI TẬP BỔ TRỢ 4 KỸ NĂNG TIẾNG ANH LỚP 12 - GLOBAL SUCCESS - FORM MỚI 2025 - ...BÀI TẬP BỔ TRỢ 4 KỸ NĂNG TIẾNG ANH LỚP 12 - GLOBAL SUCCESS - FORM MỚI 2025 - ...
BÀI TẬP BỔ TRỢ 4 KỸ NĂNG TIẾNG ANH LỚP 12 - GLOBAL SUCCESS - FORM MỚI 2025 - ...
Nguyen Thanh Tu Collection
 
A beginner’s guide to project reviews - everything you wanted to know but wer...
A beginner’s guide to project reviews - everything you wanted to know but wer...A beginner’s guide to project reviews - everything you wanted to know but wer...
A beginner’s guide to project reviews - everything you wanted to know but wer...
Association for Project Management
 
BỘ ĐỀ THI HỌC SINH GIỎI CÁC TỈNH MÔN TIẾNG ANH LỚP 9 NĂM HỌC 2023-2024 (CÓ FI...
BỘ ĐỀ THI HỌC SINH GIỎI CÁC TỈNH MÔN TIẾNG ANH LỚP 9 NĂM HỌC 2023-2024 (CÓ FI...BỘ ĐỀ THI HỌC SINH GIỎI CÁC TỈNH MÔN TIẾNG ANH LỚP 9 NĂM HỌC 2023-2024 (CÓ FI...
BỘ ĐỀ THI HỌC SINH GIỎI CÁC TỈNH MÔN TIẾNG ANH LỚP 9 NĂM HỌC 2023-2024 (CÓ FI...
Nguyen Thanh Tu Collection
 

Recently uploaded (20)

QCE – Unpacking the syllabus Implications for Senior School practices and ass...
QCE – Unpacking the syllabus Implications for Senior School practices and ass...QCE – Unpacking the syllabus Implications for Senior School practices and ass...
QCE – Unpacking the syllabus Implications for Senior School practices and ass...
 
Parkinson Disease & Anti-Parkinsonian Drugs.pptx
Parkinson Disease & Anti-Parkinsonian Drugs.pptxParkinson Disease & Anti-Parkinsonian Drugs.pptx
Parkinson Disease & Anti-Parkinsonian Drugs.pptx
 
Dr. Nasir Mustafa CERTIFICATE OF APPRECIATION "NEUROANATOMY"
Dr. Nasir Mustafa CERTIFICATE OF APPRECIATION "NEUROANATOMY"Dr. Nasir Mustafa CERTIFICATE OF APPRECIATION "NEUROANATOMY"
Dr. Nasir Mustafa CERTIFICATE OF APPRECIATION "NEUROANATOMY"
 
SD_Integrating 21st Century Skills in Classroom-based Assessment.pptx
SD_Integrating 21st Century Skills in Classroom-based Assessment.pptxSD_Integrating 21st Century Skills in Classroom-based Assessment.pptx
SD_Integrating 21st Century Skills in Classroom-based Assessment.pptx
 
Imagination in Computer Science Research
Imagination in Computer Science ResearchImagination in Computer Science Research
Imagination in Computer Science Research
 
PRESS RELEASE - UNIVERSITY OF GHANA, JULY 16, 2024.pdf
PRESS RELEASE - UNIVERSITY OF GHANA, JULY 16, 2024.pdfPRESS RELEASE - UNIVERSITY OF GHANA, JULY 16, 2024.pdf
PRESS RELEASE - UNIVERSITY OF GHANA, JULY 16, 2024.pdf
 
Mail Server Configuration Using App passwords in Odoo 17
Mail Server Configuration Using App passwords in Odoo 17Mail Server Configuration Using App passwords in Odoo 17
Mail Server Configuration Using App passwords in Odoo 17
 
Genetics Teaching Plan: Dr.Kshirsagar R.V.
Genetics Teaching Plan: Dr.Kshirsagar R.V.Genetics Teaching Plan: Dr.Kshirsagar R.V.
Genetics Teaching Plan: Dr.Kshirsagar R.V.
 
Lange and Roberts "DEIA in the Scholarly Landscape Session 5: DEIA in Peer Re...
Lange and Roberts "DEIA in the Scholarly Landscape Session 5: DEIA in Peer Re...Lange and Roberts "DEIA in the Scholarly Landscape Session 5: DEIA in Peer Re...
Lange and Roberts "DEIA in the Scholarly Landscape Session 5: DEIA in Peer Re...
 
Lecture Notes Unit4 Chapter13 users , roles and privileges
Lecture Notes Unit4 Chapter13 users , roles and privilegesLecture Notes Unit4 Chapter13 users , roles and privileges
Lecture Notes Unit4 Chapter13 users , roles and privileges
 
Node JS Interview Question PDF By ScholarHat
Node JS Interview Question PDF By ScholarHatNode JS Interview Question PDF By ScholarHat
Node JS Interview Question PDF By ScholarHat
 
View Inheritance in Odoo 17 - Odoo 17 Slides
View Inheritance in Odoo 17 - Odoo 17  SlidesView Inheritance in Odoo 17 - Odoo 17  Slides
View Inheritance in Odoo 17 - Odoo 17 Slides
 
How to Manage Access Rights & User Types in Odoo 17
How to Manage Access Rights & User Types in Odoo 17How to Manage Access Rights & User Types in Odoo 17
How to Manage Access Rights & User Types in Odoo 17
 
ASP.NET Core Interview Questions PDF By ScholarHat.pdf
ASP.NET Core Interview Questions PDF By ScholarHat.pdfASP.NET Core Interview Questions PDF By ScholarHat.pdf
ASP.NET Core Interview Questions PDF By ScholarHat.pdf
 
How to Empty a One2Many Field in Odoo 17
How to Empty a One2Many Field in Odoo 17How to Empty a One2Many Field in Odoo 17
How to Empty a One2Many Field in Odoo 17
 
How To Sell Hamster Kombat Coin In Pre-market
How To Sell Hamster Kombat Coin In Pre-marketHow To Sell Hamster Kombat Coin In Pre-market
How To Sell Hamster Kombat Coin In Pre-market
 
Introduction to Google Productivity Tools for Office and Personal Use
Introduction to Google Productivity Tools for Office and Personal UseIntroduction to Google Productivity Tools for Office and Personal Use
Introduction to Google Productivity Tools for Office and Personal Use
 
BÀI TẬP BỔ TRỢ 4 KỸ NĂNG TIẾNG ANH LỚP 12 - GLOBAL SUCCESS - FORM MỚI 2025 - ...
BÀI TẬP BỔ TRỢ 4 KỸ NĂNG TIẾNG ANH LỚP 12 - GLOBAL SUCCESS - FORM MỚI 2025 - ...BÀI TẬP BỔ TRỢ 4 KỸ NĂNG TIẾNG ANH LỚP 12 - GLOBAL SUCCESS - FORM MỚI 2025 - ...
BÀI TẬP BỔ TRỢ 4 KỸ NĂNG TIẾNG ANH LỚP 12 - GLOBAL SUCCESS - FORM MỚI 2025 - ...
 
A beginner’s guide to project reviews - everything you wanted to know but wer...
A beginner’s guide to project reviews - everything you wanted to know but wer...A beginner’s guide to project reviews - everything you wanted to know but wer...
A beginner’s guide to project reviews - everything you wanted to know but wer...
 
BỘ ĐỀ THI HỌC SINH GIỎI CÁC TỈNH MÔN TIẾNG ANH LỚP 9 NĂM HỌC 2023-2024 (CÓ FI...
BỘ ĐỀ THI HỌC SINH GIỎI CÁC TỈNH MÔN TIẾNG ANH LỚP 9 NĂM HỌC 2023-2024 (CÓ FI...BỘ ĐỀ THI HỌC SINH GIỎI CÁC TỈNH MÔN TIẾNG ANH LỚP 9 NĂM HỌC 2023-2024 (CÓ FI...
BỘ ĐỀ THI HỌC SINH GIỎI CÁC TỈNH MÔN TIẾNG ANH LỚP 9 NĂM HỌC 2023-2024 (CÓ FI...
 

ZONAL DEVELOPMENT PLAN OF HERITAGE ZONE BHOPAL PPT

  • 1. GROUP MEMBERS Harshit Verma 181109002 Harshita Bamne 181109004 Shrikrishna 181109005 Minhaj Qureshi 181109009 Vedankur Kedar 181109011 Jhalak Agrawal 181109013 Umang Patel 181109015 Sai Teja 181109017 Shanmukh Praveen 181109020 Shefna S. 181109022 Tanmay Shende 181109025 Keerthan Chandra 181109027 Sushil Barkhania 181109029 J. Justin Andrews 181109030 Moulishree Khakhre 181109032 Pavan Sashidhar 181109033 Abhishek RS 181109041 Shravani Reddy 181109042
  • 2. 2 CONTENTS MAPS DEMOGRAPHIC DETAILS CONCEPTUAL FRAMEWORK PHYSICAL AND GEOLOGICAL CHARECTERSTICS INFRASTRUCTURE DETAILS ENVIRONMENTAL DETAILS TRAFFIC DETAILS CORE CITY AREA CHARECTERSTICS HERITAGE SITES OF BHOPAL PROPOSALS
  • 5. Source- GIS 5 L A N D U S E M A P LANDUSE Area (Ha.) Land use % Residential 124.46 46.93827 Commercial 79.85 30.11539 Recreational 10.5 3.99 PSP 17.4 6.58 Water body 10.8 4.07 Transportatio n 20.3 7.65 Other 1.68 0.65 Total area 264.99 100
  • 6. Source- CDP 2005, Google Earth 6 SLUM LOCATION MAP S.NO SLUM NAME WARD NO. 1 Baag Munshi Khan 09 2 Chouki Emam Bada Harijan Basti (Amar Basti 21 3 Islam Pura 23 4 Bhagwan Shahay Marg 23 5 Bhoi Pura 23 HERITAGE ZONE
  • 7. Source- https://censusindia.gov.in/2011census/population_enumeration.html 7 PRIMARY CENSUS DATA  Bhopal Heritage zone is the composition of 2, 3, 4 and 5 zones of city where the entire zones are not considered but several wards from each zone are comprised a total of 7 wards 8,9,19, 20, 21, 22 and 23. The zones 2 and 5 are having the maximum population proportion of the heritage zone. WARDS Total households Total population Male population Female population WARD NO.-8 6098 28392 14399 13993 WARD NO.-9 5622 28020 14267 13753 WARD NO.-19 3276 16417 8450 7967 WARD NO.-20 4498 21320 10870 10450 WARD NO.-21 4644 24515 12631 11884 WARD NO.-22 4044 17994 9174 8820 WARD NO.-23 3675 17094 8898 8196 TOTAL 31857 153752 78689 75063 HOUSEHOLDS & POPULATION DATA:
  • 8. Source- https://censusindia.gov.in/2011census/population_enumeration.html 8 153752 78689 75063 0 20000 40000 60000 80000 100000 120000 140000 160000 180000 Total population Male population Female population Heritage zone population composition Ward wise population with gender segregation:  As the Heritage zone is taken as the ward wise composition. The data is also analyzed as per the ward data. The combined data of stats shows that the total number of households is 31,857. The total population of the zone is 1,53,752 comprising of 78,689 male and 75,063 females.  The number of households in wards 8 and 9 are larger in number with the maximum population over 28000. Whereas ward 21 has 4644 households and the population of 24515 indicates that the minimum number of households comprise the large number of population.  According to the census 2011 sex ratio of the zone is 954, which is actually a progressive female ratio when compared to the Bhopal city sex ratio of 921.
  • 9. Source- https://censusindia.gov.in/2011census/population_enumeration.html 9 Literacy data of zone :  The heritage zone literacy rate is around 72%. Whereas, the Bhopal metropolitan area has 85% of literacy. Gender wise literacy share is as, maximum percentage is towards male with 53% and female are only 47%. The decline in the literacy rate of heritage zone is because the wards 8, 9, 21, 22 & 23 are having the maximum number of illiterates with almost one third of their population. 72% 28% Literates v/s Illiterates Total literates Total illiterates 53% 47% Literacy rate composition Male literates Female literates WardsData Total Literates Total Illiterates w.no-8 20465 7927 w.no-9 18473 9547 w.no-19 13515 2902 w.no-20 16994 4326 w.no-21 16425 8090 w.no-22 13199 4795 w.no-23 12198 4896 TOTAL 111269 42483
  • 10. Source- https://censusindia.gov.in/2011census/population_enumeration.html 10 Employment data of zone : 35% 65% Employment percentage Total Working Population Non Working Population WardsData Total Working Population Total Male workers Total Female workers Total Non-Working Population w.no-8 10635 7722 2913 17757 w.no-9 10720 7717 3003 17300 w.no-19 5650 4584 1066 10767 w.no-20 6654 5545 1109 14666 w.no-21 7571 6362 1209 16944 w.no-22 6171 4861 1310 11823 w.no-23 6033 4510 1523 11061 TOTAL 53434 41301 12133 100318 77% 23% Male workers v/s Female workers Total male workers Total female workers  The heritage zone employment percentage is just 35%. This decline is because of the more number of marginal workers than main workers during the period of data enumeration. At an average 2 persons are working from every household. Almost 2/3rd or more of every ward population are under non-working. Out of total 35% of workers, 77% are males and 23% are female workers.
  • 11. Source- https://censusindia.gov.in/2011census/population_enumeration.html 11 PHYSICAL INFRASTRUCTURE Household sizes in the zone: 0 5 10 15 20 25 30 1 2 3 4 5 6-8 9+ % of households Household size composition % Household sizes 1 2 3 4 5 6-8 9+ 3.3% 8.08% 13.97% 23.04% 20.57% 25.4% 5.64% Average household size of India according to the 2011 census is 4.45.The average household size of the Bhopal city is 4.7. Average household size of the Heritage zone is the average of the wards individual sizes i.e., 4.82. Ward Household size 0008 4.65 0009 4.98 0019 5.01 0020 4.73 0021 5.27 0022 4.44 0023 4.65 Average 4.82 As the household size increases the level of congestion also increases. By this understanding, heritage zone has the maximum congestion in wards 19 and 21. Holistically data shows that more than 50% of households are having more than or equal to 5 people residing in the entire zone.
  • 12. Source- https://censusindia.gov.in/2011census/HLO/HL_PCA/Houselisting-housing-HLPCA.html 12 Good Livable Dilapidated 63.94 33.3 2.75 Total % of households with built-up condition 0 20 40 60 80 100 Total Good Livable Dilapidated Residential households condition Total Good Livable Dilapidated 98.25 62.89 32.65 2.74  According to census the criteria to categorize existing condition of all the buildings in the zone are given under three heads: Dilapidated, Livable and Good condition. Out of which 64% of buildings are in good condition, 33% of the buildings are just in livable conditions and 3% are dilapidated. Out of the total 98.25% of existing residential blocks 63% are in good 32.65% are livable and 2.74% are dilapidated in condition.  The wards 8, 9, 22 and 23 are having lesser no. of good condition households around or less than 50%. That’s why there is the gradual increase in % of livable and dilapidated households with the decrease of good households in the context of total households.  In the total 98.25 % of residential households also the same 8,9,22 and 23 wards are having lesser number of good households.  Wards 19 & 20 are having more number of households in good condition. Simultaneously resulting in less number of dilapidated and just livable households. Typology of the buildings:
  • 13. Source- https://censusindia.gov.in/2011census/HLO/HL_PCA/Houselisting-housing-HLPCA.html 13 Main Source of Drinking Water Tap water from treated source Tap water from un- treated source Covered well Un- covered well Hand pump Tube well/ Borehole Spring River/ Canal Tank/ Pond/ Lake Other sources 84.67 7.6 0.2 0.1 0.34 4.94 0.16 0.07 1.35 0.54 Water sources availability and proximity of sources: Within premises Near premises Away 59% 32.50% 8.50% Location of drinking water source ***The data is expressed in terms of total % of households using the various sources of water. Location of the drinking water source is the proximity from the households to sources.  The main sources of drinking water is maximum treated tap water. Also untreated tap water is utilised by less than or around 10% households in every ward. But some wards depend on different sources like in ward no.8, 7% households depend on tank/lake. 13, 7, 13% of households in 9,19 and 21 wards depend on tube/bore wells.  The major problem of away sources is mostly prevailing in wards 8,9. Ward 20 has the sources with maximum no. of households in premises. Where, the remaining wards are having the percentages of households close to average values in the graph.
  • 14. Source- https://censusindia.gov.in/2011census/HLO/HL_PCA/Houselisting-housing-HLPCA.html 14 Sewerage and Sanitation facilities: Closed drainage Open drainage No drainage 58.8 38.5 2.7 Household waste water connection 89% 11% Households having sanitation facilities Number of Households having latrine facility within premises Number of Households not having latrine facility within premises o Only 76% of households in the wards 19 and 20 are connected to the closed drainage system and in rest of wards only around 50 % of the households are in closed connection to sewerage system. o The wards 9,21,22 and 23 are much worse in the case of sewerage connectivity with more than 50% of households are connected to open drainage system, whereas wards 19 and 20 are better with less number of households connecting open drainage. The only ward no.8 with the 11% of households are not at all connected to any sewerage system. o Out of 11% of households not having sanitation facilities, the wards 22 and 23 are having lesser latrines and the ward no.8 is least in terms of sanitary facilities to the households with only 62% of households having sanitation facilities.
  • 18. Chhawani Hill Ridge. Baghsewania , Laharpur, Amarawad Khurd Ridge Idgah Hill Ridge. Shamla Hill Ridge Arera Hill Ridge. Char Imli Hill Ridge Singar Choli Hill Ridge. Hill configuration around the Kaliasote and the Kerwa Singhpur Sewania Gond Hill Ridge. Sewania Gond Hill Ridge. Prempura- Dharampuri Hill Ridge. Source- City Development Plan, Bhopal under JNNURM 18 PHYSICAL AND GEOGRAPHICAL CHARACTER 14 water bodies including the two large lakes Upper and Lower lake in the east. Slopes towards north Slopes towards southeast general ground level: 460m- 500 m. Hillocks range from the Singacholi (625m) up to the Vindhyachal range immense possibilities for landscaping and water front Development for recreation. Hills and lakes creates physical barriers and makes interlinks inconvenient and circuitous. T.T. Nagar and its are separated by the old city by Upper Lake and Lower Lake. BHEL Township is separated from the new town as well as the old city by the railway.
  • 19. Source- City Development Plan, Bhopal under JNNURM 19 INFRASTRUCTURE EXISTING SEWAGE SYSTEM  The lakes are occupied by the human settlements and receiving untreated/raw sewage through no. of sewage fed drains  The anthropogenic pressure and inflow of raw sewage in these lakes have made the lake water quality to highly deteriorated condition.  Scheme: Prevention of Pollution Of Upper Lake  SEWER NETWORK: length- 23.5 km; diameters- 150mm to 1200mm. 30 years old  The Upper and Lower lakes are together called as the Bhoj Wetland.  Upper Lake (11th century)  catchments area: 361 sq km  waterspread area: 31 sq km.  Lower Lake (late 18th century)  catchments area: 9.60 sq km  water-spread: 1.29 sq km. Motia Tank Siddiqui Hussain & Munsi Hussian Shahpura Lake lower lake Upper Lake Kaliyasut Reservoir Halali dam catchments (patra nala) Char Imli Pond Landiya Talab etc.
  • 20. Source- City Development Plan, Bhopal under JNNURM 20 INFRASTRUCTURE STORM WATER DRAINAGE Provided mainly by Patra nallah which receives flow from number of small channels running across the city, like: Gaji Khan ka nallah Ashoka Garden nallah Maholi ka nallah Jinsi nallah mahamai Bagh ka nallah kale Bhairon ka nallah  After Patra nallah, discharged into the Islamnagar river 18 km from Bhopal, which finally flows in to the Halali river.  Large portion of the city in the central region discharges storm runoff to Upper Lake and Lower lake.  The entire network of Patra nallah is 50 kms
  • 21. Source- City Development Plan, Bhopal under JNNURM 21 ENVIRONMENT WATER POLLUTION  Environmental Problems associated with the different water resources: • Ground Water Contamination • Chemical pollution • Microbial Contamination • Affecting Human Health due to Waterborne Diseases  Historical pond of Siddiqui Hussain has become abandoned due to siltation and excessive growth of terrestrial and aquatic plants and illegally refilled for construction of residential houses. AIR POLLUTION  Highest traffic density near Bharat Talkies so as the pollution level.  The four hourly average SPM levels during 9-12 hours, 13-17 hours and 17-21 hours were 2200, 2045 and 2086 ug/cum, respectively.  Constant monitoring of emission from vehicles and penal action against polluting vehicles required.
  • 22. Source- City Development Plan, Bhopal under JNNURM 22 ENVIRONMENT NAME OF WATER BODY SPREAD AREA (IN HA) PRESENT USE ECOLOGICAL STATUS Upper lake 3100 Water supply And recreation Mesotrophic and part of the lake is Eutrophic Lower lake 129 Raw water Supply recreation Advance stage of Eutrophic Motia Tank 1.89 Recreation Advance stage of Eutrophic Siddiqui Hussain Tank 1.0 Recreation Bog lake Munshi Hussain Khan Tank 1.2 Recreation Eutrophic Lendiya Pond 1.5 Recreation Advance stage of Eutrophic Char Imli Pond 1.2 Recreation Eutrophic SURFACE WATER BODIES IN THE ZONE
  • 23. Source- City Development Plan, Bhopal under JNNURM Bhopal Talkies Intersection. • High traffic intensity • Heavy vehicle turning movements • No Channelization, inappropriately designed traffic islands • Unsafe turning of vehicles at the intersection • No pedestrian facilities for safe crossing at intersection TRAFFIC • Average traffic volume around bus stand: 80,000 PCU to 85,000 PCU along Hamidia road and Aishbagh Road. • The presence of Bhopal railway station and bus stand in the area adds more problems. • Absence of functional hierarchy of road network. • Inter-mixing of local traffic with long distance traffic from Sagar road, Obedullaganj road etc. • Overloading of some of the major roads like Hamidia Road joining bus stand to railway station, Lalghati to royal market to Kamla park Road, chhola road etc. Bus stand Chauraha • Unorganised entry and exit to Bus terminal (private). • No facilities for pedestrians and IPT (Auto Rickshaw). • High intensity of traffic Royal market Intersection • High intensity of traffic (over 1500 PCU in peak hour) • Considerable heavy vehicle movement, no matching geometrics • Available ROW restricted due to encroachments • Inappropriate signal phasing • No pedestrian facilities. Very limited scope of road widening Very high volume of traffic Heterogeneous traffic mix High degree of pedestrian movement On street parking INTERSECTIONS 23
  • 24. Source- City Development Plan, Bhopal under JNNURM 24 CORE CITY AREA SR.NO. Name of Corridor / Road Existing Carriage way Existing ROW 1 Kamla Park - Polytechnic 4L/F/NCW 20 2 Alpana Tiraha - Hamidia Rd Junctions Fly - Over 4L/F/NCW 21 Nos 1 Nos 30 3 Nadra Bus Stand 0.60 Kms EXISTING CARRIAGE WAY AND ROW (Source; Integrated Urban Development in Madhya Pradesh, Bhopal ADB) Parking intensity at Bus stand is alarming Main inter city bus terminal- Nadra Bus Terminal Terminal witness high-density land use, primarily commercial and PSP Use of roads by regional buses further congests the roads which have little scope of widening. High volume of local traffic Nadra Bus Terminal has a total area of 3,758 Sq m  The core has maximum population pressure, maximum intensity of building and movement of traffic and services. The old CBD has gradually expanded its activities.  Uniform skyline and forms an introvert residential neighbourhood.  Mixed land use i.e. commercial over residential.  The central market is a vibrant area with the road around C.B.D. areas carrying palette of people. It is the multi functional regional market catering to the wider area than just the city.
  • 26. Taj-ul-Masajid History The construction work of this mosque started in the reign of the Mughal Emperor Bahadur Shah Zafar by Nawab Shah Jahan Begum (1844–1860 and 1868–1901) of Bhopal (Wife of Nawab Syed Siddiq Hasan Khan) and continued to be built by her daughter Sultan Jahan Begum, till her lifetime. The mosque was not completed due to lack of funds, and after a long lay-off after the War of 1857, construction was resumed in 1971 by Allama Mohammad Imran Khan Nadwi Azhari and Maulana Sayed Hashmat Ali Sahab of Bhopal. The construction was completed by 1985 and the entrance (eastern) gate was renovated grandly using ancient motifs from circa 1250 Syrian mosques by the contribution of the Emir of Kuwait to commemorate the memory of his departed wife.
  • 27. 27 Architecture And Annual Congregation Architecture The mosque has a pink facade topped by two 18-storey high octagonal minarets with marble domes, an impressive main hallway with attractive pillars and marble flooring resembling Mughal architecture the likes of Jama Masjid in Delhi and the huge Badshahi Mosque of Lahore. It has a courtyard with a large tank in the centre. It has a double-storeyed gateway with four recessed archways and nine cusped multifold openings in the main prayer hall. The massive pillars in the hall hold 27 ceilings through squinted arches of which 16 ceilings are decorated with ornate petaled designs. Annual Congregation Aalmi Tablighi Ijtima is an annual three-day congregation that draws people from all over the world. It was held at Taj-ul- Masajid until it was shifted to Islam Nagar outside the city due to shortage of space.
  • 28. 28 History Kamalapati Palace lies on the eastern side of the ancient embankment known as Bhojpal, built by the Parmara King Bhoj (AD 1010-1055) from which the present name Bhopal is derived. The existing structure is a part of the palace which was constructed by Rani Kamlapati, the widow of Nizam Shah, General Chief of Ginnogarh in AD 1722. On the Western side of this palace are the remains of Fatehgarh Fort on the hill which was built by Sardar Dost Mohammad of Bhopal (AD 1708-1726) who laid the foundation of modern Bhopal. Kamlapati palace is an example of contemporary secular architecture of the early eighteenth century and the earliest extant example in the Bhopal Town. This double storied building is constructed of lakhauri bricks having a facade with cusped arches supported on the fluted pillars, merlons having the shape of lotus petals and brackets supporting the Chhajjas.This monument was declared protected by the Government of India in 1989 and since then Archaeological Survey of India remains the custodian. Kamalapati Palace Source- Internet
  • 29. Source- Internet 29 Moti Masjid is one of the many mosques located in Bhopal, Madhya Pradesh. Even though the mosque is relatively smaller in size as compared to the other exquisite and historical monuments that stand majestically in the 'city of mosques', the Moti Masjid is of equal importance. This famous historic landmark was built by Sikander Jehan Begum of Bhopal, daughter of Qudusiya Begum, in the year 1860. Sikander Begum was an unconventional woman who abolished slavery and set up the trend of the progressive woman in the entire city. Popularly known as the Pearl Mosque, the mosque is located in the heart of the city and represents the rich history of the Bhopal Begums in India. The architecture of the Moti Masjid in Bhopal has a striking resemblance to the architecture of the Jama Masjid in Delhi, except for the size. The Moti Masjid features a white marble facade with two small cupolas on the top. The two dark red towers on either side of the primary structure of the mosque are equally beautiful and fascinating. Moti Masjid
  • 30. 30 The Shaukat Mahal was constructed in the 1830s as a wedding gift for Sikander Jahan Begum, the first female ruler of Bhopal. Architecturally it is a bit of an oddity compared to other buildings in the heart of Bhopal, the building has many western elements combining both gothic and islamic themes. This is due to the design being attributed to the Bourbons of Bhopal, widely considered to be descendants of renowned French kings. Up until 2015 the building was in a terrible state with ceilings collapsed and wide cracks appearing on the majestic facade and interior walls. Despite this the building still housed 21 families, but their safety became a concern as the Mahal continued to decay. This all sounds very familiar, a situation that the Taj Mahal Palace in Bhopal has also experienced. But all is not lost, as with the Taj Mahal Palace there are plans in place to renovate the building, and here they have already made an excellent start to that process. Shaukat Mahal Source- Internet
  • 31. 31 The Taj Mahal at Bhopal was built as the Begum's residence, at a cost of ₹ 3,000,000. Its construction spanned over a period of 13 years, from 1871 to 1884. It was one of the largest palaces of the world built at that time. The building was originally named Raj Mahal ("royal palace"). The British Resident at Bhopal, highly impressed with the architecture, suggested that the palace be renamed the Taj Mahal, the Taj Mahal at Agra having been built by the Begum's namesake Shah Jahan. The begum accepted the suggestion and the palace was renamed to Taj Mahal. The Begum is said to have ordered a three- year-long celebration called Jashn-e-Taj Mahal after the completion of the building. Taj Mahal Palace Source- Internet
  • 32. 32 Architecture The architecture of Taj Mahal has British, French, Mughal, Arabic and Hindu influences. T he palace contains 120 rooms, a hall of mirrors or sheesh mahal and the savon bhadon pavilion, an elaborate fountain like structure that simulated the effect of rain. The main entrance is a seven-storied structure. The palace was part of a complex of buildings along the three lakes that includes the Benazir Palace, which was the begum's summer palace, and the Taj-ul-Masjid Mosque. The palace has been built in the Indo-Saracenic style and is kept cool by the winds blowing in from the lakes. Source- Internet
  • 33. 33 Golghar Museum is a museum in Bhopal, India. It showcases a variety of arts, handicraft and social life from the Nawab-era. The museum was inaugurated in April 2013 by Culture Minister Laxmikant Sharma. Golghar Museum Source- Internet
  • 35. Source- Urban Mobility India and Draft Bhopal Development Plan 2031 35 PARKING • Parking is an essential component of the transportation system. • Affects the ease of reaching destinations and therefore affects overall accessibility. • One of the key links between transport network and land-use • Problems can be often defined either in terms of supply (too few spaces are available, somebody must build more) or in terms of management (available facilities are used inefficiently and should be better managed). • Specific Parking Management for the core city zone shall be prepared to support development regulations for the walled city SCENARIO OF INDIAN STREET IN CORE CITY AREA
  • 38. Source- Urban Mobility India & MP town and country planning 38 EXISTING SCENARIO • The grid iron planning is around 400 years old, still famous as commercial hub but was Old city Area design for pedestrian movement. • The core area is having commercial land use. • The streets are 1 lane with their width varying between 22 to 3.5 m. COMMERCIAL CITY CENTRE GENERAL COMMERCIAL CENTRE EDUCATION HEALTH ADMINISTRATIVE RECREATIONAL FOREST RECREATIONAL CITY PARK RECREATIONAL PLAY FIELD STADIUM RESIDENTIAL WATERBODY
  • 39. 39 AIMS AND OBJECTIVES • To provide a congestion free roads so as to increase mobility and accessibility. • To encourage non-motorised means of transportation for social and environmental improvement. • To reduce dependence on the car. • To ensure that car parking provision and enforcement are broadly self-financing.
  • 40. Source- Urban Mobility India 40 DEMAND FOR PARKING
  • 41. Source- Urban Mobility India 41 DEMAND FOR PARKING-ON STREET (WEEKDAY) • Highest parking accumulation is observed on street 15 i.e. 37.5 followed by 30 at street 6. There is no significant variation in terms of duration of parking • The average turnover in study area is 3.93. ACCUMULAT ION SUPPLY (L/2.5) OCCUPANCY / PARKING INDEX LOAD FOR 6 HRS. (VEH. HR) PARKING VOLUME (VEH/DAY) TURNOVER FOR 6HR. PARKING DURATION (MINS) Street 1 24.5 30 81.67 147 133.75 4.46 65.94 Street 2 25.5 30 85 153 69.75 2.33 131.61 Street 5 8.5 30 28.33 51 43.25 1.44 70.75 Street 4 8.75 30 29.17 52.5 24 0.80 131.61 Street 5 11.5 30 38.33 69 52 1.73 79.62 Street 6 30 30 100 180 266.75 8.89 40.49 Street 7 26 30 86.67 156 135.5 4.52 69.08 Street 8 25.5 30 85 153 149.25 4.98 61.51 Street 9 12.25 30 40.83 73.5 133 4.43 33.16 Street 10 12.5 30 41.67 75 107.5 3.58 41.86 Street 11 18.25 30 60.83 109.5 108.75 3.63 60.41 Street 12 26 30 86.67 156 92.25 3.08 101.46 Street 13 13 30 43.33 78 51.5 1.72 90.87 Street 14 16 30 53.33 96 54.75 1.83 105.21 Street 15 37.5 30 125 225 291.75 9.73 46.27 Street 16 27.75 30 92.5 166.5 187.75 6.26 53.21 Street17 21 30 70 126 95.5 3.18 79.16 Street 18 21 30 70 126 116 3.87 65.17 Street 19 18.75 30 62 112.5 176.75 5.89 38.19 Street 20 14.25 30 47.5 85.5 69.5 2.32 73.81
  • 42. Source- Urban Mobility India 42 DEMAND FOR PARKING-ON STREET (WEEKEND) • Highest parking accumulation is observed on street 11 followed by street 13. Longer Duration commuter i.e. Shopkeepers are found more. • The average turnover in study area is 2.75. ACCUMULATIO N SUPPLY (L/2.5) OCCUPANCY/ PARKING INDEX LOAD FOR 6 HRS. (VEH. HR) PARKING VOLUME (VEH/DAY) TURNOVER FOR 6HR. PARKING DURATION (MINS) Street 1 9.25 30 30.83 55.5 34.25 1.62 97.23 Street 3 8.25 30 27.5 49.5 33.75 1.47 88 Street 4 17.5 30 58.33 105 35.25 3.98 178.72 Street 5 13.5 30 45 81 39.5 2.05 123.04 Street 6 16.25 30 54.17 97.5 39.5 2.47 148.1 Street 11 23.25 30 77.5 139.5 76.75 1.82 109.06 Street 13 23.5 30 78.33 141 20.5 6.88 412.68
  • 43. Source- Urban Mobility India 43 DEMAND FOR PARKING-OFF STREET • Highest parking accumulation is observed at Chhattorigalli Multi Level Parking Plaza as the location is near to chowk bazaar road. • More than 50% of vehicles were parked for more than 4 hrs. • Gauhar Mahal parking lots is not used after 6:00 pm. • The average turnover of off street parking lots is around 4.9. ACCUMU LATION SUPPLY (L/2.5) OCCUPANC Y/ PARKING INDEX LOAD FOR 6 HRS. (VEH. HR) PARKING VOLUME (VEH/DAY) TURNOVER FOR 6HR. PARKING DURATION (MINS) Gauhar Mahal 43.75 47.5 92.11 262.5 63.5 4.13 248.03 Moti Masjid (Water Tank) 27 27 100 162 38 4.26 255.79 Imbrahimpura 58.75 68.75 85.45 352.5 82.25 4.29 257.14 Chattorigalli 77.5 102.5 75.61 465 02.75 4.53 271.53 Payga 28 30 93.33 168 57 2.95 176.84 Purana Kabad Khana 52 60 86.67 312 72 4.33 260 Moti Masjid 33 35 94.29 198 42 4.71 282.86
  • 44. Source- Comprehensive Mobility Plan 44 DEMAND FOR PARKING Total population of Bhopal City (M. Corp) 2011 1798218.00 Per Capita Trip Rate In Bhopal City (CMP2012 ) Including Intra-zonal Trips 1.37 Total Trips Of Bhopal 2463558.66 Total Trips Attracted In Study Area (%) 8.02 Total Trips Attracted In Study Area 197577.40 Mode Modal Split (%) Trip generated in study area ECS 2 wheeler 25 49394.35 12348.58 car 3 5927.32 5927.32 Total parking Demand in Study area 18275.90
  • 45. Source-Urban Mobility India 45 PARKING SUPPLY Total area of road in study area 276407sq. M Area of 1 parking in commercial area (2.5x5) sq. m 12.5 sq. m Total no. of on street parking 14440 Total area under parking 180500 sq. m Total area of road under parking 65.3% 2 Wheelers 4 Wheelers Total ECS Gauhar Mahal 30 40 55 Moti Masjid 27 27 Imrahim Pura 15 65 72.5 Chattori Galli 10 100 105 Payga Parking 30 30 Purana Kabad Khana 60 60 Moti Masjid (Peer Gate) 35 35 Total Off Street Parking Supply 385
  • 46. Source-Urban Mobility India 46 PARKING SUPPLY • Total parking supply – 14826 • 385 ECS is legal off street supply which is owned by the corporation and managed by private contractors. • Parking lots are having only parking for four wheeler • Thus all two wheeler parking ends up on the road. • This creates obstruction in free vehicular movement. 8507 5933 385 14826 0 2000 4000 6000 8000 10000 12000 14000 16000 Parallel 90 Parking Parking Total
  • 47. 47 PRBLOEM IDENTIFICATION • Due to lack of proper parking for 2 wheelers, people park on roads. • There is no proper system of on-street parking this leads to absurd parking on roads. • People park on streets for long duration of time, this causes inconvenience for people just want a quick stop. • Roads are narrow near some residential places this forces people living in these areas to park their vehicles at the nearest possible location available, which is undesirable.
  • 49. 49 CONCEPT CBD/Commercial/Developed Area Suburban/Residential/Developing Area Short (5 years) •Provision of on-street parking •Preparation of regulation relating to parking and PPP •Building regulation for off-street parking •Introduction of resident permit scheme (for on-street parking) •Assessment of demand Medium to Long (10-20 years) •Provision of off-street parking •Building regulation for off-street parking •Implementation of regulation and enforcement for on-street parking •Provision of on-street parking •Demand analysis Items On-Street Parking Off-Street Parking Required Physical Changes Painting, installation of signage, parking meters, etc. Securing for land, paving, installation of toll collection system, other equipment, and construction of administrative buildings etc. Time for Development Relatively short (selection of site, painting etc.) Relatively long (Arrangement for finance, and construction of facilities) Operational Arrangement Inspection (enforcement) by traffic police or private sector is required Enforcement is not required and the facility can be operated solely by private sector Targeted Users Short term (casual users) Short to long term (monthly tenants, regular users) Source-https://sti-india-uttoolkit.adb.org/mod4/se2/001.html
  • 50. 50 CONCEPT • Provision of accessible battery operated coaches and boarding points for transfer from parking lot to monument entrances especially for PWD’s and elderly. • Accessible parking bays for removal and set up of a wheelchair from the boot of a vehicle or for use of a rear or side mounted wheelchair hoist. • To remove obstacles from carriageways thereby improving the steady flow of traffic and increasing carriageway capacity • To contribute to a city’s economic activities by ensuring a ‘turnover’ of different vehicles rather than long stay vehicles in commercial areas • To satisfy social objectives of supplying adequate parking space at certain locations for certain social groups e.g. residents, mobility disadvantaged Source- Generic Guidelines for Accessible Monuments under ASI and National Urban Transport Policy for India, Ministry of Urban Development, Government of India, April 2006.
  • 51. 51 PARKING POLICY Source- National Urban Transport Policy for India, Ministry of Urban Development, Government of India, April 2006. • Optimize existing parking capacity, before creating new parking facilities. • Prioritize parking in the following order: physically disadvantaged, residents, short-term visitors or commercial activities, long-term parkers such as work commuters. • Utilize fees and fines from parking to invest in the building of car parks and to improve public transport. • Develop public-private partnerships (PPP) for the operation of either on-street or (more often) off- street parking facilities.
  • 52. 52 CASE STUDY- PRAYAGRAJ Source- Comprehensive Mobility Plan for Allahabad 2012 Parking was a major problem in the city due to insufficient off-street parking facility, unorganized off-street parking. During peak hours proper parking spaces got filled by local traders and shop owners itself. It was observed that 56% was 2-wheelers, 32% was 4-wheelers and rest was 3 wheelers or NMT. There was a large demand and supply gap, as there was excess demand for on-street parking as there was inadequate off-street parking, lack of organised on-street parking facilities, and lack of strict enforcement mechanism, vehicles were parked on-street in an unorganised manner which caused congestion and reduction of traffic speed. This demanded for the creation of off-street parking and organized on-street parking facilities.
  • 53. Source- Comprehensive Mobility Plan for Allahabad 2012 53 PRAYAGRAJ PARKING PROPOSAL • CMP for Allahabad proposed the creation of off-street parking facilities in order to augment the parking supply. • And also seeks to discourage the use of private vehicles by promoting public transport, parking lots for private vehicles at major transit interchange nodes such as bus terminals, bus stations as park and ride facility and thereby reducing private vehicle ownership so as to restrict the demand for parking. • Differential rate scheme for parking depending upon the location of parking, i.e., the parking rate at places other than the transit interchange node would ne 1.5 to 2 times higher. • Regulation of on-street parking to enforce proper mechanism. And reducing the demand on parking and congestion on roads. PHASES PROJRCT COST (Rs Crore) Short Term: 2013-2016 Off-street parking 18 On street Parking 0.67 Medium Term: 2017-2021 Creation of Park and ride facilities 57 Total 75.67
  • 54. 54 FUNDING OF PRAYAGRAJ PROJECT • JNNURM 1. Government of India grant under JnNURM: 50% 2. State Government grant under JnNURM: 20% 3. Contribution from Cities/ ULBs: 30% • Cess on Turnover • Betterment Levy through Value Capture Mechanism • Shops and Establishment Levy • Viability Gap Funding Source- Comprehensive Mobility Plan for Allahabad 2012
  • 55. 55 PROJECT AFTER COMPLETION Although there is on-street parking and proper enforcement but still due to shortage of off-street parking there is congestion. To reduce this planning only for proper parking is not sufficient, we have to think about NMT and pedestrian movements as well.
  • 56. 56 PROPOSALS Source- Institute for Transportation and Development Policy Create a parking management unit that brings together urban local bodies, traffic police, and other stakeholders. Staff the parking management unit with competent professionals who are capable of monitoring system operations. Engage service providers to set up and operate the system in return for a performance-based service fee. For better management of parking we can adhere to the following- 1. Implement Smart Parking System 2. Use parking revenue to build people friendly streets 3. Price parking to manage demand 4. Restrict the supply of parking 5. Improve access to transit
  • 58. Source- Institute for Transportation and Development Policy 58 IMPLEMENT SMART PARKING Mark parking slots Install customer oriented parking systems
  • 59. Source- Institute for Transportation and Development Policy 59 IMPLEMENT SMART PARKING Disseminate information about parking policies
  • 60. Source- Institute for Transportation and Development Policy 60 IMPLEMENT SMART PARKING Enforce parking rules
  • 61. 61 PROPOSED PARKING • Parallel on street parking for road for 2 and 4 wheelers. • Perpendicular off street parking for 2 and 4 wheelers. • Creation of off-street parking near residential areas so that people living near narrow lanes can park their vehicles.
  • 62. 62 PROPOSED ROADS AND AREAS FOR PARKING Length of 20-22 meter roads- 2092 m. PROPOSED OFF STREET PARKING STREETS FOR ON-STREET PARKING Length of 12-15 meter roads- 11,565 m Length of 7 meter roads- 7,165 m Area of the off parking region- 9965 m. sq
  • 63. 63 PROPOSED PARKING SPACE WIDTH PARKING LANE LENGHT TOTAL PARKING LENGTH 7 METRE 1 7165 M 7165 M 12-15 METRE 2 11565 M 23130 M 20-22 METRE 2 2092 M 4184 M TOTAL 20822 M 34479 M LENGTH/AREA OF ROAD/PLOT LENGTH/AREA OF A PARKING NO. OF PARKINGS 34479 M 5 M 6896 9965 M. SQ. 12 M. SQ. 830 TOTAL 7626 By leaving space for commutation within the plots the total parking space can be about 7000 ECS. Apart from this there already exist 7 parking. By adding them we get a total of 7385 ECS.
  • 64. 64 CONTROL OF PARKING Building density doesn’t create traffic—more parking does. So build transit, add density, and cut parking! Source- Institute for Transportation and Development Policy
  • 65. 65 RESTRICTING SUPPLY Rather than creating parking in a fixed ratio to built space, limit the supply of off-street parking and charge separately for it. Rent parking spaces separately Cap parking but allow density Charge for off-street parking Remove parking minimums Source- Institute for Transportation and Development Policy
  • 66. Source- Institute for Transportation and Development Policy 66 PRICE PARKING The price of parking influences user choice. When demand is high, increase the price so that people who have the highest willingness to pay are able to find vacant slots. Charge on high-occupancy streets Set price based on Start charging for parking on streets with peak-period occupancy greater than 60 per cent. Increase the price when demand is high—i.e., when occupancy is more than 90 per cent. Location Parking duration Vehicle size Time of day
  • 67. 67 PRICE PARKING Source- Institute for Transportation and Development Policy
  • 68. 68 BUILD PEOPLE FRIENDLY STREETS Source- Institute for Transportation and Development Policy Use surplus parking revenue to fund zonal improvements that shift people away from cars and towards walking, cycling, and public transport.
  • 69. 69 IMPROVE ACCESS TO TRANSIT Don’t build park-and-ride facilities in urban centers. Instead, improve transit access by creating a dense network of walking, cycling, and feeder service routes. Source- Institute for Transportation and Development Policy
  • 70. 70 IMPROVE ACCESS TO TRANSIT • Increasing the number of charted bicycles so promote NMT • Introducing battery operated coaches to provide accessibility.
  • 71. 71 IMPACT OF PROPOSAL SOCIAL IMPACT ECONOMIC IMPACT ENVIRONMENTAL IMPACT PHYSICAL IMPACT • This will encourage people to use bicycles or to walk, hence improving their health. • Congestion free environment helps reducing the stress level of people. • Promoting the use of NMT would go a long way in reducing air pollution • Congestion leads to honking, which in turns lead to noise pollution. This proposal will help to reduce it. • Introducing battery operated rickshaws would help create employment for the people. • Congestion free roads would attract more people to the commercial area, hence creating more revenue. • Proper parking would lead to congestion free roads. • Encouraging NMT would help in improving the landscape.
  • 72. 72 RESOURCE MOBILIZATION AND IMPLEMENTATION Resource mobilization and implementation is an integral part of any plan as it tells us the feasibility of our plan. Within resource mobilization and implementation there are various aspects that come- • Institutional Set-Up for Implementation • Physical Infrastructure Development Phasing • Resource Mobilization for Implementation through Public Private and Other Sources
  • 73. 73 INSTITUTIONAL SET-UP FOR IMPLEMENTATION For this proposal various infrastructures have to be set up- • On-Street parking has to be demarcated. • Off-Street parking has to be made. • Pay and Park Facility • Control Centres are to be set up • CCTV cameras are to be set at various locations • Chartered bicycles stands • Battery operated rickshaw stand
  • 74. 74 PHYSICAL INFRASTRUCTURE DEVELOPMENT PHASING Phase Project Short Term (3 Years) On Street Parking Off-Street Parking Setting up of control centre Setting up of CCTV Chartered Bicycles Battery operated rickshaw stand Medium Term (5 Years) Making pedestrian friendly roads
  • 75. 75 RESOURCE MOBILIZATION FOR IMPLEMENTATION Shops and Establishment Levy Viability Gap Funding Cess on Turnover PPP Model
  • 76. 76 CONTINGENCY PLAN Metro station would be built in the area and it would tale some bulk from the traffic. FAR of 2.0 is allowed within the site, so off-street parking can be upgraded as per the need.
  • 79. 79 INTRODUCTION • An integrated planning approach to focus on revitalisation of obliviated heritage sites, by emphasizing on Heritage conservation and Urban Transport policy. • Supplement to the ongoing metro project, to make the area vibrant in social, economical, heritage conservational, environmental and physical aspects. • Modelling the behaviour of people towards non motorised transport and active mobility. ECONOMY PSYCHOLOGY SOCIETY Source- Active Mobility Bringing Together Transport Planning, Urban Planning, & Public Health
  • 80. 80 METHODOLOGY PLANNING PARADIGM Implementation of norms for the construction of Underground Metro Station, rendering the area to be prohibited for traffic. The behavioural change in the people make them use active mode of transport often. Dynamic survey to be held to understand the contemporary demands of people. Implement the policies and norms according to the survey insights, to formulate which type of infrastructure is required. An INCREMENTAL as well as STRATEGIC approach of planning in evidently required to alter the socio-economic, infrastructural and psychological environment of the proposed area. Integrated approach of planning legislation, planning practices and state of the art technologies can achieve it. Based on Public Private Partnership the model shall work in the following steps.
  • 81. 81 PROBLEM IDENTIFICATION TRAFFIC FLOW STATION VEHICLES PASSENGER CAR UNIT PASSENGER PASSENGER -PHPDT PCU-PHPCT CURFEW WALI MATA KA MANDIR 41258 28692 107162 6730 1842 Source- TRAFFIC FLOW: Traffic Pre-Feasibility Study for Bhopal Metro Report, Delhi Metro Rail Corporation, Noise Meter Jinasys NOISE POLLUTION 0 10 20 30 40 50 60 70 80 90 100 NOISE LEVEL GRAPH AT PEER GATE DECIBEL PEAK DECIBEL EQUIVALENT SOUND PRESSURE The Ambient Noise Level were recorded at the peak time of traffic that is 18 hours 30 minutes, at the location on 6th November 2020. The graph highlights that average equivalent sound pressure was found to be 67.51 Decibels. The overall decibel revolves around 67 Decibels, but the average peak observations are recorded 83.19 Decibels. The Noise Pollution (Regulation & Control) Rules, 2000 focus on minimising noise levels to optimised and comfort value. The readings have been recorded on noise meter app by jinasys. Category of Area Day Time Night-Time Industrial Area 75 70 Commercial Area 65 55 Residential Area 55 45 Special Area 50 40 Source- The Noise Pollution (Regulation and Control) Rules, 2000
  • 82. 82 AIR QUALITY INDEX Source- National Air Quality Index, Central Pollution Control Board, Ministry of Environment, Forests and Climate Change; Breezometer App The image highlights the air quality recorded on 6th November 2020, which highlights high amount of particulate matter, nitrous oxide, ammonia, sulphur dioxide, carbon monoxide and ozone. The centre is located at TT Nagar, Bhopal. The ambient Air quality is function to the location, which reduces in green cover and increases in dense urban form. Peer Gate location is situated at a nodal point having extensive traffic and urban dense form, which eventually will increase the Air Quality Index to relatively unhealthy levels. The proposal shall render the pollution levels, noise levels and traffic congestion problems reduce to great extent further enhancing the comfort.
  • 83. 83 Source- Delhi ‘s Iconic Chandni Chowk Got A Makeover & Results Are Stunning, Chadni Chowk New Look – The Indian Express SIMULATION RESULTS Simulation modelling is essential to assess the output of proposal prior to its execution and its efficacy for different parameters. The viability of project is assessed on past Case study on similar account, Isovist and Isochrone map.
  • 84. 84 Source- ARC MAP, Network Analyst tool ISOCHRONE MAP FOR THE SITE Simulation modelling in ARC MAP highlights the distance reachable within different time durations from the metro station. The area encompassed within 10 minutes of walking speed in one third of the old city market. The simulation was input with walking speed of 0.8 meters which was empirical defined from past researches conducted in the similar setting around India. (Chandra 2013), (Rastogi 2011), (Laxman, Rastogi and Chandra 2010)
  • 85. Insights: Koohsari, M. J.-C. 2016 85 PEER GATE PROPOSAL ISOVIST MAP
  • 86. Source- SUSHIL BARKHANIA - 181109029 86
  • 87. Source- SUSHIL BARKHANIA - 181109029 87
  • 88. Source- SUSHIL BARKHANIA - 181109029 88
  • 89. Source- SUSHIL BARKHANIA - 181109029 89
  • 90. Source- SUSHIL BARKHANIA - 181109029 90
  • 91. Source- SUSHIL BARKHANIA - 181109029 91
  • 92. Source- SUSHIL BARKHANIA - 181109029 92
  • 94. Source- SHRAVNI VJIAYSHANKAR REDDY -181109042 94 METRO STATION SECTION Metro Station Entrance Concourse Curfew Wali Mata Ka Mandir Metro Station Platform Active mobility and Non- Motorised Transport Can be supported By Multimodal Transit Systems. This renders, Energy Efficiency, Pollution Control, Health of Citizen, and Planned Growth
  • 95. Source- SHRI KRISHNA KESARWANI -181109005 95
  • 96. Source-Benefits of Pedestrianisation and Warrants of Pedestrianizing an Area; N. Soni and others. 96 BENEFITS & IMPACTS
  • 99. Source- https://www.goheritagerun.com/gates-of-bhopal/ 99 ARCHITECTURAL IMPORTANCE • Cusped arch opening • Upper part has arched space for the chobdars to announce the coming and going of the nawab. • Top parapet has a crown with finials and jail of brick. • Islamic style-combination of stone and bricks. HERITAGE GATES • a square plan and has cusped arched opening. • A decorated five arched parapet with a crown mounted on the central arch Entrance of Sadar manzil which leads into a smaller main gate. • The first floor of the main gate has a huge terrace balcony, while the second floor features four domes, one in each corner. MOTI MAHAL GATE SADAR MANZIL GATE • constructed in the 1830s as a wedding gift for Sikander Jahan Begum, the first female ruler of Bhopal. • Architecturally it combines both Gothic and Islamic themes and the design is attributed to a Frenchman. SHAUKAT MAHAL GATE • part of the Taj Mahal Complex. • two tunnels through which the traffic moves • The tunnels are of double height and are attached to the extension of Taj Mahal Palace main domed gateway • The arch shaped structure dates back to the 1860s. • There is a mosque on top of the arched ways. TEEN MOHRE GATE 1 • part of the larger Taj Mahal palace complex. • It is located at an inclined axis to the domed gateway of the main palace. • octagonal structure with ogee arch • Built in dressed stone it is a solid, plain structure • contrasts with other ornamental gates of Bhopal • It is the remains of fortification wall that once encircled the Idgah and reached right up to Benazir palace and Sultania Infantry. DAKHIL DARWAZA BHOPAL GATE
  • 100. Source- https://www.goheritagerun.com/gates-of-bhopal/ 100 ARCHITECTURAL IMPORTANCE • The double arches of this gate are like military gate with cusped arch on the outer side and ogee arch on the inner side. The parapet and onion shaped finials at the four corners of the gateway are the only ornamentation on the otherwise plain facade. HERITAGE GATES • 300 year old; built by Dost Mohammed Khan • located in the heart of the city’s market • surmounted by thirty-six towers or bastions and broken in numerous places by gates and entry ways, both large and small. • Set at regular intervals around the gate were the nine main gates ; 6 were named after the days of the week • aligned to the north end of the central axis of the city. The gate is flanked on both the sides by bastion like circular towers. POLICE GATE JUMERATI DARWAZA • located near Putlighar in Shahjehanbad area and it is a famous gate during the Bhopal Nawab Era due to the inscription on top of the gate. ISLAMI GATE three tunnels through which the traffic moves built on an embankment over Motia Talab Built of sandstone, the tunnels are of double height and are attached to the extension of Taj Mahal Palace main domed gateway ‘three’ is an integral number in all constructions during Nawab Shahjahan Begum’s reign. TEEN MOHRE GATE 2 • Benazeer Gate is highly decorated double storeyed gate with two arched openings in a three bayed structure. • 130 year old; built by Nawab Shahjehan Begum in 1877 overlooking the Motia Talab a simple gate with double arches. The outer one has a cusped arch while the inner one an ogee arch. The gate is made of dressed stone and is topped with heavy dome shaped chattaries at the four corners. In the middle is the crown like parapet that is typical of Bhopal architecture. BENAZEER GATE SULTANIA INFANTRY GATE
  • 101. 101 THE DESTRESSED GATES The ancient structures lie in dilapidated states with threat of collapsing fort walls and hanging stones posing a treat to losing life as well as the cultural relics DEMOLISHED GATES 1. Peer gate 2. Imami gate 3. Bagh Farhat Afza gate 4. Lal Darwaza FACES TRAFFIC Heavy Traffic is faced by a number of gates which includes: 1. Bhopal Gate (rotary) 2. Islami Darwaza 3. Sadar Darwaza 4. Shaukat Darwaza 5. Teen Mohre 1 and 2 6. Dakhil Darwaza 7. Sultania Infantry gate 8. Police gate
  • 102. Source- Google earth 102 EXISTING ROAD WIDTH S.No Gates Road width (in m) 1. Sultania Infinity Gate 6 2. Kala Darwaza 6 3. Bhopal Gate/ Kabala Gate 16 4. Teen Mohre 1/ Taj Mahal Gate 9 5. Teen Mohre 2 9. 6. IslamiDarwaza 6 7. Shaukat Darwaza 12 8. SadarDarwaza 9 9. Police Gate 6 10. Lal Darwaza 5 11. ShahajahanabadGate/Da khilDarwaza 6 12. Benazir Gate 5 13. Moti Mahal Darwaza 6 14. JumeratiGate 9 15. Bab e Ali Gate 9 16. Model Ground Gate 3.5
  • 103. Source- Google 103 BCLL BUS ROUTE Bcll bus route Road Built up Water body Gate location Zone boundary Legend Upper lake lower lake ShahajahanabadGate/ DakhilDarwaza Sadar Darwaza Shaukat Darwaza teen Mohre 2 BCLL Bus- 2.8 M wide
  • 104. 104 PROPOSAL EXISTING CONDITION NARROW ROAD •Traffic congestion •Discontinuous drainage system •No sidewalk •Decreasing road width there by narrowing ROW Historical gate Two lane undivided road •No congestion •Rotary design •Side walk •Continuous ROW •Continuous drainage system •Conservation of historical gate •Street furniture's PROPOSED (ROTARY)
  • 105. PROPOSAL EXISTING SITUATION OF SULTANIA INFANTRY GATE • Existing road width 6m • Gate inner width 5 m •Located on Regiment Road •Lie on Y shaped intersection Proposed (Rotary) Sultania infantry Gate
  • 107. 107 PROPOSAL PHOTO GALLERY Shaukat Darwaza Teen Mohre 2 The development of galleries over the gates will provide a picturesque location to the visitors through the numerous citadels present in the gates. 1. Shaukat mahal gate: The ancient relic lies in the heart of the city. Developing its visiting gallery space will provide with a heartwarming view of the entire sequence of fort monuments like the Moti masjid, Shaukat mahal and Sadar manzil , Iqbal maidan etc. 2. Teen mohre 2: It's high mounted citadels are perfect to capture the arching Tajul masajid over the Motiya talab and also to appreciate the magnificence of the Taj mahal palace
  • 108. IMPACTS OF THE PROPOSALS FOR THE HERITAGE GATES
  • 109. 109 IMPACTS Physical Impact • The proposed rotary not only improves the traffic condition, reduces the traffic flow, provides sidewalk, continuous flow of traffic, and continuous drainage but above all, the proposed rotary enhances the beauty of the historical gate. • To support this statement, here is a similar scenario of another monument, that attracts a huge number of visitors daily even though the traffic problem at this location is less. • The proposed rotary will make the area more spacious and wider open, which will enhance the physical state of the area.
  • 110. 110 IMPACTS Social Impact • The proposals have a great social impact as these sites are not even considered as historical sites by the local people and the people don’t respect these historical gems. • The proposals are being suggested on the basis of enhancing the physical condition of these historical gates and improving the social situation in the nearby vicinity. • These proposals will impact the social views of the people by changing it and making it more respectable. The proposals are designed to attract the tourists to these historical places which were untouched by them. Environmental Impact • The proposals have environmental impacts as well. Though the rotary is proposed to increase the traffic flow, the flow will not increase air pollution as the flow is not unobstructed and will be continuing that will not only act as a barrier in stopping the air pollution from increasing in the area but may reduce it. • The proposed rotary focus on greenery near the gates. Increasing the greenery will have a positive impact on the environment.
  • 111. 111 IMPACTS Economic Impact • Though there is no direct economic impact but with increase in the traffic flow the area will also grow, with the introduction of a rotary new shops will be opened that will improve the economy of the area. • Tourist attraction through photo gallery will improve the economic scenario of the area and the attraction of tourists at the rotaries will also increase the revenue.
  • 113. Source- Bhopal Development Plan 113 HERITAGE CONSERVATION AND MANAGEMENT The Bhopal city is an amalgamation of different layers of Hindu, Islamic and Colonial periods. The urban image of the city is a collective visual appearance contributed by natural and manmade elements. The lakes, hills, and heritage buildings, are significant parts of the traditional form of the city that gives the city its heritage identity. The lakes, hills, and heritage buildings, are significant parts of the traditional form of the city that gives the city its heritage identity. The heritage areas which are interwoven with natural features of city are the identity of the city. This unique urban heritage contributing to the city identity and its image ought to be preserved. Bhopal is gifted with rare monuments and splendid areas of vulnerable architecture. The built heritage, comprising areas such as Jumerati Gate, Jama Masjid, Moti Masjid, and Gauhar Mahal, etc., ought to be dealt with utmost care and pride.
  • 114. 114 OBJECTIVE Data Collection Analysis of Data Problem Identification The object for Conservation of Heritage is to safeguard, conserve, restore, manage and maintain the built heritage of Bhopal city while regulating interventions and development activities, which may have an impact on the heritage. Source- Bhopal Development Plan
  • 115. 115 PROBLEM IDENTIFICATION • The increasing population, vehicles, and dilapidation of structures due to age are major causes of stress in city core. • Lack of financing support mechanism for heritage structures and precincts owned by private individuals leads to the deterioration of heritage buildings and replacement by the new structures. • Also, these areas lack infrastructure and amenities to meet the contemporary demands. Source- Bhopal Development Plan
  • 116. 116 BHOPAL DEVELOPMENT PLAN Data Collection Analysis of Data Problem Identification • It encourages convert evasion and preservation of the area falling within the old city zone. • It has the regulations to incentivize the conservation of heritage buildings for presence of heritage value through heritage TDR • Conservation of Heritage precincts and structures within this zone, preparation of a “Heritage Conservation and management plan (HCMP) for old city zone”. Source- Bhopal Development Plan
  • 117. 117 CONCEPT While planning, the basic concept that we have to keep in mind is to develop our zone to fulfill the contemporary demands while preserving its heritage. We need to sort out all the problems within the zone and increase the footfall of tourist to generate revenue. And to do so, we need to ensure the area is accessible for all.
  • 118. Source- GIS 118 H E R I T A G E S I T E S L O C A T I O N O F Monument Ward Taj-ul-Masjid 20 Kamalapati Palace 22 Moti Masjid 22 Shaukat Mahal 08 Taj Mahal Palace Golghar Museum 08 Teen Mohre Gate 1 Moti Mahal Gate 08 Dakhil Darwaza Sadar Manzil Gate 08 Bhopal Gate 08 Shaukat Mahal Gate 08 Teen Mohre Gate 2 Police Gate Benazeer Gate 08 Jumerati Darwaza Sultania Infatntry Gate Islami Gate Out of our zone
  • 119. 119 Data Collection Analysis of Data Problem Identification PROPOSALS To ensure that our area is accessible for all, we have given some basic general proposals, which shall be detailed out in the Heritage Conservation and Management Plan. Accessible Parking External pathways and landscape areas Toilet Facilities Public Counters
  • 120. Source- Generic Guidelines for Accessible Monuments under ASI 120 ACCESSIBLE PARKING • Provision of a large common parking lot at the entry • Restriction of vehicular movement within heritage site limits • Signpost of international symbol of accessible parking should be provided • Accessible parking bays should have side and rear transfer zones for removal and set up • There should be well defined step free and barrier free route with a tactile guiding path • All security guides/ guards should be sensitized and well informed about reserved parking for PWDs. • Battery operated coach to be provided from parking to site.
  • 121. Source- Generic Guidelines for Accessible Monuments under ASI 121 EXTERNAL PATHWAYS AND LANDSCAPE AREAS • Provision of continuous accessible pathways. • Provision of gratings on open drains. • Linkages and transitional spaces should not form obstacles to users. • Continuous tactile guide path should be provided • Tree branches and plantings at sides of pathways should be trimmed. • There can be benches and chairs with arms and backs at rest points along paths and routes.
  • 122. Source- Generic Guidelines for Accessible Monuments under ASI 122 TOILET FACILITIES • Accessible toilet blocks near the main entrance and exit of the heritage site. • A full range of user-friendly provisions should be made to reach the toilet blocks. • Accessible toilets should have the universally adopted symbol. • Improvement to existing General toilets. • Accessible toilet cubical to be provided in case individual toilet block is not possible.
  • 123. Source- Generic Guidelines for Accessible Monuments under ASI 123 PUBLIC COUNTERS • Publication counters should be at the suggested location. • Tactile guide path should lead from the entrance to the publication counter. • High and low counters should be provided. • Space in front of the publication counter should be provided for queuing and waiting. • A multi-media information panel to be provided adjoining the publication counter. • Accessible directional, multilingual and tactile signage to be provided as per standards.
  • 124. Source- Adopt A Heritage 124 IMPLEMENTATION AND RESOURCE MOBILIZATION The plan or detailed proposals that shall be given in the Heritage Conservation and Management Plan prepared by the urban local body can be implemented by the private sector. The basic idea is to follow the “Adopt A Heritage” scheme initiated by the Ministry of Tourism. The private company that shall adopt the heritage monument shall be known as “Monument Mitra”. The would be tasked to analyse the existing scenario, prepare a visionary plan for the monument they adopt taking into consideration the future demand of the place. Once the plan gets approved by the urban local body, the “Monument Mitra” shall implement it and the run it for a certain period of time and the transfer it to the government. Apart from revenue gain, the Monument Mitra shall have rights to the advertise in the site, provided that it does not hinder the heritage feature of the site.
  • 126. 126 Case study :Sabarmati riverfront development
  • 127. 127 NEED FOR RIVERFRONT DEVELOPMENT The intensive uses took their toll on the river. • Untreated sewage flowed into the river through storm water outfalls and dumping of industrial waste posed a major health and environmental hazard. • The river bank settlements were disastrously prone to floods and lacked basic infrastructure facilities. Lacklustre development took shape along the riverfront. Such conditions made the river inaccessible and it became a virtual divide between the two parts of the city. Original condition of the river near Vadaj
  • 128. 128 PROJECT OBJECTIVES • The project aims to provide Ahmedabad with a meaningful waterfront environment along the banks of the Sabarmati River and to redefine an identity of Ahmedabad around the river. The project looks to reconnect the city with the river and positively transform the neglected aspectsof the riverfront. • The objectives of this multidimensional project can be categorized under threetopics- • Environmental Improvement: reduction in erosion and flood to safeguard the city;sewage diversion to clean the river; water retention andrecharge. • Social Infrastructure: rehabilitation and resettlement of riverbed dwellers and activities;creation of parks and public spaces; provision of socio-cultural amenities for thecity. • Sustainable Development: generation of resources, revitalization ofneighborhoods
  • 129. 129 THE CHALLENGES • 12000 hutments on both banks of the river occupying nearly 20% of critical project area. • Unorganized Gujari Bazaar of more than 1200 vendors on the eastern bank and Court Litigation. • Nearly 200 Dhobis using both the banks of the river for washing activities. • Thoroughly polluted and contaminated Sabarmati through 40 storm water outlets.
  • 131. 131 Success stories • The Sabarmati Riverfront Project add almost 10,00,000 sq. mts. of parks, promenades and plazas to Ahmedabad. • The Sabarmati Riverfront Project help provide Ahmedabad with manynew cultural trade and social institutions (36,000 Sq.m). • Creating of City Level Recreational Activities – Water Sports andFloating restaurants. • Tourist attraction. • Recharge of Ground water Aquifers of thecity • Continuous Green coverage along the river corridor. • Elimination of Flood Hazard. • Creating Vibrant Urban neighborhoods and beautification of thecity. • Achieved A Multidimensional Environmental Improvement, Social Upliftment and Urban Rejuvenation Project
  • 132. 132 To save heritage Lack of identification of heritage Rapid urbanisation Low priority to heritage as asset Constant neglect & misuse. Haphazard & uncontrolled development. Large scale subdivision of land/ buildings Change of land use/structure Built heritage under enormous threat due to :
  • 133. 133 Making Heritage Part of Planning process Involving communities Involving academic/professional institutions Legal framework and development regulations Constituting heritage commissions/communities To save heritage
  • 134. 134 Proposals – Water Front Development Heritage display Periodic Cleaning Energy Generating Pedestrian
  • 135. Source- TRAFFIC PRE-FEASIBILITY STUDY FOR BHOPAL METRO 135 Energy Generating Pedestrian • People are forced to use VIP Road as a view point. • Traffic on VIP Road – • Avg. Daily vehicular count – 45047 • Avg. daily passenger count - 109494. • At least 8-9% of this traffic count consist of people wanting to visit the upper lake. • Provision – • A pedestrian walking • It will provide a safe space to admire the view and • It will also generate energy through the kinetic energy received from walking.
  • 136. Source- Power Technology 136 Case study – “Intelligent Streets”, LONDON • Installed in 2017. • Traffic free, sustainable technology. • Kinetic energy is used to meet the street’s energy needs along with solar energy. • Working – The flooring Is vertically displaced. Electromagnetic induction creates kinetic energy which can be used to power devices. • With one step – the pavement displaces vertically for 5mm. With per footstep – it generates 3 joules or 5 watts of continuous power. • That energy is either directly supplied to nearby electronics or stored in a lithium polymer battery. • Nine steps are enough to power one bulb.
  • 137. Source- Power Technology 137 • Data about people's movements can be tracked via wireless technology, so the number of footfalls and information about generated energy can be stored and analyzed in order to monitor the effectiveness and efficiency of the project. • Areas where the technology has already been trialed – • Olympic park • Heathrow airport • Shell football pitch in Rio de Janeiro • Saint-Omer train station in France • Indoor as well as outdoor use.
  • 138. 138 The Upper Lake has both rural and urban catchments. With a well-protected catchment, its water quality was of potable standard until recently. In the last few decades of the 20th century, however, many sections of the lake became surrounded by habitations as the city grew. These developments have generated anthropogenic pressures on the lake, thus accelerating its eutrophication and microbial contamination, and making the water unfit for human consumption without proper treatment. Because the Lower Lake is located within a completely urban catchment, it has been subjected to many negative anthropogenic stresses, its water quality degradation has been much more pronounced than for the Upper Lake. Water quality analysis of upper lake and lower lake
  • 139. 139 Water quality analysis of upper lake and lower lake
  • 141. Source- seabinproject.com 141 Periodic Cleaning • The quality of lake water has degraded over time due to waste disposal and pollution and they are in dire need of regular and proper cleaning. • Also, Sea bins will be put to use • Per year they can catch: • 90,000 plastic bags • 35,700 disposable cups • 16,500 disposable water bottles • 166,500 plastic utensils
  • 142. Source- seabinroject.com 142 Sydney – SEABIN PROJECT • The Sea bins were installed to prevent any more deterioration of the Sydney harbour. • In 12 months, 28 tonnes of marine debris was captured and 4.3 billion litres of water was filtered. • It is a smart-tech project solely focused on environment. The lakes are the ground water source of the water supply system of the city. The degradation of quality of water must be prevented and sea bins can be of great use. • The lakes contribute scenic and economic value. Cleaner lakes are better suited for the heritage zone.
  • 143. 143 Heritage Display The city of Bhopal has a rich heritage but there is no place for people to know it all. Hence, a Heritage display Is planned along the VIP road to exhibit pictures, videos and information about the history and heritage of the city. This corridor is to powered with solar power and the power to be generated by the mechanism used in the pedestrian.