Parenting Styles

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Parenting Styles

  1. 1. Parenting Styles <ul><li>Authoritarian </li></ul><ul><li>Permissive Style </li></ul><ul><li>Democratic Style </li></ul>
  2. 2. The Authoritarian Style <ul><li>Parents are like the police officer or judge. </li></ul><ul><li>They control the problem-solving process, and tend to be loud and angry. </li></ul><ul><li>Children obey their parents out of fear. </li></ul><ul><li>It is a win-lose dynamic and parents usually win. </li></ul>Firm, But Not Respectful
  3. 3. How Children Respond <ul><li>Anger </li></ul><ul><li>Rebellion </li></ul><ul><li>Submission </li></ul><ul><li>Blaming Others </li></ul><ul><li>Lying, Hiding Feelings </li></ul><ul><li>Fear of Trying Something New … </li></ul>
  4. 4. Drawbacks of Authoritarian Style <ul><li>It does not teach children about responsibility, problems solving and respectful communication. </li></ul><ul><li>It teaches children to be dependent on adults. </li></ul>
  5. 5. Why So Many Parents Use This Style? <ul><li>Most parents use it because they were raised that way themselves. </li></ul><ul><li>It feels natural, and parents do not question its effectiveness. </li></ul>
  6. 6. The Permissive Style <ul><li>Permissive parents use different ways to persuade children to cooperate. </li></ul><ul><li>The underlying belief is that kids will cooperate when they understand that cooperation is the right thing to do. </li></ul>Respectful, But Not Firm
  7. 7. Why It Is Not Working? <ul><li>Permissiveness is a guidance system based on yellow lights. </li></ul><ul><li>Stopping is optional, not required. </li></ul><ul><li>Kids know it, but permissive parents are not aware that their signals do not really require stopping. </li></ul>
  8. 8. What Children Learn? <ul><li>Rules are for others, not for me. </li></ul><ul><li>Parents serve children. </li></ul><ul><li>Parents are responsible for solving children’s problems. </li></ul><ul><li>Dependency, disrespect, self-centeredness. </li></ul>
  9. 9. Drawbacks of This Approach <ul><li>While parents protect the children from suffering from consequences of their poor choices, children lose the opportunities to learn from their mistakes. </li></ul>
  10. 10. Democratic Style <ul><li>The Democratic approach is a win-win method which combines firmness with respect. </li></ul><ul><li>It accomplishes all of our basic training goals. </li></ul>Firm and Respectful
  11. 11. Parents’ Beliefs <ul><li>Children are capable of solving problems on their own. </li></ul><ul><li>Children should be given choices and allowed to learn from their choices. </li></ul><ul><li>Encouragement is an effective way to motivate cooperation. </li></ul>
  12. 12. What Children Learn? <ul><li>Responsibility </li></ul><ul><li>Cooperation </li></ul><ul><li>Independence </li></ul><ul><li>Respect for rules and authority </li></ul><ul><li>Self-control </li></ul>
  13. 13. How Children Respond? <ul><li>More cooperation. </li></ul><ul><li>Less limit testing. </li></ul><ul><li>Resolve problems on their own. </li></ul><ul><li>Regard parents’ words seriously </li></ul>
  14. 14. Reference: <ul><li>MacKenzie, R. J. (2001). Setting Limits with Your Strong-Willed Child. New York: Three Rivers Press. </li></ul>

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