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Homemade PowerPoint Gamesin a High School Science Setting    Jason Siko    Michael Barbour    Sacip Toker    Wayne State U...
Homemade PowerPoint Game      Student-generated game using MS       PowerPoint      Can be self-contained within .ppt fi...
Story         ORE BURSTGame DirectionsGame Preparation  Game Pieces Play the game                   A Homemade PowerPoint ...
Game Preparation   Game board: Print out slides 37-38, cut off the    edges, then tape together   Game Pieces: Print out...
Justifications for use   Constructionism       Learning by building       Creation of meaningful artifact   Microtheme...
ORE BURST!  HURRY!!!! Be the first to get you and your equipment to themining spot before your competitors. You and your w...
Time to play Ore Burst!     1         2          3              4      5     6         7          8              9      10...
If zinc’s atomic number is 30 and it has31 neutrons how many protons does ithave?    31            61            30
Prior Research   Parker (2004)       Middle school grammar – showed pre/post gains, but not        as much as control  ...
MethodologyIn this study we set out to answer the following research questions:     Do students reviewing for a chemistry...
Methodology   Two 50-question unit tests   t-test between control and treatment groups   ANOVA to compare performance o...
Setting   Large Midwestern suburban high school   Environmental Chemistry course (ACS    ChemCom curriculum)   Trimeste...
SettingTable 1Distribution of Control and Treatment Groups Among Teachers A-C                                       Unit 1...
Results   Do students reviewing for a chemistry test    by generating homemade PowerPoint    games perform better on mult...
Results   First Unit Test: (t = 3.069, p = 0.87)
Results   Second Unit Test: (t = -2.114, p < 0.05)
Results   Do students who have used this technique    more than once perform better than those    who have never construc...
Results   Results of ANOVA (F = 2.286, p = 0.106)
Discussion   First statistically significant result with    homemade PowerPoint games   Largest sample size to date   M...
Implications   For practitioners:       More time than traditional review       Boundaries on file size, narratives    ...
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AECT 2010 - Homemade PowerPoint Games in a High School Science Setting

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Siko, J. P., Barbour, M. K., & Toker, S. (2010, October). Homemade PowerPoint games in a high school science setting. A paper presented at the annual convention of the Association for Educational Communication and Technology, Anaheim, CA.

This study examined the use of homemade PowerPoint games in a secondary environmental chemistry classroom, comparing the performance on two unit tests between a control group and a group that created PowerPoints games. Results were mixed; with no significant difference in performance on one unit test and students who designed the games performed significantly better on the other unit test. There was also an increase effect for students who created games for both tests.

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AECT 2010 - Homemade PowerPoint Games in a High School Science Setting

  1. 1. Homemade PowerPoint Gamesin a High School Science Setting Jason Siko Michael Barbour Sacip Toker Wayne State University
  2. 2. Homemade PowerPoint Game  Student-generated game using MS PowerPoint  Can be self-contained within .ppt file or have a printable game board and piecesTemplate can be found at: http://it.coe.uga.edu/wwild/pptgames/
  3. 3. Story ORE BURSTGame DirectionsGame Preparation Game Pieces Play the game A Homemade PowerPoint Objectives Game By Credits Clarkston high schoolCopyright Notice
  4. 4. Game Preparation Game board: Print out slides 37-38, cut off the edges, then tape together Game Pieces: Print out slide 5 Need Dice Home Page
  5. 5. Justifications for use Constructionism  Learning by building  Creation of meaningful artifact Microtheme narratives  Concise narratives focus thoughts and ideas Question-writing  Process of writing questions, determining answer, & creating plausible alternatives forces students to analyze and synthesize content  With practice, students write higher-order questions
  6. 6. ORE BURST! HURRY!!!! Be the first to get you and your equipment to themining spot before your competitors. You and your workersare competing with three other mining companies. You havejust heard that in the state of Nebraska they have comeacross a large amount of ore. They are letting anyone comeand retrieve it from the ground for a cheap price and thequantity is unlimited. You want to be the first group to get toNebraska to claim where you are going to dig and retrieveyour share of the ore. Along the way you are traveling you willencounter some tough times where you are stopped andpossibly sent back home. So don’t wait and get the move on! Home Page
  7. 7. Time to play Ore Burst! 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 Home Page Game Directions
  8. 8. If zinc’s atomic number is 30 and it has31 neutrons how many protons does ithave? 31 61 30
  9. 9. Prior Research Parker (2004)  Middle school grammar – showed pre/post gains, but not as much as control Barbour et al. (2007)  U.S. History – NSD Clesson, Adams, & Barbour (2007)  British Literature – NSD Barbour et al. (2009)  Analysis of questions from Barbor et al (2007) study  ~93% of questions “Knowledge”-level
  10. 10. MethodologyIn this study we set out to answer the following research questions: Do students reviewing for a chemistry test by generating homemade PowerPoint games perform better on multiple- choice tests than students who use a traditional worksheet review guide? Do students who have used this technique more than once perform better than those who have never constructed homemade PowerPoint games or have only constructed games once?For these two research questions, we developed the following hypotheses: Ho: No difference in student performance H1: A positive difference in student performance
  11. 11. Methodology Two 50-question unit tests t-test between control and treatment groups ANOVA to compare performance of students who made games for both units, one unit, or not at all
  12. 12. Setting Large Midwestern suburban high school Environmental Chemistry course (ACS ChemCom curriculum) Trimester system 3 Teachers
  13. 13. SettingTable 1Distribution of Control and Treatment Groups Among Teachers A-C Unit 1 Unit 2Trimester Control Treatment Control Treatment1st A – 2 sections (n = 37) B – 2 sections (n = 44) C – 1 section (n = 20)2nd A – 3 sections B – 2 sections (n = 62) (n = 37)3rd B – 2 sections A – 4 sections (n = 32) (n = 69)
  14. 14. Results Do students reviewing for a chemistry test by generating homemade PowerPoint games perform better on multiple-choice tests than students who use a traditional worksheet review guide?
  15. 15. Results First Unit Test: (t = 3.069, p = 0.87)
  16. 16. Results Second Unit Test: (t = -2.114, p < 0.05)
  17. 17. Results Do students who have used this technique more than once perform better than those who have never constructed homemade PowerPoint games or have only constructed games once?
  18. 18. Results Results of ANOVA (F = 2.286, p = 0.106)
  19. 19. Discussion First statistically significant result with homemade PowerPoint games Largest sample size to date More higher-order questions (based on observation only; research ongoing)
  20. 20. Implications For practitioners:  More time than traditional review  Boundaries on file size, narratives  Spend more time on questions; less in lab Further research:  Continued analysis of questions  Does review = constructionism?  Project grade vs. Test grade

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