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2018 Atlantic Builders Convention 18 Green Infrastructure Seminar

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Presentation from the educational seminar at the 2018 Atlantic Builders Convention titled "Green Stormwater Infrastructure Consulting: Chat with the Experts".

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2018 Atlantic Builders Convention 18 Green Infrastructure Seminar

  1. 1. Green Stormwater Infrastructure Consulting: Chat with the Experts Atlantic Builders Convention April 11, 2018 DevelopersGuide.njfuture.org
  2. 2. Panelists • Mark Cannuli, AICP/PP, Sharbell Building Company (moderator) • Kandyce Perry, New Jersey Future • George Vallone, Hoboken Brownstone Company • Elissa Commins, PE, CFM, Township of Brick • Ed Confair, PE, RLA, E&LP • Elise Eggert-Crowe, EIT, Meliora Design
  3. 3. SMART GROWTH RESEARCH, POLICY, ADVOCACY, AND ASSISTANCE
  4. 4. New Jersey Future’s Mainstreaming Green Infrastructure program  Working directly with towns to provide education, training and technical assistance to improve water quality, reduce flooding and sustain vibrant, healthy communities.  Facilitating and accelerating demonstration projects that show innovative, impressive, effective use of green infrastructure  Working with state agencies to update and improve rules, manuals, standards, programs, and review processes to facilitate GI  Convening a Developers’ Green Infrastructure Task Force to help developers and design professionals to learn about, finance, and build high-quality, cost-effective GI.
  5. 5. Developers’ Green Infrastructure Task Force The Task Force helps New Jersey’s developers and their design professionals learn about finance, and build high-quality, cost-effective green stormwater infrastructure.
  6. 6. What is green infrastructure? • • An approach to managing stormwater by either enabling it to infiltrate into the ground where it falls or by capturing it for later reuse. GI Practices: • Bioretention (rain gardens) • Stormwater tree trenches • Permeable Pavement • Green roofs • Cisterns & Rain barrels
  7. 7. DevelopersGuide.njfuture.org
  8. 8. GREEN INFRASTRUCTURE Elissa Commins, P.E. Brick Township MUNICIPAL PERSPECTIVE 2018 BUILDERS’ CONVENTION ATLANTIC CITY, NJ
  9. 9. LIMITED RESOURCES
  10. 10. MAINTENANCE OPERATIONAL EXPENSE
  11. 11. COST OF STORMWATER MAINTENANCE
  12. 12. REEVALUATED MAINTENANCE PLANS PARKS • Stopped Mowing • Began Planting DPW • Pipe Network Cleaning & Repair • Fences & Locks • General Site Safety AND GREEN INFRASTRUCTURE INADVERTENTLY BEGAN….
  13. 13. THE BRICK MUNICIPAL UTILITIES AUTHORITY
  14. 14. THE BRICK MUNICIPAL UTILITIES AUTHORITY Moses Milch Basin – Howell Township
  15. 15. THE BRICK MUNICIPAL UTILITIES AUTHORITY Brick Plaza, Brick, NJ
  16. 16. STORMWATER CHALLENGES The Last Stop for the Metedeconk River Drinking Water for 1000,000 Great Soils Strong & Permeable Tidal Influence of Barnegat Bay Most Developed River in Barnegat Bay Watershed Predominately Developed Drainage Area over 9 Municipalities in 2 Counties Brick NEEDED to be FIRST
  17. 17. METEDECONK RIVER WATERSHED MODEL ORDINANCE
  18. 18. BENEFITS TO BRICK • Applied to NON-MAJOR development • Defined measurable goals – A Predictable, Objective Compliance Path • Infiltration for Stormwater Quantity • Infiltration not required for Water Quality • Flexibility in the design parameters (Del Marva Unit Hydrograph) • Facility Dedication to Government Entity (Residential Only)
  19. 19. INCENTIVES CONSIDERED • Increased Building Area for Decrease in Impervious Coverage • Reduced Review Fees (Escrows) • Increased Signage Allowance • Use of Gross Tract Area v. Net Land Area • Exemptions from Board Reviews (where appropriate) WE ARE HOPEFUL THE MUA WILL IMPLEMENT INCENTIVES AS WELL!
  20. 20. ONE THING MISSING…
  21. 21. NJDEP – STAKEHOLDER MEETINGS STORMWATER MANAGEMENT RULES
  22. 22. SOME PROGRESS… SUBDIVISION EXEMPTIONS Through the use of Green Infrastructure “Landscaping” replaces Grey Infrastructure
  23. 23. TRADER’S COVE MARINA • At the interface of Metedeconk River & Barnegat Bay • Surrounded by Forsythe Wildlife Refuge
  24. 24. STORMWATER DESIGN • All about Water Quality • Permeable Pavement • Traditional Pavement • Drains to Porous Surfaces • Rain Gardens • Tidal Check Valve in Chamber TRADER’S COVE MARINA
  25. 25. Functional Park & Marina • OceanGro Fertilizer • Low Volume Mist Head Irrigation TRADER’S COVE MARINA
  26. 26. Green Infrastructure Design
  27. 27. Green Stormwater Infrastructure Bio-retention Water Reuse Pervious Pavement Renewable Energy Solar Wind Geothermal Sustainable Design Low Impact Development Recycled Materials Low Maintenance
  28. 28. Green Stormwater Infrastructure Kit of Parts Image Credit – Philadelphia Green Streets Design Manual
  29. 29. Stormwater Planter Image Credit – Philadelphia Green Streets Design Manual
  30. 30. Stormwater Bumpout Image Credit – Philadelphia Green Streets Design Manual
  31. 31. Stormwater Tree Pit Image Credit – Philadelphia Green Streets Design Manual
  32. 32. Stormwater Tree Trench Image Credit – Philadelphia Green Streets Design Manual
  33. 33. Permeable Pavement Image Credit – Philadelphia Green Streets Design Manual
  34. 34. Bio-retention Basin Image Credit – Philadelphia Green Streets Design Manual Mercer Meadows – E&LP Associates Circle Green – Field Operations
  35. 35. Rainwater Harvesting Image Credit – Philadelphia Green Streets Design Manual
  36. 36. Green Roof & Blue Roof Image Credit – Philadelphia Green Streets Design Manual
  37. 37. Deploying Green Infrastructure on Your Site
  38. 38. Integrate Your Infrastructure with your Amenities Image Credit – E&LP Associates & OLIN
  39. 39. Hoboken Northwest Resiliency Park
  40. 40. Hoboken Northwest Resiliency Park Image Credit – E&LP Associates & OLIN
  41. 41. Hoboken Northwest Resiliency Park Image Credit – E&LP Associates & OLIN
  42. 42. Hoboken Northwest Resiliency Park Image Credit – E&LP Associates & OLIN
  43. 43. Hoboken Northwest Resiliency Park Image Credit – E&LP Associates & OLIN
  44. 44. Hoboken Northwest Resiliency Park Image Credit – E&LP Associates & OLIN
  45. 45. Hoboken Northwest Resiliency Park Image Credit – E&LP Associates & OLIN
  46. 46. Landis Homes Retirement Community Image Credit – RGS Associates Location: Manheim Tonwship, Lancaster, PA Design Team: RGS Associates, Inc. - Landscape Architects, Civil Engineers RLPS Architects - Architect Land Studies - Envionrmental Consultants ARM Group - Geologist Project Highlights: 40 acre expansion of 114 acre campus Six (6) Three story apartment buildings - 75 units 70 cottages LEED Certification Green Infrastructure: Rainwater capture and reuse Native plant palette Raingardens & bioswales Porous Asphalt Stream Corridor and Floodplain Restoration Restoration of the adjacent stream and floodplain eliminated the need for three additional stormwater basins in the development. Additional Information: ASLA Stormwater Case Studies PA-DE ASLA 2008 Award Winner
  47. 47. Landis Homes Retirement Community Image Credit – RGS Associates
  48. 48. Landis Homes Retirement Community Existing development takes traditional stormwater approach
  49. 49. Landis Homes Retirement Community Image – Google Streetview
  50. 50. Landis Homes Retirement Community Image – Google Streetview
  51. 51. Landis Homes Retirement Community Image Credit – RGS Associates New development takes decentralized GI approach
  52. 52. Landis Homes Retirement Community Image Credit – RGS Associates New development takes decentralized GI approach
  53. 53. Landis Homes Retirement Community Image Credit – RGS Associates
  54. 54. Pennswood Village Image Credit – Sikora Wells Appel Location: Newtown, PA Design Team: Sikora Wells Appel - Landscape Architects Pickering, Corts & Summerson - Civil Engineers Princeton Hydro - Hydrologists & Ecologists Mellon Biological - Wetland Scientist Project Highlights: 82 acre quaker-directed retirement community Site open to study for surrounding schools Green Infrastructure: 13 acre pollutant removal treatment chain Native plant palette Warm season grass meadow Raingardens, bioswales, wet pond Additional Information: ASLA Stormwater Case Studies 2003 ASLA National Merit Award Winner
  55. 55. Pennswood Village Image – Google Earth
  56. 56. Pennswood Village Image – Google Earth New development takes decentralized GI approach
  57. 57. Pennswood Village Image Credit – Sikora Wells Appel
  58. 58. Somerset County, NJ Development Image Credit – Sikora Wells Appel & Sharbell Development Corporation
  59. 59. Somerset County, NJ Development Image Credit – Sikora Wells Appel & Sharbell Development Corporation
  60. 60. Design Charette
  61. 61. Jersey City Development
  62. 62. Jersey City Development
  63. 63. Jersey City Development What are the site constraints? What are the zoning and open space requirements? How many units do you need for a viable project? What are the parking and access requirements? Are there sensitive areas requiring permitting? What amenities exist around your project? Where are the opportunities for a value add?
  64. 64. Jersey City Development Define the Building Envelope
  65. 65. Jersey City Development Test Building Footprints, Open Space Layouts, and Buffers Building Buffer Open Space
  66. 66. Jersey City Development Concept Plan Image Credit – Hoboken Brownstone Company
  67. 67. Jersey City Development Image Credit – Hoboken Brownstone Company Tree Pits Cisterns Green Roof Water Reuse Permeable Paving Curb Planters
  68. 68. Jersey City Development
  69. 69. Jersey City Development What are the site constraints? What are the zoning and open space requirements? How many units do you need for a viable project? What are the parking and access requirements? Are there sensitive areas requiring permitting? What amenities exist around your project? Where are the opportunities for a value add?
  70. 70. Jersey City Development Define the Building Envelope Investigate street closures
  71. 71. Jersey City Development Test Building and Open Space Layouts Full Build Out BuildingBuilding Building
  72. 72. Jersey City Development Test Building and Open Space Layouts Concentrated Open Space BuildingBuilding Open Space
  73. 73. Jersey City Development Test Building and Open Space Layouts Dispersed Open Space BuildingBuilding Building Open Space Open Space
  74. 74. Jersey City Development Test Building and Open Space Layouts Centralized Open Space BuildingBuilding Building Open Space Open Space
  75. 75. Jersey City Development Concept Plan GI BMPs to Consider: Tree Pits & Trenches Curb Bumpouts/Planters Green Roofs Water Reuse/Cisterns Permeable Paving Image Credit – Hoboken Brownstone Company
  76. 76. Jersey City Development Detailed Site Plan Image Credit – Hoboken Brownstone Company
  77. 77. Jersey City Development Tree Pits Cisterns Green Roof Water Reuse Permeable Paving Curb Planters Image Credit – Hoboken Brownstone Company
  78. 78. Before & After
  79. 79. Rowan University Glassboro, NJ Before After Parking Median Image Credit – Princeton Hydro Bioswale Median
  80. 80. Musconetcong Watershed Assoc. Asbury, NJ Before After Abandoned Industrial Warehouse Image Credit – Bruce Livingston; E&LP Associates and ReVision Architects LEED Platinum Renovation, Geothermal Heating, Permeable Paving, Raingardens
  81. 81. Rutgers University New Brunswick, NJ Before After Existing Roof Image Credit – Roof Meadow Green Roof + Public Space
  82. 82. Mercer Meadows Mercer County, NJ Before After Unmanaged Field Image Credit – E&LP Associates Restored Wet Meadow & Bio-Retention
  83. 83. Waterview Recreation Center Philadelphia, PA Before After Captures street right-of-way
  84. 84. Greenfield Elementary School Philadelphia, PA Before After Highly visible, educational green infrastructure
  85. 85. Lea School Philadelphia, PA Before After Captures 2 acres of school and street right-of-way
  86. 86. Green Infrastructure Tools for Developers Elise Eggert-Crowe Water Resources Designer Meliora Design elise@meliora.design
  87. 87. Getting started with Green Infrastructure I want green infrastructure for my project…  Can be used to meet regulatory requirements  Variety and flexibility of GI techniques  Offers aesthetic amenity … but how do I get started?  Which techniques are most effective for my project?  How much GI do I need?  What are the construction and maintenance costs?
  88. 88. A quick note… Green Infrastructure (GI) = Low Impact Development (LID) = Best Management Practice (BMP) = Stormwater Management Practice (SMP) = Stormwater Features
  89. 89. Green Infrastructure Design Tools • Many online tools developed to assess GI • Compile relevant information (soil type, land cover, etc.) • Inform conceptual-level designs • Generate “what if” scenarios • Four web-based tools for today’s discussion 1. EPA National Stormwater Calculator 2. NYC Green Infrastructure Co-Benefits Calculator 3. National Green Values Calculator 4. Autocase
  90. 90. Use and Limitations • Using these tools • Planning- and conceptual- level design • Inform design process • Gather estimates of sizing, construction costs, and maintenance costs • Help communicate concepts to clients, planning commission, community organizations • Limitations • Lack of correlation with local and state regulations • These tools alone will not get you a permit • Do not provide technical support required for site-level design • These tools cannot be your engineer
  91. 91. 1. EPA National Stormwater Calculator • Intended users - both technical and non-technical • Site developers • Landscape architects • Urban planners • Homeowners • Tool focus • Screening level analysis of small sites (under 12 acres) • Informing user how well they can meet a stormwater retention target (example: manage first 1.5” of rainfall event)
  92. 92. 1. EPA National Stormwater Calculator Benefits • Free • Easy to run, store, and compare scenarios • Summary of construction and maintenance costs Drawbacks • Intended for small sites (<12 acres) • Not correlated with local regulatory requirements
  93. 93. 1. EPA National Stormwater Calculator https://swcweb.epa.gov/stormwatercalculator
  94. 94. 1. EPA National Stormwater Calculator Location Soil Type Soil Drainage Topography Precipitation Climate Change Land Cover LID Controls Project Cost Results
  95. 95. 1. EPA National Stormwater Calculator RESULTS
  96. 96. 1. EPA National Stormwater Calculator
  97. 97. 2. National Green Values Calculator • Developed by Center for Neighborhood Technology in collaboration with US EPA • Intended users • Planners • Engineers • Municipal staff • Tool focus • Pre-development to post-development comparison • With and without GI comparison • Volume reduction goal (no peak rate)
  98. 98. 2. National Green Values Calculator Benefits • Free • Follows similar methodology to municipal and state regulation • Provides estimates for construction maintenance, and life cycle costs Drawbacks • Does not align with all regulatory-based goals (e.g. rate control)
  99. 99. 2. National Green Values Calculator http://greenvalues.cnt.org/national/calculator.php
  100. 100. 2. National Green Values Calculator
  101. 101. 2. National Green Values Calculator
  102. 102. 2. National Green Values Calculator
  103. 103. 3. NYC GI Co-Benefits Calculator • Developed by NYC DEP • Intended users • Planners • Developers • Academics • Tool focus • Quantify co-benefits of GI (increased property value, improved quality of life, carbon sequestration, etc.) • Compare GI Options
  104. 104. 3. NYC GI Co-Benefits Calculator Benefits • Free • Useful for community outreach to highlight additional benefits • Social, environmental benefits Drawbacks • Developed specifically for NYC • Lacks basic site feature inputs (soil type, infiltration rate) • Not correlated with regional regulatory requirements
  105. 105. 3. NYC GI Co-Benefits Calculator http://www.nycgicobenefits.net
  106. 106. 3. NYC GI Co-Benefits Calculator
  107. 107. 4. Autocase • Software developed by Impact Infrastructure • Intended users • Developers • Engineers • Municipalities • Tool focus • Optimization of lifecycle costs of a project • Triple bottom line framework: economic, social, environmental costs Note: not affiliated with Autodesk
  108. 108. 4. Autocase Benefits • Pulls site-specific information from national databases • Aesthetic results panel for communication of results for planning commission or community Drawbacks • License model, most users pay between $1,500 and $25,000 • Social and environmental costs less tangible than financial costs • Not correlated with regulatory requirements
  109. 109. 4. Autocase https://autocase.com/
  110. 110. 4. Autocase
  111. 111. Use and Limitations • Using these tools • Planning- and conceptual- level design • Inform design process • Gather sizing, cost, and maintenance estimates • Help communicate concepts to clients • Limitations • Lack of correlation with local and state regulations • Methodologies, goals • Do not provide technical support for site-level design
  112. 112. Thank you! DevelopersGuide.njfuture.org • Mark Cannuli, AICP/PP, Sharbell Building Company (moderator) • Kandyce Perry, New Jersey Future • George Vallone, Hoboken Brownstone Company • Elissa Commins, PE, CFM, Township of Brick • Ed Confair, PE, RLA, E&LP • Elise Eggert-Crowe, EIT, Meliora Design

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