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Create to Learn 2018 - Hobbs

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Renee Hobbs addresses the question, "How do we prepare learners for an unknowable future?

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Create to Learn 2018 - Hobbs

  1. 1. Renee Hobbs University of Rhode Island Media Education Lab Email: hobbs@uri.edu Twitter: @reneehobbs CREATE TO LEARN #digiURI ACCESS SLIDES: bit.ly/create-learn
  2. 2. Authorship is a creative and collaborative process that involves experimentation and risk taking. Students take on authority when they have a real audience and strategic purpose. When we create, we build upon what we have previously learned through comprehending & critiquing other media texts. Authors benefit from laws that enable people to engage in cultural conversation through using and sharing the ideas of others. Digital authorship is a form of social power that enables people to respond to the increasing diversity of information, entertainment & persuasion in contemporary society. PREVIEW
  3. 3. How do we prepare people for an unknowable future?
  4. 4. FAKE NEWS
  5. 5. Learners may infer from digital culture that being angry or mean will attract attention
  6. 6. @reneehobbs Media & Technology Create Unreal Realities
  7. 7. …anyone can create media
  8. 8. How do we prepare learners for their social responsibilities as consumers and creators?
  9. 9. LOVE HATE PRINT VISUAL SOUND DIGITAL Attitudes about AUTHORSHIP shape how educators use media resources for learning
  10. 10. TEXT: a symbolic unit of form and meaning
  11. 11. Authors are the guardians of collective memory Who is an Author?
  12. 12. Authors are autonomous individuals with vivid sensations and a powerful overflow of spontaneous feelings that get articulated through creative expression. Who is an Author?
  13. 13. Who is an Author? Lone Wolf Collaborator
  14. 14. Authorship is Multimodal
  15. 15. Authors are Unknowable It is impossible to truly understand an author’s motives, goals and intentions….
  16. 16. Authorship is about control, power and the management of meaning and of people as much as it is about creativity and innovation. Authorship is a Form of Social Power
  17. 17. We Are All DIGITAL AUTHORS
  18. 18. As you watch, consider: How does this video depict the the way learners create media?
  19. 19. DISCUSS: Why is becoming an author a transformative experience?
  20. 20. Authorship is a creative and collaborative process that involves experimentation and risk taking. Students take on authority when they have a real audience and strategic purpose.
  21. 21. We know from Project Information Literacy that students actively try to reduce the number of choices they have to make in order to get their assignments done. We know from the Citation Project that first year college students who use sources in their writing rarely write about them with much understanding. They don’t summarize sources, they harvest quotes. Nearly half the time, the quotes they use are from the first page of the source. We
  22. 22. Talking Back to Media with the MEDIA LITERACY SMARTPHONE
  23. 23. Kami PDF & Document Markup http://chrome.google.com A Student PDF Annotation
  24. 24. A Student Annotates a Video ANT Video Annotation https://ant.umn.edu/
  25. 25. Finding, organizing & comprehending information are all practices of digital authorship comprehension meaning interpretation search storage & retrieval curation
  26. 26. As you watch, consider: What skills & competencies are engaged?
  27. 27. Screencasting for Reading Fluency Screencast-o-Matic http://screencast-o-matic.com
  28. 28. As you watch, consider: What skills & competencies are engaged?
  29. 29. Screencasting as Literary Analysis Screencast-o-Matic http://screencast-o-matic.com
  30. 30. How does digital authorship advance intellectual curiosity?
  31. 31. Reading activates wonder & exuberance Creativity, Collaboration & Digital Authorship
  32. 32. At any moment, the reader is ready to turn into a writer. -Walter Benjamin
  33. 33. CHOICE MATTERS Hobbs, R. (2017). Create to Learn. NY: Wiley. BLOGS VIDEO PODCAST ANIMATION INFOGRAPHIC VLOGS & SCREENCAST
  34. 34. Cloud-Based Digital Tools Support Digital Authorship Writing KidBlog Google Docs Wikispaces Storybird Animation Animoto Powtoons OSnap Moovly Screencasting Screencastify Screencast-o-Matic Podcasting Anchor FM Video Production YouTube WeVideo Shadow Puppet Kizoa Adobe Spark Coding Scratch Ready Infographics Infogr.am Easel.ly
  35. 35. Trial & Error Learning Promotes Intellectual Curiosity
  36. 36. Perfectionism Kills Creativitity
  37. 37. Creativity is Combinatorial
  38. 38. CUT-AND-PASTE CULTURE
  39. 39. The PURPOSE OF COPYRIGHT is to promote creativity, innovation and the spread of knowledge Article 1 Section 8 U.S. Constitution
  40. 40. Author’s Rights 1. the right to reproduce the copyrighted work; 2. the right to prepare derivative works based upon the work; 3. the right to distribute copies of the work to the public; 4. the right to perform the copyrighted work publicly; and 5. the right to display the copyrighted work publicly. The Copyright Act grants five rights to a copyright owner:
  41. 41. EVERYTHING IS COPYRIGHTED …but there are exceptions
  42. 42. Ask Permission PAY A LICENSE FEE CLAIM FAIR USE Just Use it DON’T USE IT SELECT PUBLIC DOMAIN, ROYALTY-FREE or CREATIVE COMMONS LICENSED CONTENT Using Copyrighted Materials Choices for the Creative Individual
  43. 43. Section 107 The Doctrine of Fair Use …the legal right to use copyrighted materials without payment or permission when the benefit to society is greater than the harm caused to the copyright holder
  44. 44. Fair Use Creates Balance OWNERS USERS USER RIGHTS SECTION 107
  45. 45. Exercising Your Fair Use MUSCLES Involves Critical Thinking
  46. 46. 1. Did my use re-purpose or transform the copyrighted material? Did I add value? 2. Did I merely re-transmit the original work? Could my work serve as a substitute or replacement for the original work? 3. Did I use only the amount I needed to accomplish my purpose? Is Your Use of Copyrighted Materials a Fair Use?
  47. 47. When we create, we build upon what we have previously learned through comprehending & critiquing other media texts. Authors benefit from laws that enable people to engage in cultural conversation through using, sharing and building upon the ideas of others.
  48. 48. How do people learn to take on the social & civic responsibilities of authorship?
  49. 49. Creating with digital media involves a process of messy engagement
  50. 50. FORMATCONTENT AUDIENCEPROCESS Standard Practice Essay in MLA Format Teacher Turn in a rough draft on Friday Summarize Key Insights from the Reading
  51. 51. FORMATCONTENT AUDIENCEPROCESS Supporting Learning Through a Mix of Both Creative Freedom & Creative Control You Decide Class BlogWork with a Partner Under Deadline Pressure Causes of the French Revolution Essay, image slideshow, podcast, infographic, video, animation, screencast, vlog, social media
  52. 52. FORMATCONTENT AUDIENCEPROCESS Supporting Learning Through a Mix of Both Creative Freedom & Creative Control You Decide Class Blog Work Under Deadline Pressure You Decide GENIUS HOUR
  53. 53. FORMATCONTENT AUDIENCEPROCESS COM 416 Propaganda A set of 5 memes You DecideUse a Meme Generator & Work Under Deadline Pressure Summarize Key Insights from the Reading on Propaganda Family, friends, co-workers, future employers, the world
  54. 54. Student-Created Example COM 416
  55. 55. Student-Created Example COM 416
  56. 56. Student-Created Example COM 416
  57. 57. Student-Created Example COM 416
  58. 58. Learner creative control changes everything deeper learning
  59. 59. Digital authorship is a form of social power that enables people respond to the increasing diversity of information, entertainment & persuasion in contemporary society
  60. 60. Digital Citizenship
  61. 61. Digital authorship is a creative and collaborative process that involves experimentation and risk taking. Students take on authority when they have a real audience and strategic purpose. When they create, students build upon what they have previously learned through comprehending other media texts. Digital authors benefit from laws that enable people to engage in cultural conversation through using and sharing the ideas of others. Digital authorship is a form of social power that enables people to respond to the increasing diversity of information, entertainment & persuasion in contemporary society. REVIEW
  62. 62. How are your students “creating to learn” in your classroom? How are you supporting the development of students’ authority as digital authors? What current activities could be modified so that students experience the power of digital authorship? What potential impact might these experiences have for learners?
  63. 63. Renee Hobbs Professor of Communication Studies Director, Media Education Lab Co-Director, Graduate Certificate Program in Digital Literacy Harrington School of Communication & Media University of Rhode Island USA Email: hobbs@uri.edu Twitter: @reneehobbs LEARN MORE Web: www.mediaeducationlab.com
  64. 64. The Power of Two Design Studio
  65. 65. What Will You Create this Week?Design Studio
  66. 66. TO ACCESS THE PASSWORD-PROTECTED SIDL SITE https://sites.google.com
  67. 67. TO ACCESS THE SIDL SITE https://sites.google.com
  68. 68. TO ACCESS THE SIDL SITE https://sites.google.com
  69. 69. TO ACCESS THE SIDL SITE https://sites.google.com
  70. 70. TO ACCESS THE SIDL SITE https://sites.google.com
  71. 71. LEARNING OUTCOMES FOR THIS SESSION • have a better understanding of the elements of Design Studio • appreciate the creativity involved in the inquiry process • see examples of Design Studio projects created by other educators • appreciate the value of partnerships for promoting creativity • gain familiarity with Adobe Spark • be inspired to create to learn

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