Indian seed congress-2013

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Chairman’s Presentation at Indian Seed Congress
CMD shares his view about Seed Industry’s contribution to agricultural transformation in India Seed congress which gives an overview of the Industry’s contribution as a whole and role of Nuziveedu as a leader.

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Indian seed congress-2013

  1. 1. The Future Of Indian Agriculture -Role of Indian Seed Industry- M. Prabhakar Rao Nuziveedu Seeds Limited 1
  2. 2. Evolution of Indian Agriculture 2
  3. 3. Evolution over 40 years 3 82 108 130 176 197 252 Food Grain Production Million Tons 7 9.6 9.4 18.6 18.5 30 Oil seed Production In Million Tons 5.6 4.8 7 9.8 9.5 35.2 1960-611970-711980-811990-912000-012011-12 Cotton Production in Million Bales Cotton Bale-170 kg (Source- Dept. Of Ag. GOI)
  4. 4. Productivity of Major Field Crops 4 To even out the effect of extreme weather variations *1998-99 data is avg. of six preceding years 1993-94 to 1998-99 **2011-12 data is avg. of six preceding years 2005-06 to 2011-12 Productivity kg/ha 1998-99* 2011-12** Crops Productivity Productivity Growth % Cotton 240.83 452.66 88 Paddy 1883.15 2180.50 15.8 Maize 1665.83 2228.83 33.8 Wheat 2529 2802 10.8 Pulses 599.3 634.6 5.9 Oilseeds 863.16 1026.5 33.1
  5. 5. But this growth not adequate 5 227 280 1.3X Food Grain Milk Vegetable & Fruits Meat /Fish/egg 2007 2020 2007 2020 2007 2020 2007 2020 111 270 109.8 202.2 11.6 30.1 1.8X 2.6X 2.8X Source: Estimate of Food Demand—Working Paper No. 209, ICRIER; NSSO Interviews Food Demand likely to go up from~ 450 MMT to 780 MMT in 2020
  6. 6. CHALLENGES & WAY FORWARD 6
  7. 7. The key challenges 7 Productivity gaps Technological interventions Govt. Policies & Regulation Labour shortage Challenges
  8. 8. Productivity gaps 8 9.5 3.1 Egypt India 7.8 2.6 UK India China India 60 85 63 Australia India Crop Yield (t/ha) highest vs. India Rice Wheat Cotton Sugarcane
  9. 9. Potential to increase production 9 Agricultural Production Area (Limited) Productivity Seeds R&D and Technologies to constantly improve seeds Nutrition (Limited) Irrigation (Limited) Agronomic practices New practices to match the genotype, extension and training
  10. 10. Keys to break Productivity barriers 10 Superior Planting Material Agronomic Innovations (improved practices) Extension services
  11. 11. Superior Planting Material • Genetic enhancement for productivity • Tolerance to biotic & abiotic stress through-  Superior germplasm  Introgression of GM or Non-GM traits  Use of molecular markers to expedite 11
  12. 12. Some Examples -  High density planting in Cotton/Maize  Direct Seeded Rice 12 Agronomic Innovations Right Products Right Agronomy High Yield
  13. 13. High density planting : cotton • Current seed rates of cotton at 1.61 pkts/ acre, translates to 7200 plants per acre • An increase in plant population results in direct increase in yield, with right agronomy • 50% increase means additional revenue of Rs.35k crores, net income of Rs.25k crores • Changing habits would require enormous amount of education and needs industry push and government support. 13
  14. 14. Reaching Farmers through Extension Private Public-Private Partnerships ( PPP) Public 14 Product development/ Marketing Teams Extension Workers Government encourages PPP’s and issued guidelines under RKVY The need today is to intensify Extension education by:
  15. 15. Case: High density planting + PPP Vidharbha Objective: To Increase the Productivity and Production of Cotton farmers by 50% in the Project. Main Concept:-  High Density Population  Formations of Effective Farmer SHGs  Use of Plant Growth Regulator.  Use of Integrated Nutrient Mgmt  Use of Integrated Pest Mgmt.  Post Harvest Management. 15
  16. 16. Areas of Interventions 16 Particulars Traditional Methods Under Public Private Project Plant Population Traditional spacing High Density closing spacing Micro nutrients Rare Applied based on soil testing Plant Growth Regulators Not Applied scientifically Applied scientifically Expert Assistance Not Available Timely Advice available Market linkage Not Available Available
  17. 17. Spacing and Plant Population • The above data is based on averages. The actual spacing / density has been adopted farmer-wise based on the soil type andWater Availability. 17 District Taluka Traditional spacing (Ft) Plant Density per acre Spacing under PPP(Ft) Plant Density per acre under PPP % increase of Plants Popl. Akola Akot 3*2 7293 3.5*1 12502 71% Telhara 3*2 7293 3.5*1 12502 71% Amaravati Daryapur 3*2 7293 3*1 14586 100% Anjangaon surji 3*2 7293 3*1 14586 100% Buldhana Sangrampur 4*1.5 7293 3.5*1 12502 71% Jalgoan Jamod 3*1.5 9724 3.5*1 12502 28%
  18. 18. PPP- Activities Done • Soil sample Testing of 1652 farmers and recommended use of fertilizer dosage accordingly. • Distribution of Seed Packets -20,676 packets • Regular Visit of Technical team to Guide the Farmer . • Conducted Training Programs in Three stages. • Supply of Micronutrients to Farmers. -103 tonnes • Supply of Growth Regulators- 3800ltrs. • Distribution Liquid nutrients for Foliar spray of 12MT. 18
  19. 19. Other Activities Done • 93 Registered Farmer Groups were formed . • Voice Mail to all the Farmers regarding Time specific activities for the Crop • Procurement of Kapas at Market Price at our Ginning and Pressing mill at Hiwarkhed. • Ginning of Kapas of Farmers at our Ginning and Pressing mill. • Facilitating Storage of Bales of Farmers. • Arrangements with Banks – HDFC bank, Yes bank and ICICI bank for Warehouse receipt based funding for cotton bales of Farmers. 19
  20. 20. PPP Project: Expected Yields 20 District Taluka No. of Acres Last year Avg.Yd(Qtls) Present Avg.Yd(Qtls) % Increase Akola Akot 3365 5.30 7.75 52% Telhara 2573 5.28 6.48 45% Buldhana Sangrampur 1924 5.30 8.43 60% Jalgoan-Jamod 473 5.00 9.50 90% Amravathi Daryapur 1290 4.91 7.50 45% Anjangaon- surji 713 6.00 8.75 23% Total 10338 Project Average 5.29 8.06 52%
  21. 21. 21 PPP in Maharashtra Visit of Dr Sudhir Goel Principal Secy (Agri) Maharashtra
  22. 22. Direct Seeded Rice (DSR) • Rationale:  5000 liters of water, a scarce resource, needed to produce 1 kg of Rice.  In India 66% of total available irrigation water used for rice cultivation.  Reduction of green house gases.  Improved fertilizer efficiency.  Amenability to mechanization.  Reduction in cost of transplantation. 22
  23. 23. Direct Seeded Rice Contd… • Situation in India  Some companies are promoting Direct seeded rice in Punjab with large scale trials ( Eg: PEPSICO approx 10,000 acres).  In the Godavari delta of Andhra Pradesh ,several farmers are adopting DSR technology ,primarily to counter the labor shortage • Main Problem for large scale adoption  Farmers are flooding rice fields mainly to restrict weeds  The main problem in DSR is weed control, currently famers are using pre emergence herbicides with limited success. 23
  24. 24. DSR Experiment Stage 1
  25. 25. DSR Experiment Stage 2
  26. 26. DSR Experiment Stage 3
  27. 27. Mechanization: Cotton Picking 27
  28. 28. Cotton Picking Mechanization Need :  Labor availability becoming an issue  Cost of manual picking is becoming prohibitive  Increasing productivity will further enhance these problems.  @ of Rs. 8/kg - total outflow on picking is Rs. 14,000 crores.  Without mechanization cotton cultivation may not remain feasible in a few years.  Opportunity to reduce contamination as well. 28
  29. 29. Cotton Picking Mechanization Requirements:  Right Genotype for high density / mechanized cotton farming  Developing suitable size machinery for small holdings for total farming from sowing to picking  Investments in pre-cleaners in Gins  Shift in marketing practices.  Farmer education – Preparedness thru extension 29
  30. 30. Policy Support from Government
  31. 31. Product Development • Procedure for quick release of new hybrids and varieties- The procedure needs to be shortened to a time period of 2 years for the release of new hybrids & varieties. • Cost of regulatory testing should be nominal • Reduce restrictions on number of entries • Rationalize testing Products between Centre (ICAR) and States (SAUs) • Clear, uniform and consistent parameters for identification of varieties for notification 31
  32. 32. • Price controls  Price controls may reduce investments in R&D • Fiscal incentives:  Tax Exemptions  Credit on soft terms for R&D investment  Duty free imports of equipment for Industry  Infrastructure building through nationwide mission mode approach like TUFS etc. 32 Price Controls and Incentives
  33. 33. Subsidy  Uniformity across the States in Policy and procedures  Provide Level play field for Private Sector as given to public sector  Give equal access to all popular products with or without notification. 33
  34. 34. Ideal Subsidy program • Karnataka/ AP model  Opportunity given to all seed companies with valid registration  Farmers get complete choice  No issues in quality /performance so far 34
  35. 35. Conclusion • Accelerated agricultural growth possible through-  Genetic improvement for yield enhancement including GM  Appropriate agronomic practices  Efficient Extension Services  Enabling Government Policies  Farm mechanization  Uniform subsidy policy 35
  36. 36. THANK YOU

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