The Campus as a Place of Learning     – New Learning Spaces               Professor Mike Keppell     Director, The Flexibl...
OverviewDistributed spacesEcological universityPrinciplesDiversity of spacesAligning with curriculum                      ...
Distributed SpacesGrowing acceptance that learning occurs in different‘places’Proliferation of approaches emerging includi...
Barnett, R. (2011). Being auniversity. New York:Routledge.4
Ecological UniversityGlobal connectedness and dependence on world aroundthemInstead of ‘having an impact’ on the world whi...
Higher Education Principles       Access and Equity &                                          ethical obligationsEquivale...
Key principle    throughout the    presentation is        ‘design’7
Learning SpacesPhysical, blended or virtual ‘areas’ that:  enhance learning  that motivate learners  promote authentic lea...
Distributed Learning                           Spaces         Physical              Blended                VirtualFormal  ...
Seven Principles of       Learning Space DesignThe SKG project has established seven principles oflearning space which sup...
Seven Principles of Learning Space                  Design4 Equity: consideration of the needs of cultural and physical di...
Albury-Wodonga Learning Commons               12
Comfort     Aesthetics         Flow        Equity      Blending     Affordances     Repurposing13
Wallenberg Hall - Stanford University                  14
Comfort      Aesthetics          Flow         Equity       Blending      Affordances     Repurposing15
MIT – STATA Center - EDDY Spaces               16
Technology-enhanced Active Learning (TEAL) Centre              Affordances - Blending                        17
Discipline     Pedagogies      ‘Plasma to     Chalkboard’     for Physics     Professors18
Affordances     19
20
Virtual Learning SpacesVirtual learning spaces provide unique opportunitiesthat are unavailable in physical learning space...
Formal Virtual         Informal VirtualLearning Spaces        Learning Spaces                  22
23
Flexible learning“Flexible learning” provides opportunities toimprove the student learning experience throughflexibility i...
Blended & Flexible Learning“Blended and flexible learning” is a design approachthat examines the relationships between fle...
Mobile Learning SpacesWith its strong emphasis on learning rather thanteaching, mobile learning challenges educators to tr...
Academic Learning SpacesPhysical, blended or virtual ‘areas’ that:enhance academic ‘work’that motivate academic ‘work’enab...
Academic SpacesBarnett (2011) suggests that “today’s university livesamid multiple time-spans, and time-speeds” (p.74).Con...
Academic SpacesUniversities may needto be conscious of the24/7 existence oftheir students acrossthe globe, each in theirow...
Academic SpacesBarnett (2011) suggests that academics may be activein university spaces that may include:Intellectual and ...
Academic SpacesPedagogical and curricular space focuses onthe spaces available to trial new pedagogicalapproaches and new ...
32
33
34
Personal Learning SpacesPersonal learning environments (PLE) integrateformal and informal learning spacesCustomised by the...
ConnectivismPLE may also require new ways of learning asknowledge has changed to networks and ecologies(Siemens, 2006).The...
37
38
Outdoor Learning Spaces•   These pathways, thoroughfares    and occasional rest areas are    generally given a functional ...
40
41
42
Putting it   alltogether             43
ConclusionA global revolution is taking place in tertiary education.The traditional concept of the lecture room is beingre...
Further InformationSKG Report:http://documents.skgproject.com/skg-final-report.pdfBook Chapter:http://www.slideshare.net/m...
46
Upcoming SlideShare
Loading in …5
×

New Campus Spaces

694 views

Published on

Invited presentation at student centred campuses conference in May 2012

Published in: Education
0 Comments
1 Like
Statistics
Notes
  • Be the first to comment

No Downloads
Views
Total views
694
On SlideShare
0
From Embeds
0
Number of Embeds
1
Actions
Shares
0
Downloads
20
Comments
0
Likes
1
Embeds 0
No embeds

No notes for slide

New Campus Spaces

  1. 1. The Campus as a Place of Learning – New Learning Spaces Professor Mike Keppell Director, The Flexible Learning Institute & Professor of Higher Education Charles Sturt University 1
  2. 2. OverviewDistributed spacesEcological universityPrinciplesDiversity of spacesAligning with curriculum 2
  3. 3. Distributed SpacesGrowing acceptance that learning occurs in different‘places’Proliferation of approaches emerging including‘flexible’, ‘open’, ‘distance’ and ‘off-campus’ that assistthe ubiquity of learning in a wide range ofcontexts (Lea & Nicholl, 2002).Growing acceptance of life-long and life-widelearning. 3
  4. 4. Barnett, R. (2011). Being auniversity. New York:Routledge.4
  5. 5. Ecological UniversityGlobal connectedness and dependence on world aroundthemInstead of ‘having an impact’ on the world which can beboth positive and negative ecological universities seeksustainabilityThey adopt a ‘care for the world’ as opposed to an‘impact on the world’ approach (Barnett, 2011). 5
  6. 6. Higher Education Principles Access and Equity & ethical obligationsEquivalence of Learning Outcomes traverses physical, blended and Student Learning Experience virtual learning spaces. ‘place’ of learning is diverse learning outcomes, subject, Constructive Alignment degree program, generic attributes Discipline Pedagogies specific needs of disciplines 6
  7. 7. Key principle throughout the presentation is ‘design’7
  8. 8. Learning SpacesPhysical, blended or virtual ‘areas’ that: enhance learning that motivate learners promote authentic learning interactionsSpaces where both teachers and studentsoptimize the perceived and actualaffordances of the space (Keppell & Riddle,2012). 8
  9. 9. Distributed Learning Spaces Physical Blended VirtualFormal Informal Formal Informal Mobile Personal Academic Professional Outdoor Practice 9
  10. 10. Seven Principles of Learning Space DesignThe SKG project has established seven principles oflearning space which support a collaborative andstudent-centred  approach to learning:Comfort: a space which creates a physical and mentalsense of ease and well-beingAesthetics: pleasure which includes the recognition ofsymmetry, harmony, simplicity and fitness for purposeFlow: the state of mind felt by the learner when totallyinvolved in the learning experience 10
  11. 11. Seven Principles of Learning Space Design4 Equity: consideration of the needs of cultural and physical differences5 Blending: a mixture of technological and face-to-face pedagogical resources6 Affordances: the “action possibilities” the learning environment provides the users, including such things as kitchens, natural light, wifi, private spaces, writing surfaces, sofas, and so on.7 Repurposing: the potential for multiple usage of a space (Souter, Riddle, Keppell, 2010) (http://www.skgproject.com) 11
  12. 12. Albury-Wodonga Learning Commons 12
  13. 13. Comfort Aesthetics Flow Equity Blending Affordances Repurposing13
  14. 14. Wallenberg Hall - Stanford University 14
  15. 15. Comfort Aesthetics Flow Equity Blending Affordances Repurposing15
  16. 16. MIT – STATA Center - EDDY Spaces 16
  17. 17. Technology-enhanced Active Learning (TEAL) Centre Affordances - Blending 17
  18. 18. Discipline Pedagogies ‘Plasma to Chalkboard’ for Physics Professors18
  19. 19. Affordances 19
  20. 20. 20
  21. 21. Virtual Learning SpacesVirtual learning spaces provide unique opportunitiesthat are unavailable in physical learning spacesThese affordances or ‘action possibilities’ allow aricher range of learning interactions 21
  22. 22. Formal Virtual Informal VirtualLearning Spaces Learning Spaces 22
  23. 23. 23
  24. 24. Flexible learning“Flexible learning” provides opportunities toimprove the student learning experience throughflexibility in time, pace, place, mode of study,teaching approach, forms of assessment andstaffing. 24
  25. 25. Blended & Flexible Learning“Blended and flexible learning” is a design approachthat examines the relationships between flexiblelearning opportunities, in order to optimisestudent engagement and equivalence in learningoutcomes regardless of mode of study (Keppell, 2010,p. 3). 25
  26. 26. Mobile Learning SpacesWith its strong emphasis on learning rather thanteaching, mobile learning challenges educators to tryto understand learners’ needs.Understanding how learning takes place beyondthe classroom, andIntersection of education, life, work andleisure” (Kukulska-Hulme, 2010, p.181). 26
  27. 27. Academic Learning SpacesPhysical, blended or virtual ‘areas’ that:enhance academic ‘work’that motivate academic ‘work’enable networkingSpaces where academics optimize the perceived andactual affordances of the space. 27
  28. 28. Academic SpacesBarnett (2011) suggests that “today’s university livesamid multiple time-spans, and time-speeds” (p.74).Constant email...Committee meetings......Historians who focus on the pastResearchers who may focus on the future 28
  29. 29. Academic SpacesUniversities may needto be conscious of the24/7 existence oftheir students acrossthe globe, each in theirown unique time-span.Virtual spacesResidential students 29
  30. 30. Academic SpacesBarnett (2011) suggests that academics may be activein university spaces that may include:Intellectual and discursive space which focus onthe contribution to the wider public sphere.Epistemological space which focuses on the“space available for academics to pursue their ownresearch interests” (p. 76). 30
  31. 31. Academic SpacesPedagogical and curricular space focuses onthe spaces available to trial new pedagogicalapproaches and new curricular initiatives.Ontological space which focuses on ‘academicbeing’ which is becoming increasingly multi-facetedbeyond the research, teaching and communitycommitments. In fact “the widening ofuniversities’ ontological spaces may bringboth peril and liberation” (p. 77). 31
  32. 32. 32
  33. 33. 33
  34. 34. 34
  35. 35. Personal Learning SpacesPersonal learning environments (PLE) integrateformal and informal learning spacesCustomised by the individual to suit their needs andallow them to create their own identities.A PLE recognises ongoing learning and the needfor tools to support life-long and life-wide learning. 35
  36. 36. ConnectivismPLE may also require new ways of learning asknowledge has changed to networks and ecologies(Siemens, 2006).The implications of this change is that improved linesof communication need to occur.“Connectivism is the assertion that learning isprimarily a network-forming process” (p. 15). 36
  37. 37. 37
  38. 38. 38
  39. 39. Outdoor Learning Spaces• These pathways, thoroughfares and occasional rest areas are generally given a functional value in traffic management and are more often than not developed as an after thought in campus design. As such the thoroughfares and rest areas are under valued (or not recognized) as important spaces for teaching and learning (Rafferty, 2012). 39
  40. 40. 40
  41. 41. 41
  42. 42. 42
  43. 43. Putting it alltogether 43
  44. 44. ConclusionA global revolution is taking place in tertiary education.The traditional concept of the lecture room is beingredefined as digital and distance educationbecomes the "new normal" (Mark Brown, DominionPost).It is time that we begin changing our thinking about the‘place’ of learning for both learners and staff.We need to let go of the tradition of universities asbeing a ‘singular place’ where learning and teachingoccurs.Distributed learning spaces are the future. 44
  45. 45. Further InformationSKG Report:http://documents.skgproject.com/skg-final-report.pdfBook Chapter:http://www.slideshare.net/mkeppell/distributed-spaces-for-learningMike’s Blog:http://mike-keppell.blogspot.com.au/ 45
  46. 46. 46

×