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Urbanization of Suburbia
Friday, October 15
11:00 a.m. – 12:15 p.m.
A Presentation by Robert Brosnan
Planning Director, Arlington County
ULI Fall Conference
October 15, 2010
40 Years of Smar...
PRESENTATION OVERVIEW
 Review of Arlington’s
efforts to use transit
to both redevelop an
older commercial
corridor and en...
Smart Growth
 Smart growth represents the desire
for another form of growth
 Well planned development
 Convenient and w...
Smart Growth
 Arlington has been in the forefront
of this trend for over 40 years
 We used the opportunity of transit
to...
SETTING THE STAGE
 Arlington is a 26 square
mile, urban county which
was a part of the original
District of Columbia
 Po...
SETTING THE STAGE
 1960 - 7.5 million sq. Ft.
Office
 Declining retail corridors
 Emerging market for
government office...
SETTING THE STAGE
 Beginning of the planning
for a regional transit
system
 Embarked on an ambitious
community planning ...
PROPOSED ROUTE
Arlington lobbied strongly for an underground route along the old
commercial corridor vs along the median o...
Development Concepts
 Concentrate high and mid-
density redevelopment around
transit stations (highly
targeted) and taper...
SECTOR PLANS
 Adopted a corridor-wide GLUP based on agreed-to
development goals
 Then focused on developing sector plans...
KEY TO SUCCESS
 Do the planning - Involve the community
 Residents
 Business community
 Developers
 Political will an...
View of Rosslyn-Ballston Metro
Corridor Development Patterns
MEASURING SUCCESS
R-B CORRIDOR
1970
22,000 jobs
5.5 million sf
office
7,000 housing
units
2010
98,500 jobs
21.7 million
sf...
MEASURING SUCCESS
1991
ROSSLYN
 13,637
COURT HOUSE
 5,561
CLARENDON
 2,964
BALLSTON
 9,482
2009
ROSSLYN
 33,382
COURT...
BALANCED DEVELOPMENT =
BALANCED RIDERSHIP
A M P e a kA M O f fP M P e a kP M O f f
T i m e P e r i o d s
0
5
1 0
1 5
2 0
2...
PEDESTRIAN ACCESS
73% WALK TO STATION
5 R-B Corridor Stations
73.0%
7.5%
3.6%
12.9%
2.0%
1.0%
Walk
Metrobus
Other
Bus/Vanp...
MEASURING SUCCESS
 Car ownership (vehicles per household)
 Nationally, almost 90% have a car;
55% have 2 or more
 Arlin...
MEASURING SUCCESS
Getting to work: Less than
half drive
39.3% use transit
10.5% walk or bike
2.3 work at home
MEASURING SUCCESS
0
25,000
50,000
75,000
100,000
125,000
150,000
175,000
200,000
GW
Pkwy
Wash.
Blvd.
Arl.
Blvd
I-66 I-395
...
MEASURING SUCCESS
Street
Segment
Street Type 1996 2001 2006 % Change
1996-2006
Lee Hwy -
Rosslyn
EW 6-lane
arterial
37,770...
MEASURING SUCCESS
 $27.5 billion of a total $57.5 billion in assessed
land and improvements value in the county is in
the...
LESSONS LEARNED
 Transit investments can be used as a
catalyst to reshape communities
 Multimodal transportation strateg...
LESSON LEARNED
 Ensure that transit is integrated with
development – not secondary
 An attractive and functional pedestr...
CONTACT INFORMATION
Robert Brosnan
Planning Director
Department of Community Planning and
Development
703-228-3516
rbrosna...
Crystal City, Virginia
The Rosslyn Ballston Corridor
“30 Years of lessons learned”
Rosslyn
Court House
Clarendon
Virginia Square
Ballston in 1980
Ballston Today
Ballston
 View looking northeast from Randolph Street
Original Site
Liberty Center
Arlington, VA
 Three 12- Story Office
Building...
 View looking northeast from Randolph Street
Liberty Center
Concept
Liberty Center
Arlington, VA
 Transit- Oriented
Rede...
 View looking northeast from Randolph Street
Liberty Center
Arlington, VA
One Liberty Center:
 Secure facility
 Total 3...
Founders Square,
Arlington, VA
Wilson Blvd
Liberty
Center
Site
Kettler
Capitals
Iceplex
Founders
Square
Mosaic
Park
FDIC
Ballston
Commons Mall
ONR
NSF
 ...
 Transit Oriented
Development
 Pedestrian Environment
– Quincy Plan Linkage
 Across Wilson Blvd.
from Liberty Center
 ...
 View looking northeast from Randolph Street
Site Plan
Office South
Founders Square
Arlington, VA
 Secure Facility – 82’...
 18 stories (approved 15)
 382,400 GSF
(approved 312,660)
374,730 SF office
(approved 299,760)
7,670 SF retail
(approv...
 View looking west along Wilson
Residential North
Founders Square
Arlington, VA
Site Plan
 Density: 238,060 GSF
(approve...
Founders Square
Arlington, VA
Residential South- Hotel
View looking south west along Wilson Boulevard
Site Plan
 183 Room...
Plaza
Features
 Level central paved
space for events
 Double row of trees
 Continuous retail frontage
wrapping onto Wil...
Mosaic Park
Founders Square
Arlington, VA
 2.5 Acres
 Funded by sale of TDR’s
 Privately funded new
park
 Overall Foun...
 First LEED-Gold for
Neighborhood Development
in Arlington
 Office South: LEED-CS
Gold & LEED-CI Platinum
 Office North...
 View looking northeast from Randolph Street
Ballston
Liberty
Center
Founders
Square
Future
Mosaic Park
Kettler
Capitals
...
Founder’s
Square
Arlington, VA
Thank You
Crystal City, Virginia
Creating The Environment for Change
• BRAC – 17,000 Jobs Leaving
• Buildings at end-of-life
• A great moment in time
• Loc...
Creating an Economic Engine for Development
Proposed Heights for Redevelopment 40,000,000 GFA
Existing Allowed Heights by ...
• Former Railroad
Brownfield Site
• Started in1963
• Peak Construction
1970
• Full Build-Out
in the late 1980’s
• Market D...
Crystal City 2050
Sector Plan Adopted 10/5/10
Today and Tomorrow
Existing Program
•Office: 10,797,705 SF
•Retail: 847,823 SF
•Hotel: 3,525,184 SF
•Residential: 9,339,02...
Before 25 Million GFA
Existing Density 24.7 mil sf
After 40 Million GFA
Retained Buildings
Height and Replacement
Found Sites
18.3 mil sf
13.2 mil sf
8.2 mil sf
I. Community Process
• Crystal City Task Force Meetings
• The Camp Out
• The Crystal City Walking Tour
• Stakeholder Meeti...
I. Who was at The Table?
• Arlington County Board
• Crystal City Task Force
• Planning Commission
• Transportation Commiss...
II. Consolidating the Core Neighborhoods
II. Consolidating the Core Neighborhoods
II. Consolidating the Core Neighborhoods
III. Building a Network of Open Spaces
III. Building a Network of Open Spaces
III. Maximize Sun
Exposure at Open Space
55% Sunlight in Parks and Plazas
from 11:00am to 3:00pm at Spring
Equinox
IV. Promoting Sustainable Practices
• Green Roofs
• LEED Silver
• 40 Million GSF Balanced
LW&P in 260 Acres
• Planes, Trai...
V. A Place for Planes, Trains, Autos, Bikes and People
V. Transforming a Highway into a Boulevard
V.
V.
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Urbanization of Suburbia

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2010 ULI Fall Meeting Presentation
October 15, 2010
11:00 am to 12:15 pm

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Urbanization of Suburbia

  1. 1. Urbanization of Suburbia Friday, October 15 11:00 a.m. – 12:15 p.m.
  2. 2. A Presentation by Robert Brosnan Planning Director, Arlington County ULI Fall Conference October 15, 2010 40 Years of Smart Growth Arlington County’s Experience with Transit Oriented Development in the Rosslyn-Ballston Metro Corridor
  3. 3. PRESENTATION OVERVIEW  Review of Arlington’s efforts to use transit to both redevelop an older commercial corridor and ensure future riders for the system  How we planned  Identify some of the successes and lessons learned
  4. 4. Smart Growth  Smart growth represents the desire for another form of growth  Well planned development  Convenient and walkable places  Transit accessible with a robust menu of transportation options  Preserves open spaces  Efficiently uses existing infrastructure  Offers alternatives to automobiles
  5. 5. Smart Growth  Arlington has been in the forefront of this trend for over 40 years  We used the opportunity of transit to reshape an older, inner suburb into a thriving urban village with over 37 million sq. ft. of new development and a reduction in auto traffic
  6. 6. SETTING THE STAGE  Arlington is a 26 square mile, urban county which was a part of the original District of Columbia  Population 212,200  Jobs 207,800  Housing units 105,428  Located in the core of a rapidly growing Washington region (over 5 million residents, 3 million jobs and 1,200 sq. miles of urbanized area)
  7. 7. SETTING THE STAGE  1960 - 7.5 million sq. Ft. Office  Declining retail corridors  Emerging market for government office space  Strong single family neighborhoods  Large number of garden apartments, some of which were beginning to decline  97,505 jobs  71,230 housing units 1962
  8. 8. SETTING THE STAGE  Beginning of the planning for a regional transit system  Embarked on an ambitious community planning effort  Debated the impacts of development vs the benefits of growth and decided we wanted to encourage growth as well as encourage riders
  9. 9. PROPOSED ROUTE Arlington lobbied strongly for an underground route along the old commercial corridor vs along the median of future highway Proposed Route Approved Route
  10. 10. Development Concepts  Concentrate high and mid- density redevelopment around transit stations (highly targeted) and taper down to existing neighborhoods  Encourage a mix of uses and services in station areas  Create high quality pedestrian environments and enhanced open space  Preserve and reinvest in established residential neighborhoods
  11. 11. SECTOR PLANS  Adopted a corridor-wide GLUP based on agreed-to development goals  Then focused on developing sector plans to create distinctive “urban villages”  Overall vision for each station area  Conceptual Plan  Development framework  Establish street network  Urban design standards  Densities and heights
  12. 12. KEY TO SUCCESS  Do the planning - Involve the community  Residents  Business community  Developers  Political will and support  Plans that result have community buy-in  Plans that set expectations for both the community and developers – avoids the fights later  Continued outreach and education
  13. 13. View of Rosslyn-Ballston Metro Corridor Development Patterns
  14. 14. MEASURING SUCCESS R-B CORRIDOR 1970 22,000 jobs 5.5 million sf office 7,000 housing units 2010 98,500 jobs 21.7 million sf office 28,643 housing units
  15. 15. MEASURING SUCCESS 1991 ROSSLYN  13,637 COURT HOUSE  5,561 CLARENDON  2,964 BALLSTON  9,482 2009 ROSSLYN  33,382 COURT HOUSE  14,636 CLARENDON  8,787 BALLSTON  24,751 METRO RIDERSHIP (Average daily entries and exits)
  16. 16. BALANCED DEVELOPMENT = BALANCED RIDERSHIP A M P e a kA M O f fP M P e a kP M O f f T i m e P e r i o d s 0 5 1 0 1 5 2 0 2 5 3 0 3 5 Thousands Passengers E n t r i e s E x i t s Arlington Metrorail Stations R id e r s h ip b y T im e P e r io d MEASURING SUCCESS
  17. 17. PEDESTRIAN ACCESS 73% WALK TO STATION 5 R-B Corridor Stations 73.0% 7.5% 3.6% 12.9% 2.0% 1.0% Walk Metrobus Other Bus/Vanpool Auto (incl. Drop- off) Other No Response
  18. 18. MEASURING SUCCESS  Car ownership (vehicles per household)  Nationally, almost 90% have a car; 55% have 2 or more  Arlington: 12% have zero cars; less than 40% have 2 or more  Metro Corridors: 17.9% have zero cars, while less than 25% have 2 or more Source – 2000 Census
  19. 19. MEASURING SUCCESS Getting to work: Less than half drive 39.3% use transit 10.5% walk or bike 2.3 work at home
  20. 20. MEASURING SUCCESS 0 25,000 50,000 75,000 100,000 125,000 150,000 175,000 200,000 GW Pkwy Wash. Blvd. Arl. Blvd I-66 I-395 1980 1990 1996 2002  Substantial growth in traffic volumes on regional limited access highways, with most of the growth between 1980 and 1990  Modest growth in traffic on arterial and local streets which has flattened out in the last 10 years (averaging less than ½% per year on many streets)0 10,000 20,000 30,000 40,000 50,000 Rt. 1 Lee Hwy Col. Pk. Carlin Sp. G. Mason 1980 1991 1996 Present Traffic Trends – Regional & Local Facilities
  21. 21. MEASURING SUCCESS Street Segment Street Type 1996 2001 2006 % Change 1996-2006 Lee Hwy - Rosslyn EW 6-lane arterial 37,770 33,632 32,428 -14.1% Wash. Blvd – VA Sq. EW 4-lane arterial 20,469 19,478 18,069 -11.8% Clarendon Blvd. EW 2-lane 1- way arterial 13,980 14,199 14,539 4% Wilson Blvd. - Clarendon EW 2-lane 1- way arterial 16,368 16,265 13,797 -15.8% Arlington Blvd. EW 6-lane arterial 55,865 63,272 60,223 7.8% Glebe Road - Ballston NS 6-lane arterial 35,230 39,409 35,900 1.2% G. Mason Drive – west of Ballston NS 4-lane arterial 20,002 22,578 23,386 16.9% Traffic Trends on Arterial Streets
  22. 22. MEASURING SUCCESS  $27.5 billion of a total $57.5 billion in assessed land and improvements value in the county is in the metro corridors which is 11% of total land  Today Arlington has more office space than downtown  Dallas  Los Angeles  Denver  Boston
  23. 23. LESSONS LEARNED  Transit investments can be used as a catalyst to reshape communities  Multimodal transportation strategies can result in substantial benefits – allowing continued growth with less reliance on autos  Establish the vision, design supportive public policies/plans and tools and be patient  Build community consensus
  24. 24. LESSON LEARNED  Ensure that transit is integrated with development – not secondary  An attractive and functional pedestrian environment is important  Develop public-private partnerships to continue consensus building and assist in the implementation  Integrity of plan – be consistent  Do the detailed planning at the sector area to avoid the battles at development review time
  25. 25. CONTACT INFORMATION Robert Brosnan Planning Director Department of Community Planning and Development 703-228-3516 rbrosnan@arlingtonva.us www.arlingtonva.us
  26. 26. Crystal City, Virginia
  27. 27. The Rosslyn Ballston Corridor “30 Years of lessons learned”
  28. 28. Rosslyn
  29. 29. Court House
  30. 30. Clarendon
  31. 31. Virginia Square
  32. 32. Ballston in 1980 Ballston Today Ballston
  33. 33.  View looking northeast from Randolph Street Original Site Liberty Center Arlington, VA  Three 12- Story Office Buildings  530,000 SF  Originally built in 1960’s  Leased to GSA Fairfax Dr.
  34. 34.  View looking northeast from Randolph Street Liberty Center Concept Liberty Center Arlington, VA  Transit- Oriented Redevelopment  Mixed Use  2 Office Buildings and 2 Residential Buildings  Open Space  Ground Floor Retail with Streetscape elements and seating
  35. 35.  View looking northeast from Randolph Street Liberty Center Arlington, VA One Liberty Center:  Secure facility  Total 316,000 SF  Thirteen stories Two Liberty Center:  Total 180,000 SF  Nine stories The Residences at Liberty Center:  233 Condo units  Twenty one stories Liberty Tower:  235 Rental units  Twenty one stories
  36. 36. Founders Square, Arlington, VA
  37. 37. Wilson Blvd Liberty Center Site Kettler Capitals Iceplex Founders Square Mosaic Park FDIC Ballston Commons Mall ONR NSF  Directly between two Metro Stops  Adjacent to Liberty Center and future Mosaic Park  Currently under construction  Blocks from Federal Deposit Insurance Corporation, National Science Foundation, Office of Naval Research and Virginia Tech Founders Square Arlington, VA Overall SiteVirginia Tech
  38. 38.  Transit Oriented Development  Pedestrian Environment – Quincy Plan Linkage  Across Wilson Blvd. from Liberty Center  LEED Goals  View looking southeast from Wilson Boulevard Founders Square Arlington, VA Site Plan
  39. 39.  View looking northeast from Randolph Street Site Plan Office South Founders Square Arlington, VA  Secure Facility – 82’ secure perimeter  Total: 355,530 GSF  Parking – 517 Spaces  Thirteen Stories  LEED- Gold Core & Shell and LEED- Platinum Commercial Interiors
  40. 40.  18 stories (approved 15)  382,400 GSF (approved 312,660) 374,730 SF office (approved 299,760) 7,670 SF retail (approved 8,000)  457 parking spaces (approved 485)  LEED Gold Proposed  View looking southeast from Wilson Boulevard Founders Square Arlington, VA Site Plan Office North
  41. 41.  View looking west along Wilson Residential North Founders Square Arlington, VA Site Plan  Density: 238,060 GSF (approved 251,960)  Residential – 256 Units (approved 198)  Retail – 9,035 GSF (approved 8,900)  Parking – 272 Spaces (approved 244)  LEED Silver
  42. 42. Founders Square Arlington, VA Residential South- Hotel View looking south west along Wilson Boulevard Site Plan  183 Room Marriott Residence Inn  Parking – 106 Spaces  Ground Floor Retail  LEED Silver
  43. 43. Plaza Features  Level central paved space for events  Double row of trees  Continuous retail frontage wrapping onto Wilson Blvd.  Café seating flanking central space Founders Square Arlington, VA
  44. 44. Mosaic Park Founders Square Arlington, VA  2.5 Acres  Funded by sale of TDR’s  Privately funded new park  Overall Founders Square and Mosaic Park – 66% open space 4040 Wilson DARPA Reside ntial North Hotel Retail Mosaic Park
  45. 45.  First LEED-Gold for Neighborhood Development in Arlington  Office South: LEED-CS Gold & LEED-CI Platinum  Office North: LEED-NC Gold  Residential North: LEED- NC Silver  Residential South/Hotel: LEED-NC Silver  View looking southeast from Wilson Blvd Founders Square Arlington, VA LEED Goals 404 0 Wils on DAR PA Res. Nort h Hote l Reta il Mosaic Park 2LC OLC (ON R) Con dos Apartment s
  46. 46.  View looking northeast from Randolph Street Ballston Liberty Center Founders Square Future Mosaic Park Kettler Capitals Iceplex Ballston Commons Mall Harris Teeter Grocery Store Quincy Park Glebe Road Arlington County Library Liberty Center and Founders Square  Over 2 Million SF of mixed use transit- oriented development  Approximately 5,000 office workers  Approximately 1,300 residents and guests  Approximately 60,000 SF of retail  Approximately $1 Billion of overall investment
  47. 47. Founder’s Square Arlington, VA Thank You
  48. 48. Crystal City, Virginia
  49. 49. Creating The Environment for Change • BRAC – 17,000 Jobs Leaving • Buildings at end-of-life • A great moment in time • Location, location, location • Planes, Trains, and Autos • Creating a Strong Urban Plan with Principles that Allow Change Over Time • 25,000,000 GSF • Small # Land Owners • Found Sites ( Land Use Efficiency) • Redevelopment Incentivized (2 ½ Times Existing Density) • An Open County Process • Crystal City Plan Review Council
  50. 50. Creating an Economic Engine for Development Proposed Heights for Redevelopment 40,000,000 GFA Existing Allowed Heights by Zoning 25,000,000 GFA
  51. 51. • Former Railroad Brownfield Site • Started in1963 • Peak Construction 1970 • Full Build-Out in the late 1980’s • Market Driven Plan • Developed Over 30+ Years by Charles E. Smith Co. • Metro Station - 1977 • VRE - 1992 • Existing - 25 Million SF
  52. 52. Crystal City 2050 Sector Plan Adopted 10/5/10
  53. 53. Today and Tomorrow Existing Program •Office: 10,797,705 SF •Retail: 847,823 SF •Hotel: 3,525,184 SF •Residential: 9,339,021 SF •Circulation/Plinth: 140,300 SF •Service: 87,065 SF TOTAL: 24,737,098 SF Proposed Program •Office: 16,073,254 SF •Retail: 1,513,311 SF •Hotel: 5,154,480 SF •Residential: 16,835,902 SF •Circulation/Plinth: 104,590 SF •Service: 69,440 SF TOTAL: 39,750,977 SF
  54. 54. Before 25 Million GFA Existing Density 24.7 mil sf
  55. 55. After 40 Million GFA Retained Buildings Height and Replacement Found Sites 18.3 mil sf 13.2 mil sf 8.2 mil sf
  56. 56. I. Community Process • Crystal City Task Force Meetings • The Camp Out • The Crystal City Walking Tour • Stakeholder Meetings - The Community Charrette • Transportation Walking Tour • Regional Partners Transportation Working Sessions • Task Force Transit Subcommittee • Community Forums • County Board Work Sessions • Long Range Planning Committee • Board Work Sessions and Hearings • 4 Years-Over 90 Meetings
  57. 57. I. Who was at The Table? • Arlington County Board • Crystal City Task Force • Planning Commission • Transportation Commission • Economic Development Commission • Parks and Recreation Commission • Commission for the Arts • Housing Commission • Environmental and Energy Conservation Commission • Stakeholders – Crystal City BID – Crystal City Residents – Aurora Highlands Civil Association – Arlington Ridge Civic Association – Crystal City Property Owners/ Developers • County and Staff Groups – Department of Community Planning, Housing and Development: Planning Division, Housing Division – Arlington Economic Development – Department of Environmental Services- Transportation – Department of Parks, Recreation and Cultural Resources • Consultants – Torti Gallas and Partners, Inc. – Kimley-Horn and Associates – DMJM Harris | AECOM – EDAW – Economics Research Associates – NelsonNygaard Consulting Associates – Robert Charles Lesser & Company – Vladislav Yeliseyev, Architectural Illustrations • 17 Citizen + County Staff Groups • Over 700 Participants
  58. 58. II. Consolidating the Core Neighborhoods
  59. 59. II. Consolidating the Core Neighborhoods
  60. 60. II. Consolidating the Core Neighborhoods
  61. 61. III. Building a Network of Open Spaces
  62. 62. III. Building a Network of Open Spaces
  63. 63. III. Maximize Sun Exposure at Open Space 55% Sunlight in Parks and Plazas from 11:00am to 3:00pm at Spring Equinox
  64. 64. IV. Promoting Sustainable Practices • Green Roofs • LEED Silver • 40 Million GSF Balanced LW&P in 260 Acres • Planes, Trains, Automobiles and Pedestrians • Sunshine • Wind • Solar
  65. 65. V. A Place for Planes, Trains, Autos, Bikes and People
  66. 66. V. Transforming a Highway into a Boulevard
  67. 67. V.
  68. 68. V.

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