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Philadelphia Water Department, Green City Clean Waters Program

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This slide deck is from the City of Newark's trip to the Philadelphia to learn from the city's water department's green infrastructure program in September 2017.

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Philadelphia Water Department, Green City Clean Waters Program

  1. 1. Office of Watersheds Melanie Garrow Watershed Protection Kelly Anderson Water Resources Modeling Josef Kardos Regulatory Compliance and Risk Abatement Jeremy Chadwick Planning & Research Paul Kohl Linear Assets Planning Erik Haniman Energy/Research Emily Hill/Adam Hendricks Facility Planning Tom Spokas Green Stormwater Infrastructure Implementation Jessica Brooks Private Development Services Vicki Lenoci Bureau of Laboratory Services Gary Burlingame GSI Planning Elizabeth Svekla Stormwater Billing and Incentives Erin Williams Design Jillian Simmons Administration Tonya Bonner Quality Assurance and Support Services Bob Eppinger Scientific and Regulatory Affairs Rita Kopansky Environmental Labs John Consolvo Watershed Sciences Joe Perillo Materials Engineering Lab William Roscioli
  2. 2. Planning and Environmental Services Division (PESD) Marc Cammarata Office of Watersheds (OOW) Melanie Garrow Green Stormwater Implementation (GSI) Jessica Brooks Planning & Research (P&R) Paul Kohl Bureau of Laboratory Services (BLS) Gary BurlingameOffice of Watersheds Summary FY18 Total Operating Budget $13,556,000 FY18 Operating Contract Budget $10,696,000 FY18 Total Capital Budget $550,000 FY18 Capital Contract Budget - # of Operating Full- time positions 33 # of Capital Full-time positions 7 # Programs / Second Level Managers (3) 2nd level managers and (2) senior scientists # Groups / First-level Supervisors (10) 1st level supervisors # Temporary Employees 7 co-ops, 4 summer interns Planning and Research Summary FY18 Total Operating Budget $6,009,991 FY18 Operating Contract Budget $3,450,000 FY18 Total Capital Budget Approx. $500,000 FY18 Capital Contract Budget - # of Operating Full- time positions 23 # of Capital Full-time positions 9 # Programs / Second Level Managers (3) 2nd level managers with (2) staff engineers # Groups / First-level Supervisors (6) 1st level supervisors # Temporary Employees 4 co-ops, 1 summer interns, GSI Implementation Summary FY18 Total Operating Budget $4,996,279 FY18 Operating Contract Budget $1,846,000 FY18 Total Capital Budget $15,924,270 FY18 Capital Contract Budget $15,000,000 # of Operating Full- time positions 40 # of Capital Full-time positions 16 # Programs / Second Level Managers (4) 2nd level managers # Groups / First-level Supervisors (11) 1st level supervisors # Temporary Employees 6 co-ops, 4 summer interns, 1 graduate intern BLS Summary FY18 Total Operating Budget 11,048,908 FY18 Operating Contract Budget $1,942,000 FY18 Total Capital Budget Approx. $700,000 FY18 Capital Contract Budget - # of Operating Full- time positions 103 # of Capital Full-time positions 12 # Programs / Second Level Managers (5) 2nd level managers and (2) staff senior scientist/engineer # Groups / First-level Supervisors (10) professional level supervisors # Temporary Employees Approx. 10 co-ops, 2 summer interns
  3. 3. Philadelphia, PA • Population: 1,526,000 (2010) • Land Area: 135 sq. mi. • Annual Rainfall: 42 inches • Combined Sewer: 60% Separate Sewer: 40 % • Drinking Water - 1.73 Million customers in Philadelphia, Bucks, Montgomery and Delaware Counties) • Wastewater - 2.22 Million customers across 5 counties • Stormwater - Philadelphia City/County only
  4. 4. Integrated and Long-Term, Watershed-Wide PlanningIntegrating PWD regulatory requirements to achieve long-term health and aesthetics of our environment CSO Permit Requirements Stormwater Management MS4 Permit Stream and Habitat Restoration TMDLs Source Water Protection Stakeholder Goals Future Regulatory Requirements Integrated Watershed Management Plan
  5. 5. Watershed-Wide Issues • Water Quality issues • Odors • Low Dissolved Oxygen • Bank Erosion • Lack of Channel Habitat and Biological Diversity • Wetland Degradation • Poor Public Access to Streams • Dumping and Trash • Vandalism
  6. 6. A range of soil-water-plant systems that intercept stormwater, infiltrate a portion of it into the ground, evaporate and transpirate a portion of it into the air, harvest and reuse as a resource, and in some cases slowly release a portion of it back into the sewer system Cliveden Park Herron Playground Free Library of Philadelphia Green Stormwater Infrastructure GA = IC * Wd Impervious cover Water Depth Greened Acre
  7. 7. Multi-Benefits to Investing in Green Stormwater Infrastructure • Resilience to extreme weather / climate change • Provide green, open space • Advance livability and public health • Increase market values and attractiveness • Reduce stream pollutant loads • Create local, green economy • Support urban revitalization • Enhance the infrastructure network • Advance City-wide sustainability programs • Transform river and stream corridors • Preserve and restore habitat • Maximize return on every dollar spent • Fishable – Swimmable – Drinkable – Safe – Attractive – Accessible
  8. 8. Triple Bottom Line - Economic/Environmental/Social Benefits • Economic Benefits • Costs • Jobs • Property Value • Environmental Benefits • Ecological Benefits • Air Quality • Energy Savings • Carbon Footprint • Social Benefits • Recreation • Heat Stress Mortality • Aesthetics
  9. 9. Triple Bottom Line – People / Planet / Profit Product Environmental Benefits • Fish in streams • Swimmable streams • Habitat quality • Air quality • Energy savings • Carbon footprint Social Benefits • Safe and accessible streams • Recreation • Aesthetics • Public health • Social equity • Crime Reduction Economic Benefits • Property values • Job creation • City competitiveness http://www.phillywatersheds.org/ltcpu/Vol02_TBL.pd f
  10. 10. GREEN CITY, CLEAN WATERS COMPLIANCE TIMELINE 2009 2010 2011 2012 2013 2014 2015 2016 2017 COA Deliverables: •Green Stormwater Infrastructure Maintenance Manual Development Process Plan (6/1/12) •Comprehensive Monitoring Plan (12/1/12) •Facility Concpet Plans (6/1/13) •Water Quality Model Reports (2013-2015) COA Signed With PADEP June 1, 2011 First Evaluation and Adpative Management Plan Due October 30, 2016 Implementation and Adaptive Management Plan Submitted as the first COA deliverable on December 1, 2011 Long-term Control Plan Submitted Sept. 1, 2009 AOCC Signed With USEPA Sept, 2012 WQBEL Targets Must be met by June 1, 2016 EPA-PWD Letter of Agreement April 10, 2012
  11. 11. PWDs Path to Compliance  Projects implemented on public property, in the public right-of-way, and parks  GSI completed in conjunction with replacement of water mains or sewers  PWD typically initiates, funds, designs, constructs, inspects, and maintains the stormwater infrastructure Public Retrofits Smith Playground Development and Redevelopment Regulations  Development projects with an earth disturbance of 15,000 square feet requiring design, construction and maintenance of stormwater management practices that manage at least the first 1.5 inches of rainfall Paseo Verde Incentivized Retrofits  Financial incentives for the private sector to build, own, operate and maintain green stormwater infrastructure on private property Popi’s Restaurant Investment Philosophy
  12. 12. Opportunities & Barriers Diversity: Resources and Workforce GSI Maintenance Program • Professional Services Contracts • Special Service Districts • Equipment, Materials, Supplies Contracts • Business Improvement Districts • City Workforce • Requirements Contracts • Adoption Programs • PowerCorpsPHL Diversify
  13. 13. How can support at the local/state government level help programs like Green City, Clean Waters? • All sorts of funding mechanisms – Grants, Philanthropy, State Revolving Fund for green infrastructure projects • City sustainability efforts • Cities seeking to evaluate amendments to procurement process (i.e. Best Value Procurement) • Local stormwater development regulations and ordinances (including enforcement) • Public Private Partnerships • Innovation • Education, Outreach, Press, Marketing, Advertising, etc. the Value of Water! Seek Support
  14. 14. “Information from pilot projects will be collected to develop a cost effective GSI program by testing a variety of projects and evaluating them for a number of factors, including: • Ability to meet performance requirements • Ease of implementation for on-street and off-street settings • Cost-effectiveness of various physical conditions • Efficiency of various systems • Effectiveness of various materials • Ease of maintenance GSI ” Feedback Loops
  15. 15. Green City, Clean Waters
  16. 16. How Combined Sewer Systems Work…And Sometimes Don’t
  17. 17. How Combined Sewer Systems Work…And Sometimes Don’t
  18. 18. GOAL: Many Green Systems Rather Than 1 Costly Grey System $9 Billion Tank and Tunnel $4.5 Billion Green Approach
  19. 19. GOAL: Meet State and Federal Compliance • 2009 Long Term Control Plan Update • 2011 Consent Order & Agreement – Clean Water Act – Enacted by PA Dept of Environmental Protection (DEP) – Reduce Combined Sewer Overflow pollution by 85% – 25 year program – Manage stormwater from 34% of impervious surface citywide – Evaluation Plans every 5 years
  20. 20. GOAL: Manage Stormwater and Reduce Pollution Philadelphia’s 25-year Green Stormwater Infrastructure Program  Manage stormwater in the most cost-effective manner  Use our massive infrastructure investments to beautify communities and increase green space  Develop green infrastructure citywide  Mandate stormwater management of new development and redevelopment  Upgrade treatment plants
  21. 21. Consent Order and Agreement Requirements Metric Units Cumulative Amount as of Year 25 (2036) NE / SW / SE WPCP Upgrade: Design & Construction Percent complete 100% Miles of Interceptor Lined Miles 14.5 Overflow Reduction Volume Million Gallons per Year 7,960 Equivalent Mass Capture TSS / BOD / Fecal Coliform Percent 85% Total Greened Acres Greened Acres 9,564
  22. 22. Green City, Clean Waters What is a Greened Acre? • An acre of impervious surface for which the stormwater is managed up to 1 inch by a green practice • 1 Greened Acre prevents stormwater from one acre- inch of stormwater or 27,158 gallons from entering the combined sewer system
  23. 23. Green Stormwater Infrastructure Requirements 25-Year Implementation of Green City, Clean Waters Year Greened Acres Square Miles % Impervious Cover Managed 5 750 1 3% 10 2,100 3 8% 15 3,800 6 14% 20 6,400 10 23% 25 9,600 15 34% Assumes GSI storage equivalent to 1.0 inch of runoff
  24. 24. Green Stormwater Infrastructure Bureau of Laboratory Science planters Columbus Square planters George W. Nebinger School rain garden Kemble Park rain garden Greened Acre = IC * Wd Impervious Cover Runoff Depth
  25. 25. GSI on Streets, Schools, Parks and other Public Property 137 sites, 179.7 acres PWD has completed or is in the process of designing: • 485 Stormwater Tree Trenches • 73 Stormwater Planters • 49 Stormwater Bump-outs • 96 Rain Gardens • 12 Stormwater Basins • 141 Infiltration/Storage Trenches • 31 Porous Paving Projects • 28 Swales • 2 Stormwater Wetlands • 33 Downspout Planters • 15 Other Projects
  26. 26. GSI on (Re)Development Projects and Incentivized Retrofits 266 projects, 423.4 acres 38 sites, 234.6 acres (Re) Development Projects Incentivized Retrofits
  27. 27. GSI on (Re)Development Projects and Incentivized RetrofitsGSI on Streets, Schools, Parks and other Public Property GSI on Private Development and Redevelopment Projects GSI Through Incentivized Retrofits 38 sites, 234.6 acres 266 projects, 423.4 acres 137 sites, 179.7 acres + +
  28. 28. GSI on (Re)Development Projects and Incentivized Retrofits
  29. 29. SUCCESS! We have not only achieved our 5 year targets, we have exceeded them! Metric Units Base Line Value First 5-Year WQBEL Target Cumulative as of Year 5 (2016) Miles of Interceptor Lined Miles 0 2 7.5 Overflow Reduction Volume Million Gallons Per Year 0 600 1,710 Equivalent Mass Capture (TSS) Percent 62% Report value 70.5% Equivalent Mass Capture (BOD) Percent 62% Report value 88.9% Equivalent Mass Capture (Fecal Coliform) Percent 62% Report value 72.0% Total Greened Acres Greened Acres 0 744 837.7
  30. 30. 5 Year GSI Costs – Design, Construction, Construction Mgmt (as of June 2016) • (Re)Development Regulations Greened Acres: $10M – Spend approximately $2M/year in Operating costs to manage all aspects of the Stormwater Regulations program (Plan Review Staff, Inspections and Enforcement, Website and Data Management ) • Public Retrofit Greened Acres: approx. $40M / $225k per GA – $30.2M for Compensated Construction – $5.5M for Professional Service Costs (Design and Construction Mgmt) – $4M PWD Labor Costs (Design and Construction Mgmt) • Incentivized Retrofit Greened Acres: $16.5+M – $10.5 SMIP-related Design, Construction and Construction Mgmt – $5M GARP-related Design, Construction and Construction Management – $1+M to date for PWD Labor (Design Reviews and Construction Inspections) • ** Don’t forget about Maintenance Costs!
  31. 31. Years 6-10 Look Ahead – Double Our Output! Metric Units WQBEL Target Miles of interceptor lined miles 6 Overflow Reduction Volume million gallons per year 2,044 Equivalent Mass Capture (TSS) percent Report value Equivalent Mass Capture (BOD) percent Report value Equivalent Mass Capture (Fecal Coliform) percent Report value Total Greened Acres Greened Acres 2,148 Additional 1300 GA
  32. 32. Program Performance/Pilot Results Summary • The performance monitoring of GSI (results of infiltration rate, storage use, and drain down duration analyses together) makes a strong case that GSI systems are performing better than predicted using current engineering design assumptions – The systems overflow less often than predicted – The systems experience higher infiltration rates and faster drain down times than predicted – The systems have more excess storage capacity available than predicted over a range of events
  33. 33. Triple Bottom Line – How it begins to pay for itself Environmental Benefits • Fish in streams • Swimmable streams • Habitat quality • Air quality • Energy savings • Carbon footprint Social Benefits • Safe and accessible streams • Recreation • Aesthetics • Public health • Social equity • Crime Reduction Economic Benefits • Property values • Job creation • City competitiveness http://www.phillywatersheds.org/ltcpu/Vol02_TBL.pdf
  34. 34. Not your Traditional Return on Investment… • Public Health and Safety – Significant reductions in narcotics possession and narcotics manufacture • Crime – 10% increase in urban tree canopy was associated with a roughly 12% decrease in crime • Mental Health – Areas that have the most trees along the streets also had fewer prescriptions for antidepressants – …people reported less mental distress and higher life satisfaction when they were living in greener areas – Life satisfaction increased by 2% and psychological distress decreased by 4% – As green space increased within a 2.5-mile radius of where they lived, overall well- being increased proportionally
  35. 35. Michelle Kondo The Impact of Green Stormwater Infrastructure Installation on Surrounding Health and Safety American Journal of Public Health September, 2014
  36. 36. Not your Traditional Return on Investment… • Academics – Richer and poorer areas saw similar increases in scores with increasing vegetation – …that surrounding greenness has approximately equal effects on student academic performance regardless of financial status or gender – …consistent and systematically positive relationships between nature exposure and student performance – Views with greater quantities of trees and shrubs from cafeteria as well as classroom windows are positively associated with: • standardized test scores, graduation rates, and percentages of students planning to attend a four-year college • restoration from mental fatigue and stress reduction
  37. 37. Where we are going next… • Innovation – Cost reduction and efficiencies particularly within Design, Construction, Maintenance and Monitoring elements – Standardizing best practices – Expanding programs and incentives for private green infrastructure activities – Alternative Project Delivery Methods – National GSI Practitioners Information Exchange • Continue to generate more Green Jobs • Monitoring performance at scale • Grow community partnerships to engage in planning and to address local needs • Integrate CSO controls with flooding and climate change
  38. 38. PWD 2017 Organizational Chart
  39. 39. Office of Watersheds and GSI Organizational Chart
  40. 40. Pathway to Green
  41. 41. Elizabeth Svekla, AICP Green Stormwater Planning Jillian Simmons, PE Green Stormwater Design Meg Malloy Green Stormwater Operations GSI Planning, Design, and Maintenance September 13, 2017
  42. 42. GSI PLANNING
  43. 43. BACKGROUND | Building GSI in Philadelphia Stormwater Regulations (Development) Incentivized Retrofits (SMIP/GARP) Public Retrofits (Green Streets, Parks, Facilities, etc.) Green City, Clean Waters Goals The three main ways Green Stormwater Infrastructure (GSI) is built in the city…
  44. 44. GSI PLANNING | Starting Point • Street and Sidewalk Width • Number of Parcels on Street • Building Setback • Presence & Use of On-Street Parking • Presence of Street Trees • Existing Utilities • Slope • Soils / Infiltration Capacity • Community Support & Capacity for Maintenance • Concurrent Projects
  45. 45. GSI PLANNING | District Planning Approach
  46. 46. GSI PLANNING | District Planning Approach
  47. 47. GSI PLANNING | District Planning Approach 1 2 3 4
  48. 48. GSI PLANNING | Priorities Surface vs. Subsurface Systems
  49. 49. GSI PLANNING | Priorities Volume and Water Quality
  50. 50. GSI PLANNING | Priorities Alignment with other Initiatives
  51. 51. GSI PLANNING | Full Process
  52. 52. Study Area Analysis Large Area Disconnection Analysis Capital Alignment Recommended Projects Planning Process Methods for Project ID GSI PLANNING | Process
  53. 53. GSI PLANNING | Detailed Analysis
  54. 54. GSI PLANNING | Opportunities
  55. 55. GSI PLANNING | Opportunities
  56. 56. Playgrounds & Rec Centers GSI PLANNING | Project Types
  57. 57. GSI PLANNING | Project Types Park Sites
  58. 58. GSI PLANNING | Project Types School Yards
  59. 59. GSI PLANNING | Project Types School Yards
  60. 60. GSI PLANNING | Project Types Vacant Land
  61. 61. GSI PLANNING | Project Types Libraries & City Facilities
  62. 62. GSI PLANNING | Project Types Large Projects
  63. 63. GSI PLANNING | Example Study Area
  64. 64. GSI PLANNING | Example Study Area
  65. 65. GSI PLANNING | Example Study Area
  66. 66. GSI PLANNING | Example Study Area
  67. 67. GSI PLANNING | Example Study Area
  68. 68. GSI PLANNING | Example Study Area
  69. 69. GSI PLANNING | Example Study Area
  70. 70. GSI PLANNING | Example Study Area
  71. 71. GSI PLANNING | Example Study Area
  72. 72. GSI PLANNING | Example Study Area
  73. 73. GSI PLANNING | Packaging
  74. 74. Renderings GSI PLANNING | Concept Development
  75. 75. • GSI Planning and Design Manual • GIS Base Map • Data Tracking Spreadsheet • PlanIT Database and Map Interface GSI PLANNING | Key Resources
  76. 76. GSI DESIGN
  77. 77. DESIGN | Outline 1. Organization 2. Process & Approach 3. Typical SMP Types 4. Resources 5. Lessons Learned
  78. 78. DESIGN | Organization
  79. 79. DESIGN | Process 50% 70% 90% 100% 30%
  80. 80. • Maximize the Managed Drainage Area • Achieve water quality goals – Promote infiltration and evapotranspiration – Slow release where infiltration not feasible • Minimize Cost • Adhere to Philadelphia Water standards • Consider Site Context DESIGN | Approach
  81. 81. DESIGN | Subsurface Storage
  82. 82. DESIGN | Bumpout
  83. 83. DESIGN | Planter
  84. 84. DESIGN | Rain Garden
  85. 85. DESIGN | Swale
  86. 86. DESIGN | Large Subsurface Storage
  87. 87. DESIGN | Key Resources www.philadelphiawater.org/gsi/planning- design
  88. 88. WORKFLOW • Outlines roles and responsibilities for provider and PWD staff • Summary and detailed workflows with descriptions for each step DESIGN | GSI Planning & Design Manual
  89. 89. Guidelines & Requirements • Section 3.3 of Manual • Guidelines on general principles • Detailed requirements that must be followed DESIGN | GSI Planning & Design Manual
  90. 90. Landscape Design Guidebook • Guidelines for plant selection and placement • PWD Approved GSI Plant List • Example planting plans for various SMPs DESIGN | Landscape Design Guidebook
  91. 91. • Functional details for: – Tree trench – Stormwater tree – Planter – Bumpout – Permeable Pavement – Rain Garden • Component details for: – Inlets – Pipes – Some SMPs – Energy dissipation – Landscaping – Monitoring – Traffic protection DESIGN | Standard Details
  92. 92. • Used to generate metrics reports that PWD will upload to GreenIT metrics tracking database DESIGN | GreenIT Data Entry Application
  93. 93. • Survey & Drawing Standards • Geotechnical Testing Guidelines • Project Summaries Guidance Manual DESIGN | Other Resources
  94. 94. • Establish standards early in program • Keep talking, set-up feedback loops to improve upon standards • Consider existing use of site; community input can be a key factor in design decisions • Investigate site history and existing conditions thoroughly • Incorporate time in schedules for internal/external review times and changes from stakeholders • Set up regular coordination meetings with internal reviewing units and external reviewing agencies/partners DESIGN | Lessons Learned
  95. 95. GSI Maintenance
  96. 96. MAINTENANCE • Inspection: – Visual/photographic & video – Record condition of vegetative and structural features (pipes) • Maintenance: – Trash and sediment removal – Jetting and Vactoring – Weeding, pruning, etc. – New product testing – Structural repairs – Erosion control – Reseeding / Watering • Reporting: – Labor effort & materials – Defects • Creating Standards and Protocols: – Required tools & crew size – Frequency – Repairs
  97. 97. ASSET TRACKING 222 83 102 91 49 18 17 19 0 100 200 300 400 500 600 700 TotalNumberofSMPs FY17 Q4 Currently Maintained SMPs by Type Green Roof Basin Swale Pervious Paving Bumpout Planter Infiltration/Stora ge Trench Rain Garden Stormwater Tree Tree Trench n= 618 0 100 200 300 400 500 600 700 800 900 2010 2011 2012 2013 2014 2015 2016 2017 2018 SMP Count Projected 0 50000 100000 150000 200000 250000 300000 350000 400000 2010 2011 2012 2013 2014 2015 2016 2017 2018 Vegetated Area (ft2) Projected
  98. 98. MAINTENANCE MAPS | CityWorks
  99. 99. PHOTO POINTS | Vegetation and Seasonal Changes
  100. 100. INSPECTION PROGRAM
  101. 101. SUBSURFACE MAINTENANCE
  102. 102. DIVERSITY | Resources and Workforce
  103. 103. PowerCorpsPHL
  104. 104. Green Stormwater Infrastructure Partnerships City Agency Partnerships: • Streets • Parks • Vacant Land • City Facilities Non-City Partnerships: • Philadelphia School District • Philadelphia Housing Authority • SEPTA • Universities: Temple, Drexel, University of Pennsylvania
  105. 105. City Agency Partnerships: Green Streets • 125 Green Streets Complete • 175 Green Streets Underway • Tree trenches, stormwater planters, bumpouts, porous streets • Partners: Streets Department, Commerce, PennDOT, SEPTA, Planning Commission • Monthly Project Review • Quarterly Green Streets Coordination • Green Streets Maintenance MOU 2013 • Green Streets Design Manual 2014 GOALS:  Incorporate GSI into all City transportation investments  Joint transportation funding applications  Align capital planning, repaving, ADA ramps  Initiate pilot technologies (green gutter)
  106. 106. City Agency Partnerships: Green Streets Passayunk Avenue Lane Removal: FHWA Funded, 2013
  107. 107. City Agency Partnerships: Green Streets 58th Street Greenway : TIGER Funded, 2013
  108. 108. City Agency Partnerships: Green Streets Bartram’s Mile Greenway – 2.7 Greened Acres, 2017
  109. 109. Management of Private Runoff in Public SMPs – American Street Pilot Public ROW Drainage Areas Potential Private Drainage to Disconnect to ROW SMPs
  110. 110. City Agency Partnerships: Green Streets American Street : 30 Greened Acres, Construction 2018-2019 • Streets, Commerce, PennDOT, Planning Commission • $11+ Million Federal Transportation Funds • $5 M TIGER Grant / $1.325 M design fund match from PWD • Construction 2018-2019
  111. 111. City Agency Partnerships: Green Streets Porous Streets & Parking Lots
  112. 112. PROJECTS: • I-95 Stormwater Management Regulations • Penn’s Landing Cap Park GOALS:  Manage impervious surface from PennDOT highways as they undergo expansion  Gain PennDOT approval to develop GSI in state-owned city streets  Prioritize street reconstruction within the city for federal funding that includes stormwater management costs  Ensure maintenance of stormwater systems constructed to meet regulations Green Street Partnerships: PennDOT
  113. 113. 2014
  114. 114. • 12 Park Projects Complete • 40 Park Projects In Design • City Partners: Parks and Recreation, Dept Public Property • Non-Profit Partners: Fairmount Park Conservancy, Pennsylvania Horticultural Society, Trust for Public Land • GSI Maintenance MOU Drafted • Rebuild Partnership [City Soda Tax] GOALS:  Incorporate GSI into all City park investments; Maximize stormwater management on park properties  Work with non-profit partners to identify funding for non-GSI elements: play equipment, benches, lighting, etc  Ensure maintenance of stormater systems constructed to meet regulations City Agency Partnerships: Parks and Recreation
  115. 115. Herron Playground: Philadelphia Parks & Rec Renovation Partnership, 2012 City Agency Partnerships: Parks and Recreation
  116. 116. Liberty Lands Park: PWD-led Project, Community Owned & Maintained, 2011 City Agency Partnerships: Parks and Recreation
  117. 117. Ralph Brooks Park: Connor Barwin & Make the World Better Foundation, Urban Roots, Councilman Kenyatta Johnson, Mural Arts, 2015 City Agency Partnerships: Parks and Recreation
  118. 118. Wissinoming Park: PWD-led Project, 2016 City Agency Partnerships: Parks and Recreation
  119. 119. • 1 Projects Complete • 4 Projects in Design • Partners: Public Property, Art Museum, Philadelphia Free Library, Police Department, Fire Department, Prisons, Health, Fleet • City Facilities Maintenance MOU Drafted GOALS:  Incorporate GSI into all City facility investments; Maximize stormwater management on city facility property in parking lots and other open spaces  Ensure maintenance of stormater systems constructed to meet regulations City Agency Partnerships: City Facilities
  120. 120. Philadelphia Zoo – 2012-2014 City Agency Partnerships: City Facilities
  121. 121. • 5 Projects Complete • 8 Projects in Planning / Design • City Partners: City Council Dept Public Property, Redevelopment Authority, Philadelphia Land Bank • Non-Profit Partners: Neighborhood Gardens Trust, Local CDCs and Civics GOALS:  Identify stormwater management opportunities on vacant lots prioritized for permanent greening by communities and city council members  PWD-led projects that manage ROW runoff  Acquire MOUs with City Property to ensure permanency of GSI  Work with community groups for stewardship and maintenance of sites City Agency Partnerships: Vacant Lands
  122. 122. Heston Lot: City Council Partnership, 2016 City Agency Partnerships: Vacant Lands
  123. 123. City Agency Partnerships: Brownfield Sites  Partners: Commerce Department, Office of Sustainability, Farm Philly / Urban Ag, City Legal Counsel  Land Use History for parcel-based projecst: Sanborns, Zoning records  Industrial or other potential contaminant uses are further investigated  Former graveyards also a concern  EPA Brownfields Assessment Grant Effort  Urban Gardens  Vacant Lots for GSI  Potential future consideration for Brownfields Cleanup Grants  Excavation can assist in remediation
  124. 124. • 13 Grant-Funded Green Schools Complete • 5 Grant-Funded Schools in Design • 2 PWD-led Schools in Design • Partner: Philadelphia School District • Non-Profit Partners: Community Design Collaborative, Trust for Public Land, The Big Sandbox GOALS:  Provide grant funds for District and Partners to build GSI in schoolyards  Develop an easement agreement for PWD to build GSI in schoolyards that manages runoff from adjacent neighborhoods  Work with non-profit partners to identify funding for non-GSI elements: play equipment, benches, lighting, etc  Ensure maintenance of stormwater systems constructed to meet regs City Agency Partnerships: Green Schools
  125. 125. Green Schools Educational Programming
  126. 126. Partnership with Community Design Collaborative and Philadelphia School District www.cdesignc.org/schoolyards Green Schools Design Guide
  127. 127. Green Street Friends School: Grant-Funded, Community-Led, 2012 Green Schools
  128. 128. William Dick : Grant-Funded, Trust for Public Land, 2014 Green Schools
  129. 129. William Dick : Grant-Funded, Trust for Public Land, 2014 Green Schools
  130. 130. William Dick : Grant-Funded, Trust for Public Land, 2014 Green Schools
  131. 131. George Nebinger School: Grant-Funded, 2013 Green Schools
  132. 132. George Nebinger School: Grant-Funded, 2013 Green Schools
  133. 133. • 3 Green Streets Projects In Design • $30 Million Choice Neighborhoods Grant • Partner: Philadelphia Housing Authority • Additional Partners: Habitat for Humanity, City Division of Housing and Community Development, Local Developers GOALS:  Maximize stormwater management in new housing developments, including green streets.  Jointly pursue funds for housing development and redevelopment of low- income communities  Ensure maintenance of stormwater systems constructed to meet regs  Retrofit existing housing projects to manage stormwater City Agency Partnerships: Public Housing
  134. 134. 3RD & FAIRMOUNT RD GRANTS & LEVERAGED FUNDS  $10.8 MILLION STREETS  $3.3 MILLION SCHOOLS  $2.9 MILLION PARKS  $30 MILLION PUBLIC HOUSING  $2 MILLION GSI RESEARCH $49 MILLION TOTAL
  135. 135. • $47 million PWD investment + $60 million private • $1 million local tax revenue • $1.46 million local GSI industry • 14% increase GSI industry, 2013-14 • 1,430 local jobs each year Economic Impact of First 5 Years
  136. 136. You’re Ripping Up My Sidewalk for What?!You’re Ripping Up My Sidewalk For What?! Tiffany Ledesma Public Affairs Division Public Engagement Team
  137. 137. 1. GSI Notification & Outreach Process • Formal process for notifying communities about each GSI project • Primary goal is to inform. PWD provides a two-pronged approach 2. GSI Wrap-around Programming • Programs and tools that reach a broader audience • Primary goal is to inspire and help people take action Public Engagement Approach Overview
  138. 138. •Notify community •Attend meeting to solicit feedback Planning •Notify community •Attend meeting to solicit feedback •Environmental education in schools Design •Formal letter to residents, City Council and community leaders •Automated calls to residents •Attend meeting to provide construction notice Construction •Ribbon cuttings •Soak it Up Adoption •Continue education and partnership Post Construction GSI Notification Process
  139. 139. • Purpose: work with residents in their own backyards. • Example: • Rain Check – PWD offers funding for residents to install stormwater management Residential Programs Rain Check participant with new downspout planter. What’s in the Toolbox?
  140. 140. FREE Rain Barrels! Cost Share Downspout Planter Masonry (De-paving & Porous Paving) Rain Garden ~4,500 barrels distributed since 2006! More Info: www.phillywatersheds.org/raincheck What’s in the Toolbox?
  141. 141. • Purpose: engage with organized residents like civic associations or neighborhood groups for mutual benefits • Example: • Adoption Program Community Programs Soak it Up Adoption Training What’s in the Toolbox?
  142. 142. • Purpose: inspire and engage the public. • Examples: • Murals • Street art • Stormdrain markers Art & Interpretation What’s in the Toolbox?
  143. 143. Vinyl decals incorporated into outreach notification process • They reinforce each other • Engage different audiences • Wrap-around programming provides space for experimentation • Allows program flexibility and ability to scale Importance of a Two-part Approach
  144. 144. Perception - Green City, Clean Waters 1. Annual utility customer satisfaction surveys • Helps us find out city-wide results of our reach • About all projects, not just green infrastructure 2. Survey of partners and engaged customers • Analyze engagement through partners 3. Community meeting outreach surveys • Feedback about projects at community meetings • Longitudinal over a project 4. Focus Groups • Overall customer experience and satisfaction w/ PWD Supplements: • Focus Groups • Testimonials
  145. 145. Green City, Clean Waters Partner Survey (2016) • Methodology: pushed through partners • Makes PWD aware of people’s preference about GSI, what their concerns are about, and levels of awareness. • Future goals with this: over time, analyze opinions and perceptions of a more non-civically engaged audience 5. Where would you like to see Green Stormwater Infrastructure in your community? (Select all that apply) Schools Recreation Centers Parks Streets and Sidewalks Alleys Commercial / Shopping Districts Private Residential Parking Lots Vacant Land Other Yes 71.1% 64.8% 69.3% 71.8% 47.9% 57.2% 55.4% 62.8% 62.8% 7.2% No 28.9% 35.2% 30.7% 28.2% 52.1% 42.8% 44.6% 37.2% 40.2% 92.8% Perception
  146. 146. Perception Green City, Clean Waters Partner Survey (2016) 11% 21% 32% 19% 17% How familiar are you with Green Stormwater Infrastructure? Extremely Very Moderately Slightly Not at All 6% 2% 8% 28%56% How likely are you to support public investment in Green Stormwater Infrastructure if it resulted in improvements to the health of local rivers and watersheds? Very Unlikely Unlikely Neutral Likely Very Likely
  147. 147. Community Meeting Surveys • We frame these surveys to the public as taking public input and feedback, rather than evaluating our outreach efficacy Indicators  Familiarity of Green City, Clean Waters  Support of project  Concerns about project  Actual and preferred notification method  Call to action  Demographics  Additional questions & concerns (open ended response)
  148. 148. Using Survey Data 39% of community meeting attendees want to manage stormwater on their property Expansion of adoption program, coordination with GSI Maintenance team 50% of community meeting attendees are concerned about long term maintenance Integration of Rain Check program into community meeting presentation AND presenting projects at workshops
  149. 149. Perception: “Overall Customer Experience & Satisfaction with PWD” Focus Groups • Overall positive perception of PWD as a “public utility” as compared to other utilities/privatized companies: “Unlike other departments, the PWD believes in my quality of life. I think the PWD is changing the landscape and beautifying the city. Targeting issues where flooding is a problem.” -Focus Group participant Vinyl decals incorporated into outreach notification process Negative and positive responses listed. Relevant responses to GSI only listed under “positive.” • “Green City, Clean Waters” • “Transformation of vacant lots” • “Innovative projects • “People who work at PWD really care about the City” • Incentivize Rain Check (“give us a discount on water bill”)
  150. 150. Communications | Social Media Strategy Nearly Half of Americans Get News Online – and that number is growing 79% of internet users (68% of all U.S. adults) use Facebook Growing tool for neighborhood-level organizing Prevalence of inexpensive smart phones with web and social media: digital outreach can be effective in more communities
  151. 151. Communications | Social Media Strategy The Watersheds Blog: 2-3 Posts Per Week – creates custom content for social media + email communications Event Listings and Calendars: Building an online presence for events and meetings E-blasts and Newsletters: Approx. 14K subscribers + growing. Provides a direct line to most dedicated and invested residents/customers
  152. 152. Large and Growing Audience • Thousands of positive customer and partnership interactions each month • Twitter alone averages close to 100K impressions/month • Largely unpaid posts: no cost beyond staff time used to create messages • Can be increased + targeted with small advertising budget
  153. 153. Social Media Bottom line • Social media and web are accessible tools for reaching big audiences and people who might not get more traditional messages • We can set the tone which influences the messaging carried by leaders and influencers. • Can’t replace tools like flyers and phone calls or personal outreach, • Not the top tool for driving outreach, but already too important to ignore … and likely to become a bigger source of engagement • PWD is learning more all the time and investing more in a strong digital strategy
  154. 154. Thank you! Questions? tiffanyledesma@phila.gov Wo tem con if it
  155. 155. GSI Unit: Private Development Services
  156. 156. Regulatory Context PWD’s ability to establish regulations is through City Code  2006: Chapter 6 Regulations established  2011: Consent Order & Agreement signed  2015: Chapter 6 Regulation Update
  157. 157.  Project Applicability: Regulations are City-Wide • Development over 15,000 SF disturbance must manage stormwater on-site o 5,000 SF in Darby Cobbs o Wissahickon Overlay in Zoning Code  Technical Requirements  Review Process • Pre-requisite to L&I Permits  Construction and Inspection  Operation and Maintenance PWD Stormwater Regulations
  158. 158. Requirement: Infiltrate the first 1.5 inches of runoff from 100% of impervious surfaces Goal: Reduce flow to sewers and waterbodies Applicability: All development projects Water Quality Volume
  159. 159. Water Quality Rate Requirement: Detain and slowly release at 0.05 cfs/ac of impervious area Goal: Slow flow to treatment plants Applicability: Non-infiltrating SMPs in the combined sewer area
  160. 160. Water Quality Treatment Requirement: Treat 100% of impervious area through a pollutant reducing SMP Goal: Decrease mass of pollutants to waterways Applicability: Non-infiltrating SMPs
  161. 161. Flood Control: Reduce peak discharges below existing rates Applicability: Redevelopment projects, can be exempted with 20% reduction in impervious area Channel Protection: Detain and release the 1year storm Applicability: Projects over 1 acre, not in the Schuylkill or Delaware Public Health and Safety Rate: Detain and slowly release 1-10yr storms at very low rates Applicability: Select sewersheds
  162. 162. Resources  Stormwater Plan Review Website • Online ERSA Application and web-based Guidance Manual • General information about stormwater management • User login and project status information  Guidance Manual • Follows project life cycle from conceptual planning to post- construction maintenance • Content is fully searchable and links connect related information  Stormwater Tracking Database • Internal system tracking critical project information: applicability, project contacts, compliance data, and review status
  163. 163. Review Process Conceptual Review (5-day)  Online application and upload plans via website  Preliminary review of site layout, SWM strategy, and utility connections  Pre-requisite to the City Zoning Permit Technical Review (15-day)  Full engineering review, including E&S  Joint review with PADEP for >1 acre  Operation & Maintenance Agreement  Pre-requisite to the City Building Permit
  164. 164. Active Construction Inspection  Inspector assigned to each site  Pre-construction meeting to review sequencing, procedures, E&S  Must notify inspector before starting SMP construction  Submit Construction Certification Package for each SMP and related features  Enforcement with Notice of Violation and Stop Work Order
  165. 165. Project Closeout  Final inspection and walk-through • Project: property owner, engineer, and contractor • PWD: technical reviewer and inspector  Record Drawing  Verified project data  Encourage applicant to apply for credits
  166. 166. Post Construction Inspection  Inspect installed SMPs to ensure maintenance and functionality • Inspection frequencies align with PWD permit commitments • Perform outreach and education with property owner responsible for maintenance • Monitor systems to evaluate performance and design standards  Enforcement mechanisms to ensure compliance  Regular maintenance is a requirement of O&M Agreement and to continue credit on stormwater bill
  167. 167. GSI Unit: Stormwater Billing & Incentives
  168. 168. Parcel Based Billing for Stormwater www.phillystormwater.org  Residential properties charged uniform monthly charge  Non-Residential and Condominium properties charged based on Gross Area and Impervious Area measurements for the parcel
  169. 169. Stormwater Credits  Private properties with maintained SMPs are eligible for stormwater credits • Non-residential only • Includes development and voluntary retrofit projects  PWD offers up to 80% credit for the management of 1” of stormwater  Approximately 250 properties currently receiving credits  Credits must be renewed every 4 years • Recommended annual inspection by qualified professional • Required every 4 years with renewal application
  170. 170. Stormwater Management Incentives www.phila.gov/swgrants
  171. 171. SMIP & GARP Grants  PWD in partnership with PIDC provides money to • Non-residential property owners for design and construction of SWM project (SMIP) • Companies or project developers to design and build SWM across multiple properties in combined sewer (GARP)  Owners/customers receive stormwater fee credits  PWD receives property interest for 45 years  Owners must maintain stormwater projects to continue receiving credits and as condition of receiving grant funds
  172. 172. Why does PWD offer grants? • Direct response to impacted customers • Helps PWD with Greened Acre targets outlined in CO&A • PWD and customer can share the costs of stormwater management • Grant can cover design and construction costs What projects are eligible? • Non-residential properties NOT owned by City, State or Federal government • Stormwater Retrofit projects OR Development projects <15,000 SF OR those that go ‘above and beyond’ regulation requirements SMIP and GARP Grant Programs Cardone Industries, 5401 Whitaker Avenue
  173. 173. 58 awards • 14 GARP sites • 44 SMIP sites $30.5 million awarded • $13.5 million GARP • $17 million SMIP 372 acres managed Both programs focus on cost- efficient projects that maximize return to the customer and PWD. Ribbon cutting at W&W Realty, 2001 N. 59th Street SMIP and GARP Grant Programs Summary to Date
  174. 174. • It’s possible for a project subject to the Regulations to also receive grant funding, e.g. Settlement Music School • Project is assigned one reviewer (from Plan Review staff) with guidance from Credits staff as needed • Project held to regulatory standards and must meet requirements of Stormwater Management Guidance Manual SMIP + Development Projects Settlement Music School, 6128 Germantown Avenue
  175. 175. • Located in Germantown • Required to meet Regulations for area within the limit of disturbance (entire site except for existing building) • Awarded $140,000 to manage runoff from additional impervious area (existing building, Germantown Ave, surrounding residential properties) • SMPs include Porous Asphalt and Bioretention • Additional Savings ~$2,000 per year SMIP + Development Projects Settlement Music School Example

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