Promoting Health and Fitness
Patty Melody, M.A.
Los Angeles Valley College
Representing 1 of 9 colleges in the
Los Angeles...
Dimensions of Wellness
 Physical Health – ADL’s
 Mental Health
 Social Health
 Emotional Health
 Spiritual Health
 E...
Health Promotion/Prevention
 Primary prevention
 Secondary prevention
 Tertiary prevention
Incidence vs. Prevalence
U.S. Leading Causes of Death
 Cardiovascular Disease
 Stroke
 Cancer
 Diabetes
 Accidents
 Flu/pneumonia
Cardiovascular Disease
#1 Killer in the U.S.
 In 1993, 954,138 people in the U.S. died from heart
disease
 Forty two per...
ACSM GUIDELINES 2000
Coronary Artery Disease Risk
Factors
Positive Risk Factors
 Family history
 Cigarette smoking
 Hyp...
What is
Fitness?
The ability of the body to adapt to the
demands of physical effort
If the STRESS placed on the body is no...
Being Physically Active
vs. Exercise
Physical activity: any movement of the
body that is carried out by the muscles
and re...
Recommendations of the U.S.
Surgeon General
Moderate activity:
 on most, preferably all, days of the week
 a goal of 150...
Five Health-Related
Components of Fitness
1. Cardiorespiratory Endurance
2. Muscular Strength
3. Muscular Endurance
4. Fle...
The
Cardiorespiratory
System
Cardio:
 heart and blood vessels
 transports oxygen,
nutrients, and wastes
among vital orga...
Cardiovascular
Endurance
The ability of the body to
perform prolonged,
large-muscle, dynamic
exercise at moderate-to-
high...
Examples of Cardiovascular
Endurance Exercise
 RUNNING, SPEED WALKING, HIKING
 BIKING, DANCING, SKATING
 SWIMMING, CROS...
Metabolism
 Aerobic
 60-90% max hr
 Fuel production
with oxygen
 Slow movements
 Slow twitch
muscle fibers
 Anaerobi...
Your Target Heart Rate
Zone
(Karvonen Method)
1. Estimate your maximum heart rate
by subtracting your age from 220
2. Subt...
Benefits of
Cardiorespiratory
Endurance Exercise
Improved cardiorespiratory
functioning:
Reduces risk of CVD
Glycogen-spar...
Benefits of
Cardiorespiratory
Endurance Exercise
Improved cellular
metabolism:
 increases
capillaries in the
muscles
 tr...
More Benefits of
Cardiorespiratory Endurance
Exercise
Reduced risk of
chronic disease:
 cardiovascular
disease
 cancer
...
More Benefits of
Cardiorespiratory Endurance
Exercise
Better control of
body fat
Improved immune
function
Improved
psychol...
2. MUSCULAR STRENGTH
ACSM GUIDELINES
 1. MAKE SURE YOU BREATH (avoid valsalva
manuver- high blood pressure)
 2. SLOW-CON...
Major Muscle Groups
 Upper Body – pectoralis major, deltoids,
biceps, triceps, latissimus dorsi,
rhomboids, trapezius, fl...
3. MUSCULAR ENDURANCE
 Biking (lower body)
 Running, Hiking, Walking (lower body)
 Swimming, Arm Ergometer (upper body)...
4. FLEXIBILITY
 STATIC VS. BOUNCING (JERKY)
STRETCHING
5. BODY COMPOSITION
 PERCENT OF BODY FAT:
 WOMEN (8% - 25% BODY FAT)
 MEN (3% - 20% BODY FAT)
Principles of Physical
Training
The F.I.T. Principle
The Overload Principle
Specificity
Reversibility
Individual differenc...
Your Goal Exercise
Program Should Include:
The F.I.T. principle:
Frequency
 3-5 days per week for cardiovascular
 2-3 da...
Tips on
TrainingBe consistent
Have Fun
Make exercise
convenient
Make exercise
affordable
Listen to your body
Use the Buddy...
Thank you and Good Luck on
your road to a healthier YOU!
If you would like copies of this presentation please
leave me you...
Upcoming SlideShare
Loading in …5
×

Health And Fitness Lecture 2002

3,707 views

Published on

Published in: Health & Medicine
0 Comments
1 Like
Statistics
Notes
  • Be the first to comment

No Downloads
Views
Total views
3,707
On SlideShare
0
From Embeds
0
Number of Embeds
720
Actions
Shares
0
Downloads
50
Comments
0
Likes
1
Embeds 0
No embeds

No notes for slide

Health And Fitness Lecture 2002

  1. 1. Promoting Health and Fitness Patty Melody, M.A. Los Angeles Valley College Representing 1 of 9 colleges in the Los Angeles Community College District
  2. 2. Dimensions of Wellness  Physical Health – ADL’s  Mental Health  Social Health  Emotional Health  Spiritual Health  Environmental Health
  3. 3. Health Promotion/Prevention  Primary prevention  Secondary prevention  Tertiary prevention
  4. 4. Incidence vs. Prevalence
  5. 5. U.S. Leading Causes of Death  Cardiovascular Disease  Stroke  Cancer  Diabetes  Accidents  Flu/pneumonia
  6. 6. Cardiovascular Disease #1 Killer in the U.S.  In 1993, 954,138 people in the U.S. died from heart disease  Forty two percent of all deaths are related to CVD  One-sixth of CVD deaths are people younger than 65 years  More than 60 million (1 out of every 4) Americans have some form of CVD: hypertension (50 million), coronary heart disease (13.5 million), congestive heart failure (4.7 million), or stroke (3.8 million) (American Heart Association, 1995)
  7. 7. ACSM GUIDELINES 2000 Coronary Artery Disease Risk Factors Positive Risk Factors  Family history  Cigarette smoking  Hypertension  Hypercholesterolemia  Impaired fasting glucose  Obesity  Sedentary lifestyle Negative Risk Factor  High serum HDL cholesterol > 60mg/dL (1.6mmol/L)
  8. 8. What is Fitness? The ability of the body to adapt to the demands of physical effort If the STRESS placed on the body is not enough there will not be the need to adapt If the STRESS is too much the body may become injured
  9. 9. Being Physically Active vs. Exercise Physical activity: any movement of the body that is carried out by the muscles and requires energy Exercise: a planned, structured, repetitive movement designed specifically to improve or maintain physical fitness
  10. 10. Recommendations of the U.S. Surgeon General Moderate activity:  on most, preferably all, days of the week  a goal of 150 kcals/day (1000 kcals/week) Examples of one day’s moderate activity:  30 minutes of brisk walking or 15 minutes of running  30 minutes of raking leaves or 15 minutes of shoveling snow  two 10-minute bicycle rides or two brisk 15- minute walks
  11. 11. Five Health-Related Components of Fitness 1. Cardiorespiratory Endurance 2. Muscular Strength 3. Muscular Endurance 4. Flexibility 5. Body Composition
  12. 12. The Cardiorespiratory System Cardio:  heart and blood vessels  transports oxygen, nutrients, and wastes among vital organs and tissues Respiratory:  lungs, air passages, and breathing muscles  supplies oxygen and removes carbon dioxide
  13. 13. Cardiovascular Endurance The ability of the body to perform prolonged, large-muscle, dynamic exercise at moderate-to- high levels of intensity Key health-related component of fitness
  14. 14. Examples of Cardiovascular Endurance Exercise  RUNNING, SPEED WALKING, HIKING  BIKING, DANCING, SKATING  SWIMMING, CROSS-COUNTRY SKIING  STAIR CLIMBING, TREADMILL  ARM AND LEG ERGOMETRY  ROPE SKIPPING, OR ENDURANCE GAME ACTIVITIES
  15. 15. Metabolism  Aerobic  60-90% max hr  Fuel production with oxygen  Slow movements  Slow twitch muscle fibers  Anaerobic  90-110% max hr  Fuel production without oxygen  Fast movements  Fast twitch muscle fibers
  16. 16. Your Target Heart Rate Zone (Karvonen Method) 1. Estimate your maximum heart rate by subtracting your age from 220 2. Subtract RHR from maximum HR 3. This is your HRR (heart rate reserve) 4. Multiply HHR by 55-70%, then add RHR back to this formula. 5. Start at 55% or below if you have been sedentary
  17. 17. Benefits of Cardiorespiratory Endurance Exercise Improved cardiorespiratory functioning: Reduces risk of CVD Glycogen-sparing effect Increases ventilatory capacity Increases cardiac output Reduces risk of dying prematurely Reduces risk of developing osteoporosis Maintenance of body weight Reduces risk of developing diabetes
  18. 18. Benefits of Cardiorespiratory Endurance Exercise Improved cellular metabolism:  increases capillaries in the muscles  trains muscles to work more efficiently may prevent damage to cells Mitochondria
  19. 19. More Benefits of Cardiorespiratory Endurance Exercise Reduced risk of chronic disease:  cardiovascular disease  cancer  diabetes  osteoporosis Image source: http://www.nof.org/osteoporosis/index.htm
  20. 20. More Benefits of Cardiorespiratory Endurance Exercise Better control of body fat Improved immune function Improved psychological and emotional well-being
  21. 21. 2. MUSCULAR STRENGTH ACSM GUIDELINES  1. MAKE SURE YOU BREATH (avoid valsalva manuver- high blood pressure)  2. SLOW-CONTROLLED MOVEMENTS – Avoid momentum taking over the movement  3. FIND APPROPRIATE WEIGHT FOR 10-15 REPS  4. ONE SET – FULL ROM (range of motion)  5. 8 TO 10 DIFFERENT EXERCISES – utilizing different major muscle groups of the body  6. Work to fatigue - NOT PAIN!
  22. 22. Major Muscle Groups  Upper Body – pectoralis major, deltoids, biceps, triceps, latissimus dorsi, rhomboids, trapezius, flexors & extensors  Mid-Section – rectus abdominus, external & internal obliques  Lower Body – quadriceps, hamstrings, gastrocnemius, tibialis anterior, hip flexors & extensors
  23. 23. 3. MUSCULAR ENDURANCE  Biking (lower body)  Running, Hiking, Walking (lower body)  Swimming, Arm Ergometer (upper body)  Cross-Country Skiing (upper & lower body)  Stair Climbing (lower body)
  24. 24. 4. FLEXIBILITY  STATIC VS. BOUNCING (JERKY) STRETCHING
  25. 25. 5. BODY COMPOSITION  PERCENT OF BODY FAT:  WOMEN (8% - 25% BODY FAT)  MEN (3% - 20% BODY FAT)
  26. 26. Principles of Physical Training The F.I.T. Principle The Overload Principle Specificity Reversibility Individual differences
  27. 27. Your Goal Exercise Program Should Include: The F.I.T. principle: Frequency  3-5 days per week for cardiovascular  2-3 days per week for strength/flexibility Intensity  Reach target heart rate zone  Lift sufficient weight to improve strength Duration  ACSM and U.S. Surgeon General tell us: Minimum of 30 minutes per day  Institute of Medicine tells us: Sixty minutes per day
  28. 28. Tips on TrainingBe consistent Have Fun Make exercise convenient Make exercise affordable Listen to your body Use the Buddy System Train your mind by reinforcing the benefits Try new activities – Discovery is half the fun Get plenty of rest Pack your gym bag the night before Carry an emergency food supply Train for health as well as looks Drink plenty of water Follow the Food Guide Pyramid Give your program time to see results Love yourself NOW Incorporate rest in your program Don’t forget to cross- train Have a back-up plan Warm up and cool down
  29. 29. Thank you and Good Luck on your road to a healthier YOU! If you would like copies of this presentation please leave me your name and address Or Contact: Patty Melody at LAVC You can reach me at (818) 947-2907 or by email at pattymelody@aol.com

×