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I have a confession to make.
I was asked to come here today because
people have come to think of me as the
methods girl, a...
This is my hometown - westchester
meeyame
Where my most exhilarating memory is
playing an ersatz game of frogger
as i tigh...
This was life
This was work
This was play
So in the end, we identified 241 items
and after reliability testing, 162 ended
up in the original IMI.
It was GREAT! We h...
But even before the ink was dry on the IMI, I met a group of “urban brokers” –
renegades – from Houston that wanted to tel...
Rockport (shoe company) advertisement
80%
OF 18-34
SURVEYED WANT
TO LIVE IN
WALKABLE
NEIGHBORHOODS
YEAR
OLDS
40%
W I T H I
N OF DAILY
GOODS &
SERVICES1
WANT TO ...
172% Retail Sales
3 YearsDumbo
Brooklyn, NY
5-8%Commercial
Values
$700 - $3k
For-sale
Residential
Premiums
Property values within
walking distance of
public transit stations
are 40% higher than
other properties in the
same region.
Residential values in
walkable neighborhoods
experienced less than
half the average decline
in value from the
housing peak...
 Residential values more stable in walkable neighborhoods
 Have experienced less than half the average decline in
value ...
Municipal Property Tax Yield (per acre)
in Raleigh, NC, 2011
$2,078
$2,837
$22,175
$26,098
$30,057
$110,461
Walmart
Single...
Mixed Use Development vs. Sprawl
141
AVERAGE WALKSCORE OF
US
CITIESWITH POPULATIONS OVER
200K
When you aggregate what that means in terms
of going from the lowest to the highest level of
State of Place, the numbers a...
And then came Brookings! I finally
had the opportunity to truly tie built
environment features not just to
walking, health...
Very Low
State of Place™ Index
Tied to Economic Value
0 - 20 Low
Moderate
Good
Very
Good21 - 40
41 - 60
61 - 80
81 -
100
*...
When you aggregate what that means in terms
of going from the lowest to the highest level of
State of Place, the numbers a...
And all in all, these premiums have serious
implications for economic development in
terms of retail and property tax base...
Existing:
$14.59 Avg. Retail Rent/sq. ft.
$17.17 Avg. Office Rent/ sq. ft.
Potential:
$30.18 Retail Rents
$31.81 Office Re...
HOUSTON
Existing:
$124B Total Retail Sales
8.25% Houston Tax Rate
$10.2B Tax Revenues
Potential
(Two level increase):
$282...
TM
280+
URBAN
DESIGN
FEATURES
TOUCH,
SEE &
FEEL
WALKABILIT
Y
FROM
ARCADES
TO
ZEBRA STRIPES
TRAINING
VIDEO
+
INTERACTIVE
QUIZ
TRAINED COMMUNITY
MEMBERS OR STAFF
COLLECT DATA
MINUTES/B
L O C K
10-15
STATE OF
PLACE A...
0% 20% 40% 60% 80% 100%
DENSITY
FORM
CONNECTIVIT
Y
PROXIMITY
PARKS & PUBLIC
SPACES
RECREATIONAL FACILITIES
PEDESTRIAN & BI...
For Density, we are measuring building
compactness and height, not so much
population density – this is particularly
impor...
Related to that is Urban Form. Here we are
measuring streetscape continuity, so we take
into account building setbacks, ho...
CONNECTIVITY
Access &
Barriers
Proximity refers to the diversity of the land use
mix – the number of non-residential land uses
there are to walk to. So l...
With parks and public spaces, we include the
presence hard and soft scape public spaces, as
well as their quality and acce...
We also look at recreational facilities –
separately. This is getting a bit more at
recreational walking, but the literatu...
Pedestrian and bike amenities refer to aspects
of the built environment that make it
comfortable or pleasant to be a pedes...
Along with that, we look at traffic safety. Here
we are mainly focusing on the quality and
safety of the intersection as w...
Aesthetics goes beyond the visually pleasing; it
also includes aspects of urban design that
make places more dynamic and i...
Finally, personal safety refers not to actual
crime data but rather the aspects of the built
environment that influence ou...
Identify Priorities
State of Place Index
State of Place Profiles
Scenario Analysis
Run Analytics
Platform conducts “multi-criterion assessment” to
identify top priorities.
Example, Walkability as a Goal:
Dimension Perfo...
Identify Priorities
State of Place Index
State of Place Profiles
Scenario Analysis
Run Analytics
Compare Interventions
See Recommendations
Compare Projects
Choose Dimensions To Compare
Density
Form
Connectivity
Proximity
Parks & Public Spaces
Recreational Facilities
Pedestrian ...
Parks &
Public Spaces
$80,000
Pedestrian & Bicyclist
Amenities
Traffic
Safety
Add Park
Add Plaza
New PlazaPark Maintenance...
Com. property tax
For-sale residential
Office rents
Retail rents
Residential rents
Res. property taxes
Vacancy Rates
Retai...
Parks &
Public Spaces
$80,000
Pedestrian & Bicyclist
Amenities
Traffic
Safety
$300,000 $150,000
$1.09/sf $0.89/sf
Park Mai...
Parks &
Public Spaces
$80,000
Pedestrian & Bicyclist
Amenities
Traffic
Safety
$300,000 $150,000
$1.09/sf $0.89/sf
Park Mai...
Compare Interventions
See Recommendations
Compare Projects
Enter Project Cost Enter Project Cost
Enter Project Information
Neighborhood 1
$1,800,000
Neighborhood 1 Neighborhood 1
Pr...
Com. property tax
For-sale residential
Office rents
Retail rents
Residential rents
Res. property taxes
Vacancy Rates
Retai...
Neighborhood 1
$1,800,000
Neighborhood 1 Neighborhood 1
$2,700,000 $2,300,000
$1.43/sf $0.99/sf
Project 1 Project 2 Projec...
We are doing this currently for one of our
clients who is managing a $30M equity fund
focusing on underserved neighborhood...
TM
mariela@stateofplace.org
www.stateofplace.org
For full demo: bit.ly/DemoSoP
Improving Houston's State of Place: The Economic Case for Making Houston more Walkable
Improving Houston's State of Place: The Economic Case for Making Houston more Walkable
Improving Houston's State of Place: The Economic Case for Making Houston more Walkable
Improving Houston's State of Place: The Economic Case for Making Houston more Walkable
Improving Houston's State of Place: The Economic Case for Making Houston more Walkable
Improving Houston's State of Place: The Economic Case for Making Houston more Walkable
Improving Houston's State of Place: The Economic Case for Making Houston more Walkable
Improving Houston's State of Place: The Economic Case for Making Houston more Walkable
Improving Houston's State of Place: The Economic Case for Making Houston more Walkable
Improving Houston's State of Place: The Economic Case for Making Houston more Walkable
Improving Houston's State of Place: The Economic Case for Making Houston more Walkable
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Improving Houston's State of Place: The Economic Case for Making Houston more Walkable

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Dr. Alfonzo’s presentation will describe how State of Place, an urban data analytics platform helps both public and private entities understand how to make economic investments in walkability that will pay off in the marketplace.
Walkability is increasingly tied to both emerging market preferences and business success. Some 80% of Millenials want to live in walkable places and in 2011 58% of venture capital in the Top 5 U.S. markets went to firms located in walkable areas.
Yet walkability seems out of reach in many American cities – especially Houston. Two key barriers account for this difficulty. First, stakeholders often lack mechanisms by which to identify the most effective interventions or investments, especially in light of fiscal constraints. Second, and perhaps more pressing, stakeholders find it difficult to communicate and justify the benefits – especially economic benefits – of walkability.
Dr. Alfonzo’s presentation will show how data-driven storytelling can pave the road for people-first urban design, even in face of auto-dominated landscapes like Houston.

Published in: Data & Analytics
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Improving Houston's State of Place: The Economic Case for Making Houston more Walkable

  1. 1. I have a confession to make. I was asked to come here today because people have come to think of me as the methods girl, a data geek, a methodholic. But actually, I'm a placeoholic Methods, data, definition, rationalism, are just my drugs of choice I use to feed my place addiction I very much embrace the notion that If you cannot measure it, it doesn't exist but not for the sake of measurement itself' but for the sake of changing it for the sake of convincing other people to change it for the sake of communicating the value of urban design But I didn't start out this way. Improving Houston’s The Economic Case for Making Houston more Walkable TM Mariela Alfonzo, Ph.D. Founder, State of Place TM Research Assistant Professor, NYU Rice Kinder Institute April 13th, 2015
  2. 2. This is my hometown - westchester meeyame Where my most exhilarating memory is playing an ersatz game of frogger as i tightroped down pencil thin sidewalks dogging cars as I crossed strip-mall lined highways masquerading as streets all to get to a chicken teriyaki sub. Growing up in Miami - especially as a carless teenager sucked.
  3. 3. This was life
  4. 4. This was work
  5. 5. This was play
  6. 6. So in the end, we identified 241 items and after reliability testing, 162 ended up in the original IMI. It was GREAT! We had done it. We had measured urban design! BUT We had built a tool for measurements sake. I’ve since fielded dozens of calls from researchers and practitioners asking us how to use this thing – and as the grad student on the project, I was really the only one who knew what to do with it! IRVINE MINNESOTA INVENTORY Date 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 Time Observer Segment # Answer questions 1-6 based on this end of the segment Intersection Neighborhood Identification 1. Are there monuments or markers including neighborhood entry signs that indicate that one is entering a special district or area? 1 yes = 1; no = 0 Street Crossing 2a. Consider the places on the segment that are intended for pedestrians to cross the street. Are these places marked for pedestrian crossing? Mark N/A if there are no intended places to cross. 2 all = 2; some = 1; none = 0; NA = 8 2b. What type of marking do the crosswalks have? Mark all that apply. Mark N/A if 2a= 0 or 8 White painted lines 3 yes = 1; no = 0; NA = 8 Colored painted lines 4 yes = 1; no = 0; NA = 8 Zebra striping 5 yes = 1; no = 0; NA = 8 Different road surface or paving (e.g. tiles, colored concrete, marble, etc) 6 yes = 1; no = 0; NA = 8 Other 7 yes = 1; no = 0; NA = 8 3. Are there curb cuts at all places where crossing is expected to occur? Mark N/A if there are no intended places to cross. 8 all = 2; some = 1; none = 0; NA = 8 4. What type of traffic/pedestrian signal(s)/system(s) is/are provided? Mark all that apply. Traffic signal 9 yes = 1; no = 0 Stop sign 10 yes = 1; no = 0 Yield sign 11 yes = 1; no = 0 Pedestrian activated signal 12 yes = 1; no = 0 Pedestrian crossing sign 13 yes = 1; no = 0 Pedestrian overpass/underpass/bridge 14 yes = 1; no = 0 5. For an individual who is on this segment, how safe (traffic wise) do you think it is to cross the street from this segment? 15 pretty/very safe = 1; not very safe/ unsafe = 0; cul de sac = 8 6. For an individual who is on this segment, how convenient (traffic wise) do you think it is to cross the street from this segment? 16 pretty/very convenient =1; not very/inconvenient= 0; cul de sac = 8 Answer questions 7-11 while standing at the beginning of the segment Neighborhood Identification 7. Does the segment have banners that identify the neighborhood? 17 some/a lot = 2; few = 1; none = 0 Street Characteristics 8a. Is this a pedestrianized street? 18 yes = 1; no = 0 8b. Is the street a … 19 one way = 1; two way = 2 9. Is this segment an alley? 20 yes = 1; no = 0 10. How many vehicle lanes are there for cars? (Include turning lanes). 21 six or more = 6; five = 5; four = 4; three = 3; two = 2; one = 1; NA (no lanes for car travel) = 8 Views 11a. Is this segment characterized by having a significant open view of an object or scene that is not on the segment? The view must be a prominent one. 22 yes = 1; no = 0 11b. How attractive is the open view? 23 attractive = 3; neutral = 2; unattractive = 1; NA (no views) = 8 Begin walking along segment to answer questions 12-68 12a. What types of land uses are present on this area? Mark all that apply. Residential Single family home - detached 24 yes = 1; no = 0 Single family home/duplex - attached (2 units or fewer) 25 yes = 1; no = 0 Town home/condo/apartment housing (3 units or more) 26 yes = 1; no = 0 Mobile homes (includes manufactured homes) 27 yes = 1; no = 0 Residential, other 28 yes = 1; no = 0
  7. 7. But even before the ink was dry on the IMI, I met a group of “urban brokers” – renegades – from Houston that wanted to tell the story of place, or lack of thereof in their case. They planned to rank several neighborhoods in Houston based on their sense of place. As the purported methods girl, I asked them how they planned to do that. They had no clue – they were planning to have a group of “experts” subjectively judge these places. Enter light bulb moment – so hey, I have this tool… I was forced to come up with a quick and dirty methodology – the very first version of my State of Place algorithm (which I’ll get to later) – to use the IMI to tell a story about neighborhoods' Sense of Place! We gave each of the 12 neighborhoods grades and everything. In 2005! Now I really thought I had my eureka moment…we thought this would incite these neighborhoods to think about Place, to compete on the basis on Place. But again, this was 10 years ago. Even if we had begun to define the nuts and bolts of great places It couldn’t just be about health. It couldn’t just be about sense of place. I STILL had to show them the money if I wanted them to consider place in the equation. I realized I had to learn a whole new language – and method. The language of real estate economics and finance. I audited a real estate development class, jumped feet first into an intense relationship with the Urban Land Institute, got countless headaches from trying to figure out all of the jargon and oh my God, the acronyms. If you think we urban planners and designers have acronyms. Wow.
  8. 8. Rockport (shoe company) advertisement
  9. 9. 80% OF 18-34 SURVEYED WANT TO LIVE IN WALKABLE NEIGHBORHOODS YEAR OLDS 40% W I T H I N OF DAILY GOODS & SERVICES1 WANT TO LIVE > 50 YRS OLD MI 5 INVESTMENT M A R K E T S 58% IN TOP VC OF CAPITAL W E N T T OCE NTE R CI TY O R WALKABLE SUBURBS
  10. 10. 172% Retail Sales 3 YearsDumbo Brooklyn, NY
  11. 11. 5-8%Commercial Values $700 - $3k For-sale Residential Premiums
  12. 12. Property values within walking distance of public transit stations are 40% higher than other properties in the same region.
  13. 13. Residential values in walkable neighborhoods experienced less than half the average decline in value from the housing peak in the mid 2000s
  14. 14.  Residential values more stable in walkable neighborhoods  Have experienced less than half the average decline in value from the housing peak  A 10pt increase in Walk Score linked to 5-8% increase in commercial values  A 1pt increase in Walk Score linked to $700-$3000 for-sale residential premiums  Avg. operating cost /yr., Bike: $308  Avg. operating cost/yr. Car: $8,220  Urban mixed-use developments generate 25-59x revenue/acre than suburban counterparts  1% rise in urban sprawl index increases obesity risk by 0.5%  In 2008, medical $$ to treat obesity in US, approx. $147B
  15. 15. Municipal Property Tax Yield (per acre) in Raleigh, NC, 2011 $2,078 $2,837 $22,175 $26,098 $30,057 $110,461 Walmart Single-family residential Crabtree Valley Mall 3-4 story Residential 3 story Office 6 story Mixed-use Outside central business district Within central business district Silver, M. (2012). Presentation for the City of Raleigh.
  16. 16. Mixed Use Development vs. Sprawl
  17. 17. 141 AVERAGE WALKSCORE OF US CITIESWITH POPULATIONS OVER 200K
  18. 18. When you aggregate what that means in terms of going from the lowest to the highest level of State of Place, the numbers are quite startling.FISCAL CONSTRAINTS SETTING PRIORITIES BUY-IN POLITICAL WILL COMMUNITY SUPPORT MEASURING IMPACT FROM HERE TO THERE
  19. 19. And then came Brookings! I finally had the opportunity to truly tie built environment features not just to walking, health, sense of place and community, but to economic value. We gathered IMI and real estate data from over 60 neighborhoods in the Washington DC Metro area that were sampled from over 240 neighborhoods along a continuum of walkability, from the auto-dominated exurbs to the highly walkable core. A meta-analyses examining the results of dozens of studies evaluating the relationship between the built environment and walking guided the development of the first official State of Place algorithm – finally! I created a comprehensive index, ranging from 0 to 100, to make sense out of the 162 data points we were gathering with the IMI. I’ll go into that more in just a little bit, but first the real Eureka moment:
  20. 20. Very Low State of Place™ Index Tied to Economic Value 0 - 20 Low Moderate Good Very Good21 - 40 41 - 60 61 - 80 81 - 100 *PREMIUMS FOR EACH LEVEL INCREASE + $9 SF OFFICE RENTS + $7 SF RETAIL RENTS +80% RETAIL REVENUES + $300 UNIT RES. RENT +$81 SF FOR-SALE RES. VALUE
  21. 21. When you aggregate what that means in terms of going from the lowest to the highest level of State of Place, the numbers are quite startling. + $37 sq. ft. Office Rents + $30 sq. ft. Retail Rents +340% Retail Revenues + $1281/Unit Residential Rent +$347 sq. ft. For-sale Residential State of Place™ Index: 90, Very Good State of Place™ Index: 5, Very Low
  22. 22. And all in all, these premiums have serious implications for economic development in terms of retail and property tax bases WASHINGTON, DC
  23. 23. Existing: $14.59 Avg. Retail Rent/sq. ft. $17.17 Avg. Office Rent/ sq. ft. Potential: $30.18 Retail Rents $31.81 Office Rents HOUSTON
  24. 24. HOUSTON Existing: $124B Total Retail Sales 8.25% Houston Tax Rate $10.2B Tax Revenues Potential (Two level increase): $282B Total Retail Sales $23.3B Tax Revenues
  25. 25. TM
  26. 26. 280+ URBAN DESIGN FEATURES TOUCH, SEE & FEEL WALKABILIT Y FROM ARCADES TO ZEBRA STRIPES
  27. 27. TRAINING VIDEO + INTERACTIVE QUIZ TRAINED COMMUNITY MEMBERS OR STAFF COLLECT DATA MINUTES/B L O C K 10-15 STATE OF PLACE APP SEAMLESSLY TRANSFERS DATA TO SERVERS
  28. 28. 0% 20% 40% 60% 80% 100% DENSITY FORM CONNECTIVIT Y PROXIMITY PARKS & PUBLIC SPACES RECREATIONAL FACILITIES PEDESTRIAN & BIKE AMENITIES TRAFFIC SAFETY AESTHETICS PERSONAL SAFETY URBAN FABRIC DESTINATIONS HUMAN NEEDS & COMFORT LIVELINESS & UPKEEP STATE OF PLACE™ INDEX & PROFILE
  29. 29. For Density, we are measuring building compactness and height, not so much population density – this is particularly important in terms of making it feasible to have enough destinations to walk to within a reasonable walking distance. It can also influence the scale of city – is it for cars or people? DENSITY Compactness & Height
  30. 30. Related to that is Urban Form. Here we are measuring streetscape continuity, so we take into account building setbacks, how the building meets the street, the siting of buildings, and the number and width of buildings. This is what I like to call the hugability of a street. If the form is off, a street can feel aloof or it can feel suffocating. You know you’ve achieved the right proportions of setbacks, street width, and building height when it feels like the street is hugging you. FORM Streetscape Continuity
  31. 31. CONNECTIVITY Access & Barriers
  32. 32. Proximity refers to the diversity of the land use mix – the number of non-residential land uses there are to walk to. So literally, how many of your daily needs, services, and amenities are present within a certain distance of you PROXIMITY Land Use Mix Photo Credit Nakeva Corothers
  33. 33. With parks and public spaces, we include the presence hard and soft scape public spaces, as well as their quality and accessibility. These are often the soul and life of neighborhoods, they are the city’s living rooms. Along with museums and monuments, these are the places you bring your friends and families to when they come visit. I can tell a lot about a city based on how people use their public spaces. PARKS & PUBLIC SPACES
  34. 34. We also look at recreational facilities – separately. This is getting a bit more at recreational walking, but the literature found this to be an important determinant for physical activity, so we measure the presence of outdoor and indoor physical activity facilities. RECREATIONAL FACILITIES Photo Credit Bill Cotter
  35. 35. Pedestrian and bike amenities refer to aspects of the built environment that make it comfortable or pleasant to be a pedestrian, so sidewalk presence and quality, seating, bike lane presence and type, street trees, etc. Along with form, these are the features that truly help distinguish car-focused neighborhoods from people-first places – they are the things that make you want to linger… PEDESTRIA N & BIKE
  36. 36. Along with that, we look at traffic safety. Here we are mainly focusing on the quality and safety of the intersection as well as the presence of traffic calming features. These include the presence of curbcuts, crosswalk markings, traffic standards, and on-street parking. These are the features that help manage all of the mobile members of the public realm – people, strollers, bicyclists, scooters, cars, and buses. TRAFFIC SAFETY
  37. 37. Aesthetics goes beyond the visually pleasing; it also includes aspects of urban design that make places more dynamic and inviting. We look at the transparency of buildings, colors, outdoor dining, street trees, building maintenance, ground floor uses, etc. This is charm, character, the wow factor – the things you’ll most remember about places. AESTHETIC S Liveliness & maintenance
  38. 38. Finally, personal safety refers not to actual crime data but rather the aspects of the built environment that influence our perception of safety – these are called physical incivilities and include features like graffiti, litter, broken windows, abandoned buildings and lighting. These features actually influence walking rates more than the rates of crime incidents. PERSONAL SAFETY
  39. 39. Identify Priorities State of Place Index State of Place Profiles Scenario Analysis Run Analytics
  40. 40. Platform conducts “multi-criterion assessment” to identify top priorities. Example, Walkability as a Goal: Dimension Performanc e Ranking for Goal (Walkability) Impact* Feasibilit y Communit y Score Density 76.5 9 .432 1 4.3 91.4 Form 65.4 9 .543 1 7.1 169.1 Connectivity 55.8 9 .342 1 6.3 136.0 Proximity 74.3 9 .765 2 9.5 353.9 Parks & Public Spaces 23.5 9 .634 2 7.4 873.0 Recreational Facilities 13.4 9 .548 2 5.7 854.2 Pedestrian Amenities 55.4 9 .813 3 8.6 979.0 Traffic Safety 43.1 9 .745 3 8.8 1144.5 Aesthetics 58.4 9 .436 4 7.5 962.3 Personal Safety 71.3 9 .512 4 9.3 529.0 *Impact scores listed here are for explanatory purposes only; the actual impact scores are proprietary.
  41. 41. Identify Priorities State of Place Index State of Place Profiles Scenario Analysis Run Analytics
  42. 42. Compare Interventions See Recommendations Compare Projects
  43. 43. Choose Dimensions To Compare Density Form Connectivity Proximity Parks & Public Spaces Recreational Facilities Pedestrian & Bicyclist Amenities Traffic Safety Aesthetics Personal Safety ✓ ✓ ✓
  44. 44. Parks & Public Spaces $80,000 Pedestrian & Bicyclist Amenities Traffic Safety Add Park Add Plaza New PlazaPark Maintenance Arcades Benches Sidewalk Buffers Street Trees Sidewalk Buffers Crosswalks Curbcuts Midblock Crossing Pedestrian Countdown CurbCuts Enter Project Cost Enter Project Cost Select Interventions
  45. 45. Com. property tax For-sale residential Office rents Retail rents Residential rents Res. property taxes Vacancy Rates Retail Rents Enter Baseline Select Goal Calculate Predicted ROI
  46. 46. Parks & Public Spaces $80,000 Pedestrian & Bicyclist Amenities Traffic Safety $300,000 $150,000 $1.09/sf $0.89/sf Park Maintenance Sidewalk Buffers Curbcuts $1.43/sf Predicted ROI: Retail Rents +4.3% +3.1% +3.7% Impact on State of Place Index
  47. 47. Parks & Public Spaces $80,000 Pedestrian & Bicyclist Amenities Traffic Safety $300,000 $150,000 $1.09/sf $0.89/sf Park Maintenance Sidewalk Buffers Curbcuts $1.43/sf Predicted ROI: Retail Rents +4.3% +3.1% +3.7% Impact on State of Place Index $1.36/dollar $.03/dollar $.10/dollar Value for Money: 100k sqft $109k $89k $143k Total Value Captured: 100k sqft
  48. 48. Compare Interventions See Recommendations Compare Projects
  49. 49. Enter Project Cost Enter Project Cost Enter Project Information Neighborhood 1 $1,800,000 Neighborhood 1 Neighborhood 1 Project 1 Project 2 Project 3
  50. 50. Com. property tax For-sale residential Office rents Retail rents Residential rents Res. property taxes Vacancy Rates Retail Rents Enter Baseline Select Goal Calculate Predicted ROI
  51. 51. Neighborhood 1 $1,800,000 Neighborhood 1 Neighborhood 1 $2,700,000 $2,300,000 $1.43/sf $0.99/sf Project 1 Project 2 Project 3 $1.56/sf Predicted ROI: Retail Rents +6.0% +2.0% +11.0% Impact on State of Place Index Map It
  52. 52. We are doing this currently for one of our clients who is managing a $30M equity fund focusing on underserved neighborhoods in Boston. They are using State of Place to help identify which development projects will have the most impact on Place – and ultimately informing which ones they will fund. Predicted ROI Impact of Proposed Projects
  53. 53. TM mariela@stateofplace.org www.stateofplace.org For full demo: bit.ly/DemoSoP

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