Health and safety regulations
Lyndsae Drury
Task 4
• a) Research the safe working practices in a Forensics laboratory,
making bullet point notes on them. (P5)
• b) Ex...
Health and safety report.
• The report shows that 72 HSE staff members
were injured in the course of their work,
including...
Act dates back to 1974
• The basis of British health and safety law is the
Health and Safety at Work Act 1974.
• The Manag...
• The main requirement on employers is to carry
out a risk assessment. Employers with five or
more employees need to recor...
Health and safety
• The HSE leaflet Five steps to risk assessment will give you more
information. Besides carrying out a r...
The health and safety law poster
• The Health and safety law poster must be
displayed on all business premises. There are
...
Health and safety
What employers must do for you
1 Decide what could harm you in your job and the precautions to stop it. ...
• What you must do
• 1 Follow the training you have received when using any
work items your employer has given you.
• 2 Ta...
In December 1999, Emory University in Atlanta
paid out $66,400 in fines and changed its
procedures following the death two...
Whose fault is it?
• In 1995, a seemingly small-scale spill of hydrofluoric
acid killed a technician in Australia. He died...
Dimethylmercury
• The slow death that befell Dartmouth chemist
Karen Wetterhahn when she was exposed to a
few drops of the...
Whose fault was this?
• After Wetterhahn's mercury poisoning was discovered, her
colleagues tested various safety gloves a...
Safety information of dimethylmercury
• Dimethylmercury is extremely toxic and dangerous to handle. Absorption of doses
as...
RIDDOR 2013
• Types of reportable injury Reporting of Injuries, Diseases and Dangerous Occurrences Regulations
• The death...
Accident reporting Incidence
• Over-seven-day incapacitation of a worker
• Accidents must be reported where they result in...
Case study one
• Ralph, had an accident at work, he was picking up hypodermic
needles at the scene of crime where a heroin...
Answer
• Yes, Ralph was knocked unconscious and so
this needs to be reported under RIDDOR
regulations.
• Ralph was also ex...
Princess
• Princess was working in the lab and she cut
herself with a glass beaker which broke in her
hand and needed stit...
answer
• Yes, Princess was incapacitated for 6 weeks
RIDDOR 2013
• Exposure to carcinogens, mutagens and biological agents
• This section noteType=Explanatory Memorandum has n...
Basel
• Basel turned on the lights at work and he was
electrocuted to death.
• Does this need to be reported under the
RID...
Upcoming SlideShare
Loading in …5
×

Health and safety regulations1 1

1,388 views

Published on

unit 2 working in the science industry power points

Published in: Science, Technology, Business
0 Comments
0 Likes
Statistics
Notes
  • Be the first to comment

  • Be the first to like this

No Downloads
Views
Total views
1,388
On SlideShare
0
From Embeds
0
Number of Embeds
2
Actions
Shares
0
Downloads
8
Comments
0
Likes
0
Embeds 0
No embeds

No notes for slide

Health and safety regulations1 1

  1. 1. Health and safety regulations Lyndsae Drury
  2. 2. Task 4 • a) Research the safe working practices in a Forensics laboratory, making bullet point notes on them. (P5) • b) Explain why updated regulations and legislations are required to ensure safe working practices. Using real examples (from internet, journals, news), explain what can go wrong if these regulations are not followed. All sources and quotes must be acknowledged. (M5) • c) There have been many stories in the news about health and safety not being taken seriously in scientific workplaces. You have been asked to show that this is not true for your company. Write a short report about your Forensics laboratory, including: • - Why are risk assessments carried out? • - How is your company making sure it is meeting its regulations? (D4)
  3. 3. Health and safety report. • The report shows that 72 HSE staff members were injured in the course of their work, including 13 by trips or slips and five in road accidents. A further 29 suffered illnesses, such as back and neck injury, from using computer monitors, while 22 were off with work-related stress. Nine people suffered accidents that left them unable to work for more than three days and the average annual amount of sick leave rose to 6.8 days, with 24,000 hours lost to ill health.
  4. 4. Act dates back to 1974 • The basis of British health and safety law is the Health and Safety at Work Act 1974. • The Management of Health and Safety at W ork Regulations 1999 (the Management Regulations) generally make more explicit what employers are required to do to manage health and safety under the Health and Safety at W ork Act. Like the Act, they apply to every work activity .
  5. 5. • The main requirement on employers is to carry out a risk assessment. Employers with five or more employees need to record the significant findings of the risk assessment. • Risk assessment should be straightforward in a simple workplace such as a typical office. It should only be complicated if it deals with serious hazar ds such as those on a nuclear power station, a chemical plant, laboratory or an oil rig.
  6. 6. Health and safety • The HSE leaflet Five steps to risk assessment will give you more information. Besides carrying out a risk assessment, employers also need to: • make arrangements • implementing the health and safety measures as risk assessment; • appoint competent people (often themselves or company colleagues) implement arrangements; • set up emergency procedures; • provide clear information and training to employees; • work together with other employers sharing the same workplace. (HSE 2013)
  7. 7. The health and safety law poster • The Health and safety law poster must be displayed on all business premises. There are various versions of the poster, so that you can select the most appropriate for your business, depending on where in the UK your business is based. • Employers are required, by law, to either display the HSE-approved law poster or to provide each of their workers with the equivalent leaflet (available as a free download
  8. 8. Health and safety What employers must do for you 1 Decide what could harm you in your job and the precautions to stop it. This is part of risk assessment. 2 In a way you can understand, explain how risks will be controlled and tell you who is responsible for this. 3 Consult and work with you and your health and safety representatives in protecting everyone from harm in the workplace. 4 Free of charge, give you the health and safety training you need to do your job. 5 Free of charge, provide you with any equipment and protective clothing you need, and ensure it is properly looked after. 6 Provide toilets, washing facilities and drinking water. 7 Provide adequate first-aid facilities. 8 Report major injuries and fatalities at work to our Incident Contact Centre: 0845 300 9923. Report other injuries, diseases and dangerous incidents online at www.hse.gov.uk. 9 Have insurance that covers you in case you get hurt at work or ill through work. Display a hard copy or electronic copy of the current insurance certificate where you can easily read it. 10 Work with any other employers or contractors sharing the workplace or providing employees (such as agency workers), so that everyone’s health and safety is protected.
  9. 9. • What you must do • 1 Follow the training you have received when using any work items your employer has given you. • 2 Take reasonable care of your own and other people’s health and safety. • 3 Co-operate with your employer on health and safety. • 4 Tell someone (your employer, supervisor, or health and safety representative) if you think the work or inadequate precautions are putting anyone’s health and safety at serious risk.
  10. 10. In December 1999, Emory University in Atlanta paid out $66,400 in fines and changed its procedures following the death two years earlier of primate researcher Elizabeth Griffin who contracted herpes B after being hit in the eye with fecal material, urine, or saliva while putting a rhesus monkey in a cage at the Yerkes Regional Primate Center.
  11. 11. Whose fault is it? • In 1995, a seemingly small-scale spill of hydrofluoric acid killed a technician in Australia. He died from multi- organ failure two weeks after the incident. • He was alone, • wearing only rubber gloves and sleeve protectors • He was sitting down with nothing covering his lap. • He was working in a crowded fume hood. • The lab had no emergency shower • nor any calcium gluconate gel antidote available.
  12. 12. Dimethylmercury • The slow death that befell Dartmouth chemist Karen Wetterhahn when she was exposed to a few drops of the highly toxic dimethylmercury in August 1996 took several months to kill her. Although Wetterhahn was wearing latex gloves this compound rapidly penetrated them and was absorbed through her skin. • Ironically, she was at the time using dimethylmercury to examine the effects of toxic metals, such as chromium, on human cells.
  13. 13. Whose fault was this? • After Wetterhahn's mercury poisoning was discovered, her colleagues tested various safety gloves against dimethylmercury and found that the small, apolar molecule diffuses through most of them in seconds, much more quickly than expected. • As a result, it is now recommended to wear highly resistant, flexible, plastic-laminate gloves when handling dimethylmercury and other similarly dangerous substances. For increased protection, such thin gloves can be worn under long-cuffed, heavy-duty outer gloves made of, for example, neoprene
  14. 14. Safety information of dimethylmercury • Dimethylmercury is extremely toxic and dangerous to handle. Absorption of doses as low as 0.1 mL has proven fatal.[6] The risks are enhanced because of the high vapor pressure of the liquid.[citation needed] • Dimethylmercury passes through latex, PVC, butyl, and neoprene rapidly (within seconds) and is absorbed through the skin. Therefore, most laboratory gloves do not provide adequate protection from it, and the only safe precaution is to handle dimethylmercury while wearing highly resistant laminated gloves underneath long- cuffed neoprene or other heavy-duty gloves. A long face shield and work under a fume hood are also indicated.[6][7] • Dimethylmercury crosses the blood–brain barrier easily, probably owing to formation of a complex with cysteine.[citation needed] It is eliminated from the organism slowly, and therefore has a tendency to bioaccumulate. The symptoms of poisoning may be delayed by months, possibly too late for effective treatment.[citation needed] • The toxicity of dimethylmercury was highlighted with the death of the inorganic chemist Karen Wetterhahn of Dartmouth College in 1997, months after spilling no more than a few drops of this compound on her latex-gloved hand
  15. 15. RIDDOR 2013 • Types of reportable injury Reporting of Injuries, Diseases and Dangerous Occurrences Regulations • The death of any person • All deaths to workers and non-workers, with the exception of suicides, must be reported if they arise from a work-related accident, including an act of physical violence to a worker. • Specified injuries to workers • The list of ‘specified injuries’ in RIDDOR 2013 replaces the previous list of ‘major injuries’ in RIDDOR 1995. Specified injuries are (regulation 4): • fractures, other than to fingers, thumbs and toes • amputations • any injury likely to lead to permanent loss of sight or reduction in sight • any crush injury to the head or torso causing damage to the brain or internal organs • serious burns (including scalding) which: – covers more than 10% of the body – causes significant damage to the eyes, respiratory system or other vital organs • any scalping requiring hospital treatment • any loss of consciousness caused by head injury or asphyxia • any other injury arising from working in an enclosed space which: – leads to hypothermia or heat-induced illness – requires resuscitation or admittance to hospital for more than 24 hours
  16. 16. Accident reporting Incidence • Over-seven-day incapacitation of a worker • Accidents must be reported where they result in an employee or self-employed person being away from work, or unable to perform their normal work duties, for more than seven consecutive days as the result of their injury. This seven day period does not include the day of the accident, but does include weekends and rest days. The report must be made within 15 days of the accident. • Over-three-day incapacitation • Accidents must be recorded, but not reported where they result in a worker being incapacitated for more than three consecutive days. If you are an employer, who must keep an accident book under the Social Security (Claims and Payments) Regulations 1979, that record will be enough. • Non fatal accidents to non-workers (eg members of the public) • Accidents to members of the public or others who are not at work must be reported if they result in an injury and the person is taken directly from the scene of the accident to hospital for treatment to that injury. Examinations and diagnostic tests do not constitute ‘treatment’ in such circumstances.
  17. 17. Case study one • Ralph, had an accident at work, he was picking up hypodermic needles at the scene of crime where a heroine addict was found murdered. • He needle sticked himself with a dirty hypodermic needle. • Ralph had a panic attack and tripped up, at the scene of Crime and knocked himself unconcious. • He took three days off consecutively and then took a HIV test, 1 week, 6 weeks and 3 months after the event, each day required a half day off work. During this time Ralph also required counselling to destress from the anxiety that he may have contracted HIV. • Which one of the RIDDOR regulations does Ralph come under?
  18. 18. Answer • Yes, Ralph was knocked unconscious and so this needs to be reported under RIDDOR regulations. • Ralph was also exposed to biological agents in his occupation which could lead to disease so these both need to be reported under RIDDOR
  19. 19. Princess • Princess was working in the lab and she cut herself with a glass beaker which broke in her hand and needed stitches. • Princess needed two days off work and when she returned could not do her normal duties as one of her hands was in a sling for 6 weeks. • Does this accident need to be reported under RIDDOR?
  20. 20. answer • Yes, Princess was incapacitated for 6 weeks
  21. 21. RIDDOR 2013 • Exposure to carcinogens, mutagens and biological agents • This section noteType=Explanatory Memorandum has no associated • 9. Where, in relation to a person at work, the responsible person receives a diagnosis of— • (a)any cancer attributed to an occupational exposure to a known human carcinogen or mutagen (including ionising radiation); or • (b)any disease attributed to an occupational exposure to a biological agent, • the responsible person must follow the reporting procedure, subject to regulations 14 and 15.
  22. 22. Basel • Basel turned on the lights at work and he was electrocuted to death. • Does this need to be reported under the RIDDOR regulations

×