Pre DACUM
thinking, tools
and examples
Part I
Where did you leave off yesterday?
What will you learn today?
What is the one problem or opportunity
you really wan...
Part II
Technopolis (Kozmetsky)
TEAMS Forecasting Tools (Bettersworth)
Example Technology Flows
DACUM
Example Technology...
Maze – How do we
model these
problems?
Maze – How do we
incorporate soft
skills?
Maze – How do we
incorporate
enthusiam?
Engagement
21st
Century Learning
Styles
Andragogy-Pedagogy
Space Teams, ACCD
Space Teams, ACCD
Space Teams, ACCD
Space Teams, ACCD
Tell me
what you
see..
In order to answer your
questions of Maze, we have to
ask these questions of
ourselves and perform the
answers through act...
In order to answer your
questions of Maze, we have to
ask these questions of
ourselves and perform the
answers through act...
Please
help me
2 Volunteer Scribe
1 fast typer and 1 neat hand writer
Please
help me
2 Volunteer Scribe
1 fast typer and 1 neat hand writer
1 Keeper of Christmas-the bell
Part I
Where did you leave off yesterday?
What will you learn today?
What is the one problem or opportunity
you really wan...
What will you
learn today?
See it
Map it
Think it
Design it for yourself….
Tools & Techniques
Some stories,
Socratic dialogue
and some thinking-
doing tools…
And a mode shift to
doing…
…a shift to
transdisciplinarity…
Transdisciplinarios
Piensa
& Haz
Cómo nos
organizamos?
Transdisciplinarity
Beyond the disciplines
Engaging the real world
Learning connected to doing
Solving real world problems...
Transdisciplinarity…
Theoretical
Knowledge
Applied Learning
Real world
problem or
opportunity
Yang Cai, Ingo Snel, Betty Chenga, Suman
Bharathi, Clementine Klein d, Judith Klein-
Seetharaman; Carnegie Mellon Universi...
I have something for you to
think about individually for the
next hour or so and the rest of
the day. Please get a piece o...
Part I
Where did you leave off yesterday?
What will you learn today?
What is the one problem or opportunity
you really wan...
What is the one problem
or opportunity you really
want to work on? 1, 2, 3
You graduate
Friday…
What is your
takeaway?
What will you
do next?
What is the one problem
or opportunity you really
want to work on? 1, 2, 3
Transdisciplinarity…
Theoretical
Knowledge
Applied Learning
Real world
problem or
opportunity
What is the one problem
or opportunity you really
want to work on? 1, 2, 3
Question
Zero Time
Keep the
answer to your
self for now.
Part I
Where did you leave off yesterday?
What will you learn today?
What is the one problem or opportunity
you really wan...
We are going?
Mars
And beyond
Burns Cliff
Image NASA/JPL
Skill Mergers
?
Mars Opportunity Rover
Burns Cliff
Image NASA/JPL
Skill Mergers
?
Mars Opportunity Rover
March 25, 2014
Courtesy of Charmed Labs
March 25, 2014
Courtesy of Charmed Labs
Gigapan viewer demonstration
gigapan.org
Zoomgigapan.org
Margarita
Structure of
Technology
October
4, 1957
“San Antonio is
Moon : Mars City.
First man to walk on
Mars will be from
San Antonio.“90+ Years Old: Kane,
Sinkin and Dr. ...
What trends
are placing
pressure on
education
and
educators to
change?
v
GlobalS&T
Demography
http://www.3dnworld.com/users/1/images/UltimateEarth.jpg
Talk Story
Maui Community
College, April 2008
“We are seeing brain drain
fluctuate between 21%
and 44%.”
--Jeanne Unemori Skog and Leslie Wilkins,
medb
The number of jobs
requiring technical
training is growing at
five times the rate of
other occupations.
Innovate America, ...
“We need to prepare a
high tech workforce or we
will have to import workers
from the outside.”
--Mayor Charmain Tavares, M...
“There is hidden poverty in Maui…”
“The Indian reservation on the
mainland is like home—I see
poverty, alcohol abuse, drug...
“There are kids on Maui
who have never been to
the top of the mountain or
to Hana much less have
they traveled off of the
...
The key 21st
Century issues:
war, environmental
degradation, globalization,
population explosion,
hunger, poverty and the…
The key 21st
Century issues:
…competitiveness of the
military, companies, students
and workers.
“I do not think Maui is any
different than the
mainland…post
industrialization has
placed greater demands
on math and educ...
Nueva
era
Era
Industrial
ERA INFO
Cambio-Histórico,
Económico & Social
?
Adapted from Charles Ostman
Senior Fellow
Institute for Global Futures
NEURO NANO
BIOINFO
S&T Convergence
Informática Biología
QuímicaFísica
Ingeniería
Scientific and Technological Convergence
http://www.3dnworld.com/users/1/images/UltimateEarth.jpg
“Ahupua’a”
Integrated, wholistic system
“Ho’ohanalima”
Learning by doing
Waipulani
Longitudinal Algae
Research Project –
Kihei Charter School
The Maui Coastal Land Trust restoration of a 250 acre Waihe’e Coastal
.
Environmental impact study during the reconstruction of Koie’ie
Fishpond located in north Kihei– Kihei Charter School
Makena Hawaiian Green Sea Turtle Fibropapiloma Virus Study– Kihei
Charter School
Opihi Population Health Assessment Research Study– Kihei Charter
School
Transdisciplinary
Systemics
Transdisciplinarity…
Theoretical
Knowledge
Applied Learning
Real world
problem or
opportunity
“We need to strengthen
teachers…connect
learning and doing…the
world is changing…it’s OK
to learn with your
students.”
–Ro...
“We need to
integrate and expand
CTE systematically.”
--Bruce Henderson, Superintendant,
CAS, Maui
Forecasting
Bettersworth
www.kurzweilai.net/.../ SIN_headshot_highres.html
“porque
estamos
duplicando el
ritmo de
progreso cada
década,
veremos un
...
Nanotechnology Fuel Cells Homeland Security
ADM, Hybrid, MEMS,
Computer Forensics Wireless: M2M Mechatronics
Home Technolo...
forecasting.tstc.edu
Digital Convergence
4th
Generation Computing
Mechatronics
21st
Century Architecture
(Harbor Research, 2003)
(Harbor Research, 2003)
1994 - 2004
(Harbor Research, 2003)
(Harbor Research, 2003)
2004 - 2014
http://www.nasa.gov/multimedia/imagegallery/image_feature_598.html
Qué es esto?
Mi hija, Ava Marie
4a
GEN
http://www-bsac.eecs.berkeley.edu/archive/users/warneke-brett/SmartDust/
Berkeley’s Golem Dust
11.7 mm3 total circumscribe...
http://shino8.eng.uci.edu/Pdf/Tomo_MIT_Mems.pdfintel-research.net/ berkeley/features/tiny_db.asp
Berkeley Motes
/berkeley....
http://www.welectronics.com/gsm/Nokia/Nokia_3220.HTML
What is
this?
http://www.outsidethetent.com/wp/archives/category/white-house/
http://shino8.eng.uci.edu/Pdf/Tomo_MIT_Mems.pdf
intel-research.net/ berkeley/features/tiny_db.asp
/berkeley.intel-research...
http://www.msnbc.msn.com/id/7643818/
Qué es esto?
http://www.adidas.com/campaigns/adidas_1/content/downloads/adidas_1-
wp_02_1280_1024.jpg
http://www.adidasprlookbook.com/a...
Home Technology
Construction
Patent thin-nickel-strip
magneto-strictive sensor
(MsS™). Applicable to
airplanes, ships, plants,
pipelines a...
Security and Process Control
SCADA $3.1 B (2004) to over $4 B (2007).
SCADA security software to grow by 50%
annually thro...
Utilities
A California study indicates that peak-rate usage can be shaved by 20
percent if utilities used Automated Meter ...
1. Surge of start-up companies, attributable
to the legacy telecom slowness to
innovate.
2. Cross appropriation of industr...
1. Surge of start-up companies, attributable
to the legacy telecom slowness to
innovate.
2. Cross appropriation of industr...
Digital Convergence
4th
Generation Computing
Mechatronics
21st
Century Architecture
Mecatrónica
La combinación
sinergística de la
ingeniería
mecánica, la
ingeniería eléctrica,
la ingeniería de
“software”, l...
If you have an automobile made in the past 10
years, your car has more computing power than
rockets used to put man on the...
http://www.xpcarteam.com/
XP Vehicle Systems
Features: Over 2500 mile range using our patented XPack Multi-Core(TM) power ...
http://www.toyota.com/prius/index.html?s_van=GM_TN_HYBRID_PRIUS
Qué es esto?
http://www.toyota.com/prius/index.html?s_van=GM_TN_HYBRID_PRIUS
Soy un Robot
Mecatrónica
La combinación
sinergística de la
ingeniería
mecánica, la
ingeniería eléctrica,
la ingeniería de
“software”, l...
Máquinas
Inteligentes
PRIUS+ team: we built the first PRIUS+ conversion Sept 11-22, 2004, starting with a low-cost
lead-acid battery pack. Pictu...
http://www.calcars.org/photos.html
1,000 MPG eq. Fuel Cell Car
Los Altos Academy of
Engineering, La Puente Valley
ROP, California
http://bleex.me.berkeley.edu/CV/Berkeley-Exo-HR.jpg
100-pound
exoskeleton
and a 70-
pound
backpack
while feeling
as if he ...
http://www.terremoto.ca/images/exoskeleton.jpg
Hal 3 may
some day
replace the
wheel chair
for many
people..
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Wireless_capsule_endoscopy
Video Camera en una Pildora
Soy un Robot
http://www.rsc.org/ej/LC/2006/b507312j/b507312j-f2.gif
http://www.rsc.org/ejga/LC/2006/b507312j-ga.gif
Un Laboratorio En U...
Digital Convergence
4th
Generation Computing
Mechatronics
21st
Century Architecture
Bio-Mecatrónica
La combinación
sinergística de la
Biología, la
ingeniería
mecánica, la
ingeniería eléctrica,
la ingeniería...
MIT Tech Review, 2005
Sensors
Physical
Chemical
Biological
http://www.rieti.go.jp/en/events/bbl/03102801.pdf , page 16
Act...
Nanobiónica
Bacteria Atada
Bacterua Nadadora
Velocidad de natación ~ 20-30 µm
Protones flux/motor ~ 1200 proton/rev
Bacter...
University of Texas at San Antonio
Technical applications of biological molecules
including protein-based materials, DNA-based
materials, biomineralization, ...
Bio-Mecatrónica
La combinación
sinergística de la
Biología, la
ingeniería
mecánica, la
ingeniería eléctrica,
la ingeniería...
Micro-robotics team and biologists at Tsukuba University
Source: The Guardian
Date: 2 May 2002
State University of New Yor...
Physicians are using
VNS from last 10 years
to treat epilepsy to slash
seizures till upto 40
percent. October 2005
study r...
https://www.carle.com/Hospital/about/images/Ear%20Diagram3.jpg
Bio-Mecatrónica
The goal is to create artificial "biohybrid" limbs that
merge man-made components with human tissue
-- muscles, skeletal a...
Necesita
-mos
pensar
más allá
de éstos
v
v
http://web.mit.edu/nanoengineering/research/microfab.shtml
Micro-Mecatrónica
ORNL, esta imagen muestra una
nanosonda, con una punta 1,000 veces más
fina que un cabello humano, penetrando
una célula. ...
Un glóbulo rojo artificial – el
respirocito [41]. Diseñador Robert A.
Freitas Jr. ©1999 Forrest Bishop.
http://www.imminst...
Adapted from NSFNEURO NANO
BIOINFO
21st
Century Architecture
Adapted from Charles Ostman
Senior Fellow
Institute for Global Futures
NEURO NANO
BIOINFO
S&T Convergence
Informática Biología
QuímicaFísica
Ingeniería
Scientific and Technological Convergence
Transdisciplinarios
Piensa
& Haz
Cómo nos
organizamos?
Transdisciplinarity
Beyond the disciplines
Engaging the real world
Learning connected to doing
Solving real world problems...
Transdisciplinarity…
Theoretical
Knowledge
Applied Learning
Real world
problem or
opportunity
Era
Industrial
ERA INFO
Cambio-Histórico,
Económico & Social
?
Nueva
era
Era
Industrial
ERA INFO
Cambio-Histórico,
Económico & Social
Era
Cibernética
?
Cybernetics is the discipline that studies and creates
communication and control systems in living organisms
and in the ma...
Evolution of the cognitive and
physical division of labor between
Humans and Machines
Mars
And beyond
Structure of
Technology
BREAK
Part I
Where did you leave off yesterday?
What will you learn today?
What is the one problem or opportunity
you really wan...
TEAMS
ORGANIZATION
Who are you?
Color Dots
Disciplines – Group network in
TEAMS of 7.
What are your disciplines?
Vote on large post it and th...
You
promise
me I/We take
responsibility for our
learning and what is
possible for us today
as a individuals and
TEAMS.
I promise
you By the end of the day we will all
answer your questions of Maze
by example and we will come to
a sense of cl...
Please
help me
In order to accomplish all that is
possible we have a need for
speed-lightness of foot-today.
Let’s treat t...
Where are we
going?
Mars
And beyond
MARGARITA
Mission to Mars
Theoretical
Knowledge
Applied Learning
Real world
problem or
opportunity
Part I
Where did you leave off yesterday?
What will you learn today?
What is the one problem or opportunity
you really wan...
Part II
Technopolis (Kozmetsky)
TEAMS Forecasting Tools (Bettersworth)
Example Technology Flows
DACUM
Example Technology...
LUNCH & BUS
Assignment
Sit in teams and with team
members on bus and at lunch.
Please complete the following
assignment.
TEAMS TASK 3
Mission
Zero Time
(Lunch & Bus Ride)
TEAMS TASK 3
Mission
Zero Time
What is the one problem
or opportunity you really
want to work on? 1, 2, 3
Transdisciplinarity…
Theoretical
Knowledge
Applied Learning
Real world
problem or
opportunity
TEAMS
REPORT
Answer questions at lunch
Prioritize 1, 2, 3
Facilitators - When you return from
lunch, write your 1, 2, 3 on...
TEAMS TASK 3
Mission
Zero Time
What is the one problem
or opportunity you really
want to work on? 1, 2, 3
TEAM Lead - When...
LUNCH
TEAMS TASK 3
Mission
Zero Time
What is the one problem
or opportunity you really
want to work on? 1, 2, 3
Facilitators - W...
LUNCH
Return
TEAMS
REPORT
Survey all answers and place a dot
by the topics you feel the most
strongly about… Please do not vote
on your...
TEAMS
REPORT
Survey all answers and place a dot
by the topics you feel the most
strongly about… Please do not vote
on your...
Where are
you?
What do Mt.
Rushmore,
Aerobics, the
Human Genome
and the
Loch
Ness
Monster
have in
GUTZON
BORGLUM
August 10, 1927
Father of AerobicsKenneth H. Cooper, M.D., M.P.H.
Dr. Susan Naylor
& Dawn K Garcia
“Initial
sequencing and
analysis of the
human genome”
Dr. Susan Naylor
Feb. 12, 2001,
Jou...
SwRI
SFBR
Founder
Thomas Baker
Slick Jr. -
businessman,
inventor,
oilman,
rancher,
engineer,
philanthropist,
peacemaker,
a...
SwRI
SFBR
Tom Slick:
Monster
Hunter
Staring:
Nicolas Cage
Tom Slick Professorship of World Peace at the University of Texa...
What defines
San Antonio?
What does it
mean to be a
San Antonian?
CACI
Northrop
Grumman
Lockheed
Martin
General
Electric
Pratt &
Whitney
Chromalloy
Proxtronics
Veridian
Mitre
OnBoard
Soft
...
Missions
San Jose
San Juan
Espada
Concepci
on
Alamo &
Frontier Legends
What single
technological
event altered
San Antonio’s
economic and
historic
trajectory
forever?
First Aero
Squadron, Old #
1
1910
• 1910 First military man to
teach himself to fly
• Only person to ever learn
to fly by ...
Star Film Ranch
1910 Georges Méliès
"Viaje a la luna"
1927
First Academy Award Film
Tom Slick founded
SwRI in 1947 on
Cable Ranch, 1,200
acres, 2MM feet of
labs and facilities,
$350 million in
contract rese...
Jet Age
Office of History
San Antonio Air Logistics
Center
Kelly Air Force Base
“Great
White
Way”
B-47
B-58
Hustler
B-52
1...
Technicians
Technologists
PhDs
Rise of the Hispanic
Middle Class
”Mayor” -- Nelson
Pemmaraju Rao,
SFBR
Cancer Research:
immunodignostic area of
steroid hormones
Cancer
1958 - 2005
Hall of Fame
1961 - 2002
William A. Mallow, SwRI
1963
“This Nation
has tossed its
cap over the
wall of space,
and we have
no choice but
to follow it.”
--John F. Kennedy,
N...
Lt.
Colonel
Edward
White
Pilot for
Gemini 4,
which was a
66-
revolution,
4-day
mission
June 3 - 7,
1965.
1965
John Taboada, Ph.D.
Taboada Research Instruments, Inc.
1979
- 2005
10 patents that have changed the
world
Cut the number who die from
herart disease in half annually.
Julio C. Palmaz, M.D.
...
Star Wars: Episode 2,
Harry Potter and the
Prisoner of Azkaban, Lord
of the Rings, The Passion
of the Christ, Spider-Man 2...
2005
HEB
Grande Communications
International Bank of Commerce
Center for Disease Control
American Cancer Society
Mastercar...
SwRI, Training, Simulation
and Performance
Improvement
AETC Holodeck
Northrop
Grumman
2005
INFO UP
BIO
NANO
COGNO
SCIENCE
ARTS
“Roughly 100
million jobs…
cross-disciplinary
fields.” NII, Business Week,
10.11.2004
...
William Barker, BBN & Data Race
Widely circulated photo of
the IMP Team (L to R):
Truett Thatch, Bill Bartell
(Honeywell),...
CACI
Northrop
Grumman
Lockheed
Martin
General
Electric
Pratt &
Whitney
Chromalloy
Proxtronics
Veridian
Mitre
OnBoard
Soft
...
ITSA
Roosevelt PREP
ITSA
Greg White,
UTSA: ”K-
PhD”
PipelineStartyounger!
SaySi!
Brigadier
General Robert
F. McDermott
RETIRED
"when the economic
history of San Antonio in
the 1980s is written, the
most ...
“San Antonio is
Moon : Mars City.
First man to walk on
Mars will be from
San Antonio.“
1957 - 2005
90+ Years Old: Kane,
Si...
Mars
And beyond
Transdisciplinarios
Piensa
& Haz
Cómo nos
organizamos?
Transdisciplinarity
Beyond the disciplines
Engaging the real world
Learning connected to doing
Solving real world problems...
Transdisciplinarity…
Theoretical
Knowledge
Applied Learning
Real world
problem or
opportunity
What system of
technologies, are
needed to
accomplish your
mission?
Mecatrónica
La combinación
sinergística de la
ingeniería
mecánica, la
ingeniería eléctrica,
la ingeniería de
“software”, l...
Bio-Mecatrónica
La combinación
sinergística de la
Biología, la
ingeniería
mecánica, la
ingeniería eléctrica,
la ingeniería...
Mecatrónica
Fusión Educativa
Instrumentation Electronics Control SystemsMechanical
Instrumentation Electronics Control SystemsBiotechnology
Bio-Instrumentación
Fusión Educativa
Energía Alternativa
Fuel Cell, Wind Energy, Combined Heat and Power
Instrumentation Electronics Control SystemsMechanical
...
Tecnología Doméstica
Information
Technology
Electronics Control SystemsMechanical
Fusión Educativa
What system of
technologies, are
needed to
accomplish your
mission?
“Turbine Techs earn
$28-$40K a year… Many
techs earning $40K -
$80K a year with OT.”
– Bryan Gregory, Jr.
11.1.2006, TSTC ...
“In most industries
you have
electricians,
mechanics and IT, in
wind, you are
expected to do
everything.”
-- Bryan Gregory...
Mecatrónica
La combinación
sinergística de la
ingeniería
mecánica, la
ingeniería eléctrica,
la ingeniería de
“software”, l...
Job
Mergers
Adapted from NSFNEURO NANO
BIOINFO
21st
Century Architecture
NEURO NANO
BIOINFO
Adapted from NSF
21st
Century Architecture
National Center for Agricultural Utilization Research
Bio-Mecatrónica
La combinación
sinergística de la
Biología, la
ingeniería
mecánica, la
ingeniería eléctrica,
la ingeniería...
Greener Pathways, White and
Walsh, The Apollo Alliance, 2008
Green
Jobs
Wind Jobs
GreenerPathways,WhiteandWalsh,TheApolloAlliance,2008
“We are the first bio-diesel company in the US.”
–Kelly Takaya King, Co-Founder, Pacific BioDiesel
Ethanol and Bio Diesel Jobs
GreenerPathways,WhiteandWalsh,TheApolloAlliance,2008
National Center for Agricultural Utilization Research
“In 2006, demand was off the charts.
Every graduate had a job 6 months
before graduation. Chemical
Technology Graduates ty...
Mechatronics
Jobs
Butler Community College
April 7 to 11, 2008
“It used to be the
sledgehammer
mechanic. These days,
the technology has
advanced so much that
our most important tool
is ...
“Tolerances
are getting
tighter and
tighter…”
–Patrick
Peronnet
“Manufacturing
is increasingly
more
automated—
electronics,
motors,
controls,
robots and
scheduling.”
--ATS,
PeoriaTSTC We...
www.af.mil/news/airman/0104/launch1b.html
“Production
Engineers [from
TSTC] start at $43K-
$57K per year at
United Launch
...
“Aviation
Technicians
qualify for two
pay raises per
year of $1.00
per hour
topping out at
$54K per year.”
–Harvey Hall,
A...
“Entry-level
machinists make
$36K-$37K.
They top out at
$60K but they
can earn
overtime and up
to $7,500 per
year for coll...
Butler Community College
April 7 to 11, 2008
Frontier El Dorado
Refining Company
Operator
$40K - $60K
Instrumentation
$40K...
“….we had to upgrade our basic
mechanic skills to include
programmable logic controllers and
electrical systems.”
--Dr. Ro...
Entry-Level R&D Tech
$40,000-to-$50,000
4.16.2007, TSTC Waco
Specialized
Knowledge &
Skills
Systems
Knowledge &
Skills
Next Gen Jobs
GM Train
Unskilled
Operators
Highly
Skilled
Operators
Employment
Environment
Butler Community College
April 7 to 11, 2008
Spirit
AeroSystems
“1,000 workers a
year needed for
the aerospace
cluster… 2,...
Butler Community College
April 7 to 11, 2008
Spirit AeroSystems
Machine Operator
Starting - $26,000
2 years -- $32,000
8 y...
Frontier El Dorado Refining,
Butler Community College
April 7 to 11, 2008
Tolerances are getting tighter and tighter, we need
people who can work with their heads and their hands.
“In this plant, in
the next three
years we will need
nine
Instrumentation
and Numerical
Control (INC)
technicians.”
Edward...
Chief Master Sergeant David Wilson, Kansas Air National Guard
Kansas Air National Guard,
Butler Community College
April 7 ...
Kansas Air National Guard,
Butler Community College
April 7 to 11, 2008
Kansas Air National Guard,
Butler Community College
April 7 to 11, 2008
Kansas Air National Guard,
Butler Community College
April 7 to 11, 2008
Kansas Air Naitonal Guard,
Butler Community College
April 7 to 11, 2008
Kansas Air National Guard,
Butler Community College
April 7 to 11, 2008
Kansas Air National Guard,
Butler Community College
April 7 to 11, 2008
http://www.itsdocs.fhwa.dot.gov/JPODOCS/REPTS_TE/13599.htmltp://www.roadtraffic-technology.com/contractors/traffic_man/ele...
Skill Mergers
?
Define one or more job
titles and job tasks to
to accomplish your
mission?
Informática Biología
QuímicaFísica
Ingeniería
Scientific and Technological Convergence
What knowledge
systems and
disciplines are needed
to accomplish your
mission?
Analysis and
Conclusions
STEM
Mergers
Dr. David Thornburg, Center for
Professional Development and
Jim Brazell, VentureRAMP, Inc.
ARTS
Creativity-
Innovation
-D...
Mecatrónica
La combinación
sinergística de la
ingeniería
mecánica, la
ingeniería eléctrica,
la ingeniería de
“software”, l...
Mechatronics - Robotics
• Electronics & Applied Computer Equipment
• Biotechnology, Life Science & Medical
• Telecommunica...
Bio-Mecatrónica
La combinación
sinergística de la
Biología, la
ingeniería
mecánica, la
ingeniería eléctrica,
la ingeniería...
NEURO NANO
BIOINFO
Adapted from NSF
21st
Century Architecture
Job
Mergers
Medium to High Pay
Jobs
Knowledge
Jobs
Skill
Jobs
Next
Gen
Jobs
Academic
Mergers
Med-to-High Skill and
Professional Jobs
General
Academics
Technical –
Workforce Ed
Next
Gen
Ed
What tasks and steps will
your team/s need to
accomplish its mission? Use
DACUM linear model.
Realize the process is a
spi...
What human behavior,
tools and equipment and
future trends do you need
to accomplish your
mission?
Part II Revised
Technopolis (Kozmetsky)
TEAMS Forecasting Tools (Bettersworth)
Example Technology Flows
DACUM
Example Te...
Maryland
Comprehensive
Liberal Arts,
STEM and CTE
Model
Maryland Classroom: CTE: Educating Tomorrow’s
Workforce Today, April 2008
Maryland Classroom: CTE: Educating Tomorrow’s
Workforce Today, April 2008
Maryland Classroom: CTE: Educating
Tomorrow’s Workforce Today, April 2008
What knowledge
systems and
disciplines are needed
to accomplish your
mission?
TEAMS Model Schools
• High degree of faculty
interaction
• Integrated curricula
• Sequenced courses HS, CTC
and University...
Contextual
Theoretical Applied
TEAMS
1,000 MPG eq. Fuel Cell Car
Los Altos Academy of
Engineering, La Puente Valley
ROP, California
Transdisciplinary
Theoretical +
Applied + Real
WorldProblems
K-12
CTC – Workforce &
Technical Programs
University
Employers
Industry, Government, Military
and Civil Society
Environmen...
K-12
CTC –
Workforce &
Technical
Programs
University
Employers
Industry, Government, Military
and Civil Society
Environmen...
bioCollege Pathway
TSTC Harlingen
Machining & Industrial Systems
Science Fiction to Reality
TSTC System & TSTC Harlingen
H...
bio
Jobs Pathway
Bell Helicopter, Dallas, TX
Machinist
Science Fiction to Reality
TSTC System & TSTC Harlingen
Harlingen &...
Talk Story
Maui Community College
Maui, HI
April 13-20, 2008
K-12 Pathway
Kihei Charter School
Environmental impact study during the
reconstruction of Koie’ie
Talk Story
Maui Communit...
K-12 Pathway
Maui Community College
Space Systems Summer Camp
Talk Story
Maui
Community
College
Maui, HI
April 13-18,
2008...
College Pathway
Maui Community College
Electronics & Computer
Engineering Technology (ECET)
Talk Story
Maui
Community
Coll...
Jobs Pathway
OceanIT
Opto-Mechatronics Technician
Talk Story
Maui
Community
College
Maui, HI
April 13-18,
2008
Integrated
...
College Pathway
Butler Community College & Wichita State Engineering
Industrial Systems
Wichita Next
Butler Community Coll...
Jobs Pathway
DJ Engineering
Production Engineer & Machinist
Wichita Next
Butler Community College
Butler County, El Dorado...
Super Clusters
K-12 Pathway
Orlando Tech
Film, Animation & Digital Media Design
Convergence
Technopolei
Digital Media Alliance
Florida (D...
University Pathway
Florida Interactive Entertainment Academy
Film, Animation & Digital Media Design
Convergence
Technopole...
Jobs Pathway
Cinematographer
Orlando & I-35 Corridor, FL
Convergence
Technopolei
Digital Media Alliance
Florida (DMAF) &
B...
Game Builders
Goldberg’s Crew, Houston Community College
GAME TEAMS
Los juegos han
capturado la
imaginación y tiempo
de milenios.
Apalancar la economía
de atención de los
juegos p...
Mecatrónica
La combinación
sinergística de la
ingeniería
mecánica, la
ingeniería eléctrica,
la ingeniería de
“software”, l...
ITSA
ITSA
Greg White, UTSA:
”K-PhD”
PipelineStartyounger!
Primaria
Equipos
ESPACIALES
San Antonio,TX
Competencia de
Robots
más exploración
profesional y
académica e historia
de la ...
Equipos
ESPACIALES
San Antonio,TX
Educación Media
Cerebro del Juego
de Video Gameboy
Sistema de Visión
Actuadores Lego y
Bloques de
Construcción
US First-EISD
Andrew
Schuetze
San Antonio,TX
High School
Academia de Verano de los Equipos Espaciales
Bio-Mecatrónica
La combinación
sinergística de la
Biología, la
ingeniería
mecánica, la
ingeniería eléctrica,
la ingeniería...
LA LIGA FIRST LEGO® REVELA EL RETO 2006 NANO QUEST
Más de 80,000 estudiantes de educación media en 34 países
exploran el d...
“resolver problemas
e inventar cosas
nunca antes
consideradas
posibles”
LA LIGA FIRST LEGO® REVELA EL RETO 2006 NANO QUEST
Informática Biología
QuímicaFísica
Ingeniería
Scientific and Technological Convergence
Mars
And beyond
What kind of youth
programs and ed
programs will you need
to create to deliver the
human capability for
the mission?
Tools & Techniques
Some stories,
Socratic dialogue
and some thinking-
doing tools…
And a mode shift to
doing…
…a shift to
transdisciplinarity…
Transdisciplinarios
Piensa
& Haz
Cómo nos
organizamos?
Transdisciplinarity
Beyond the disciplines
Engaging the real world
Learning connected to doing
Solving real world problems...
Transdisciplinarity…
Theoretical
Knowledge
Applied Learning
Real world
problem or
opportunity
You
promise
me I/We take
responsibility for our
learning and what is
possible for us today
as a individuals and
TEAMS.
I promise
you By the end of the day we will all
answer your questions of Maze
by example and we will come to
a sense of cl...
Mission to Mars
Theoretical
Knowledge
Applied Learning
Real world
problem or
opportunity
Mars
And beyond
Transdisciplinarity…
Theoretical
Knowledge
Applied Learning
Your Mars
Mission
Stories
Identity – Name – Logo
Mission – Problem and/or opportunities
Technology Flow
Job Titles
Job Tasks
Job Tools
Job Knowledge...
Technology
Flow
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  • http://todayinspacehistory.wordpress.com/2007/10/04/october-4-1957-the-russians-launch-sputnik/
    LG SPUT IMAGE
    « October 3, 1962 - Sigma 7 launches into orbit, Mercury-Atlas 8
    October 5, 1929 - Astronaut Richard Gordon, Jr., is born »
    Ads by GoogleSputnik
    Huge selection, great deals on
    Sputnik items.
    Yahoo.com3D Earth Screensaver
    Watch Realistic Animated 3D Earth
    On Your Desktop. Free Download!
    www.CrawlerTools.com/3DEarth
    The modern space age was birthed on October 4, 1957 when the Soviet’s launched the first man-made object to orbit the Earth, Sputnik.
    Wikipedia says:
    “Sputnik 1 was launched on October 4, 1957. The satellite was 58 cm (about 23 in) in diameter and weighed approximately 83.6 kg (about 183 lb). Each of its elliptical orbits around the Earth took about 96 minutes. Monitoring of the satellite was done by Amateur radio operators. The first long-range flight of the R-7 booster used to launch it had occurred on August 21 and was described in Aviation Week. Sputnik 1 was not visible from Earth but the casing of the R-7 booster, traveling behind it, was.”
    Quotes:
    “Both countries [Russia and the United States] knew that preeminence in space was a condition of their national security. That conviction gave both countries a powerful incentive to strive and compete. The Soviets accomplished many important firsts, and this gave us a great incentive to try harder.
    The space program also accomplished another vital function in that it kept us out of a hot war. It gave us a way to compete technologically, compete as a matter of national will. It may have even prevented World War III, with all the conflict and fighting focused on getting to the moon first, instead of annihilating each other. There’s no evidence of that, but as eyewitness to those events, I think that’s what happened.”
    - American astronaut Scott Carpenter quoted in Into that Silent Sea (p. 138).
    ___________________
    www.globalsecurity.org/.../imint/u-2_tt.htm
    U-2 Product
    SS-6 / Sputnik Launch Pad, Baikonur
    TOP of LAUNCH
    IMAGE
    Sputnik on the launch pad being prepared for liftoff
    However, another event that occurred in the Soviet Union in 1960 is generally recognized as the single greatest disaster in the history of rocketry. The event was not directly related to manned space flight, but to the development of an intercontinental ballistic missile (ICBM). In the early days of space flight, both the US and Soviet space programs were very much intertwined with the development of ICBMs. These vehicles were designed to launch nuclear warheads over great distances, leaving no part of the world safe from the threat of nuclear destruction. However, the technologies pioneered for these weapons of war served a secondary purpose of providing the first generation of rockets for space exploration.
    Sputnik on the launch pad being prepared for liftoff
    In fact, the early flights of Sputnik and Yuri Gagarin in the USSR as well as those of Explorer I and John Glenn in the US were all conducted using modified ballistic missiles. The primary Soviet launch vehicle of the period was the R-7 rocket, modified versions of which are still used even today for most Russian space flights. The R-7 was originally developed as an ICBM under the direction of Sergei Korolev, the Soviet Union's pre-eminent rocket designer of the day. The R-7 successfully completed a number of test flights between 1957 and 1959, including launching the first two artificial satellites. While only four examples of the R-7 were ever deployed as ballistic missiles from 1960 to 1968, the same basic design has remained in use throughout the Russian space program. Modern variants of the R-7 continue to launch satellites as well as manned Soyuz flights, and the type had achieved a success rate of nearly 98% in over 1,600 launches by the year 2000.
    _____________
    Apollo 17
    http://www.phys.ncku.edu.tw/~astrolab/mirrors/apod/ap031109.html
    Apollo 17 _ 1
    http://xpda.com/junkmail/junk162/GPN-2000-001876.jpg
    Apollo 17 _ 2
    Apollo 17 launch, December 17, 1972:
    http://xpda.com/junkmail/junk162/junk162.htm
    Mars
    http://whyfiles.org/194spa_travel/images/mars.gif
    Moon
    http://www.rc-astro.com/php/phpthumb/cache/phpThumb_cache_rc-astro.com_srcfadbb9057f0dac8e921d1bffc3590ce0_par0ddf367c5f01d9ba090bf356b6761f52_dat1168633826.jpeg
    Kennedy
    http://www.historicaldocuments.com/JohnFKennedysLastSpeech.gif
    November 21, 1963
    Dedication Ceremony of the New Facilities of the School of
    Aerospace Medicine at Brooks Air Force Base, Texas
    http://www.historicaldocuments.com/JohnFKennedysLastSpeech.htm
    SPACE TEAMS
    MCD
    KANE
    Toursit
    Russian
    http://science.qj.net/Microsoft-billionaire-joins-ISS-bound-Russian-space-flight/pg/49/aid/88814
    U.S. software mogul Charles Simonyi became the world's fifth space tourist - "space flight participant," as officials call them - to go into orbit. Simonyi, who helped developed Microsoft Word, paid US$ 25M for the opportunity to join the crew of the Russian spacecraft Soyuz TMA-10.
    The 58-year-old Hungary-born billionaire is making a 12-day round trip to the International Space Station (ISS). Joining him on the trip were Russian cosmonauts Fyodor Yurchikhin and Oleg Kotov of the 15th ISS crew. The spacecraft Simonyi and the Russian cosmonauts lifted off from the Bainokur Cosmodrome in Kazakhstan at 11:31 P.M. local time (1:31 P.M. EDT). They are due to dock with the ISS on Monday.
    Simonyi will be treating the current occupants of the ISS to a gourmet meal three days after arriving at the space station. The meal will be held in honor of Cosmonauts' Day, the Russian holiday commemorating Yuri Gagarin's historic 1961 space flight. Everybody else mentioned who prepared the meal so we won't. Suffice to say, she's famous, knows her way around a house, and looked good in orange.
    In this Associated Press photo: In this image made from NASA-TV, U.S. billionaire Charles Simonyi, front row right, flips upside down during a news conference after he, Fyodor Yurchikhin, left, and Russian cosmonaut Oleg Kotov, front center, docked at the international space station Monday, April 9, 2007. A Russian-built Soyuz capsule carrying the American billionaire who helped develop Microsoft Word docked at the international space station late Monday, to the earthbound applause of Martha Stewart and others at Mission Control. In the back row, Commander Michael Lopez-Alegria can be seen. (AP Photo/NASA TV)
    ___________
    Tito
    http://cache.viewimages.com/xc/1310822.jpg?v=1&c=ViewImages&k=2&d=17A4AD9FDB9CF1939057D9939C83F106174681002B4CEC415A5397277B4DC33E
    MIR
    http://solarsystem.nasa.gov/people/images/inset-LucidS-5-large.jpg
    http://csatweb.csatolna.hu/tagok/csa/mars/rover.jpg
    RICHS TECHNOLOGY CAMERA - BODY
    HAWKING
    http://gozerog.com/images/Hawking_001.jpg
    Public Domain. Suggested credit: NASA or National Aeronautics and Space Administration via pingnews.
    KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- Noted physicist Stephen Hawking (center) enjoys zero gravity during a flight aboard a modified Boeing 727 aircraft owned by Zero Gravity Corp. (Zero G). Hawking, who suffers from amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (also known as Lou Gehrig's disease) is being rotated in air by (right) Peter Diamandis, founder of the Zero G Corp., and (left) Byron Lichtenberg, former shuttle payload specialist and now president of Zero G. Kneeling below Hawking is Nicola O'Brien, a nurse practitioner who is Hawking's aide. At the celebration of his 65th birthday on January 8 this year, Hawking announced his plans for a zero-gravity flight to prepare for a sub-orbital space flight in 2009 on Virgin Galactic's space service. Additional information from source:
    No copyright protection is asserted for this photograph. If a recognizable person appears in this photograph, use for commercial purposes may infringe a right of privacy or publicity. It may not be used to state or imply the endorsement by NASA employees of a commercial product, process or service, or used in any other manner that might mislead. Accordingly, it is requested that if this photograph is used in advertising and other commercial promotion, layout and copy be submitted to NASA prior to release.
    Source Physicist Stephen Hawking in Zero Gravity (NASA)
    Date April 27, 2007 at 22:11
    Zero Gravity's price tag for the daylong tour is $2,950, which includes preflight training and a postflight party.
    From the Go Zero G Website:
    The once-in-a-lifetime opportunity to fly like Superman can now be yours. Train with an expert coach, board our specially modified aircraft, G-FORCE ONE, and experience the unforgettable.
    Experience zero gravity the only way possible without going to space. Parabolic flight is the same method NASA has used to train its astronauts for the last 45 years and the same way Tom Hanks floated in Apollo 13.
    Book a seat on one of our regular flights conveniently based in Las Vegas, Nevada and at the Kennedy Space Center, near Orlando, Florida. The aircraft is also available for charter flights anywhere in the United States for groups, incentive trips, parties or team building.
    http://todayinspacehistory.wordpress.com/2007/10/04/october-4-1957-the-russians-launch-sputnik/
    LG SPUT IMAGE
    « October 3, 1962 - Sigma 7 launches into orbit, Mercury-Atlas 8October 5, 1929 - Astronaut Richard Gordon, Jr., is born »October 4, 1957 - the Russian’s launch Sputnik
    Ads by GoogleSputnik
    Huge selection, great deals on
    Sputnik items.
    Yahoo.com3D Earth Screensaver
    Watch Realistic Animated 3D Earth
    On Your Desktop. Free Download!
    www.CrawlerTools.com/3DEarth
    The modern space age was birthed on October 4, 1957 when the Soviet’s launched the first man-made object to orbit the Earth, Sputnik.
    Wikipedia says:
    “Sputnik 1 was launched on October 4, 1957. The satellite was 58 cm (about 23 in) in diameter and weighed approximately 83.6 kg (about 183 lb). Each of its elliptical orbits around the Earth took about 96 minutes. Monitoring of the satellite was done by Amateur radio operators. The first long-range flight of the R-7 booster used to launch it had occurred on August 21 and was described in Aviation Week. Sputnik 1 was not visible from Earth but the casing of the R-7 booster, traveling behind it, was.”
    Quotes:
    “Both countries [Russia and the United States] knew that preeminence in space was a condition of their national security. That conviction gave both countries a powerful incentive to strive and compete. The Soviets accomplished many important firsts, and this gave us a great incentive to try harder.
    The space program also accomplished another vital function in that it kept us out of a hot war. It gave us a way to compete technologically, compete as a matter of national will. It may have even prevented World War III, with all the conflict and fighting focused on getting to the moon first, instead of annihilating each other. There’s no evidence of that, but as eyewitness to those events, I think that’s what happened.”
    - American astronaut Scott Carpenter quoted in Into that Silent Sea (p. 138).
    ___________________
    www.globalsecurity.org/.../imint/u-2_tt.htm
    U-2 Product
    SS-6 / Sputnik Launch Pad, Baikonur
    TOP of LAUNCH
    IMAGE
    Sputnik on the launch pad being prepared for liftoff
    However, another event that occurred in the Soviet Union in 1960 is generally recognized as the single greatest disaster in the history of rocketry. The event was not directly related to manned space flight, but to the development of an intercontinental ballistic missile (ICBM). In the early days of space flight, both the US and Soviet space programs were very much intertwined with the development of ICBMs. These vehicles were designed to launch nuclear warheads over great distances, leaving no part of the world safe from the threat of nuclear destruction. However, the technologies pioneered for these weapons of war served a secondary purpose of providing the first generation of rockets for space exploration.
    Sputnik on the launch pad being prepared for liftoff
    In fact, the early flights of Sputnik and Yuri Gagarin in the USSR as well as those of Explorer I and John Glenn in the US were all conducted using modified ballistic missiles. The primary Soviet launch vehicle of the period was the R-7 rocket, modified versions of which are still used even today for most Russian space flights. The R-7 was originally developed as an ICBM under the direction of Sergei Korolev, the Soviet Union's pre-eminent rocket designer of the day. The R-7 successfully completed a number of test flights between 1957 and 1959, including launching the first two artificial satellites. While only four examples of the R-7 were ever deployed as ballistic missiles from 1960 to 1968, the same basic design has remained in use throughout the Russian space program. Modern variants of the R-7 continue to launch satellites as well as manned Soyuz flights, and the type had achieved a success rate of nearly 98% in over 1,600 launches by the year 2000.
    _____________
    Apollo 17
    http://www.phys.ncku.edu.tw/~astrolab/mirrors/apod/ap031109.html
    Apollo 17 _ 1
    http://xpda.com/junkmail/junk162/GPN-2000-001876.jpg
    Apollo 17 _ 2
    Apollo 17 launch, December 17, 1972:
    http://xpda.com/junkmail/junk162/junk162.htm
    Mars
    http://whyfiles.org/194spa_travel/images/mars.gif
    Moon
    http://www.rc-astro.com/php/phpthumb/cache/phpThumb_cache_rc-astro.com_srcfadbb9057f0dac8e921d1bffc3590ce0_par0ddf367c5f01d9ba090bf356b6761f52_dat1168633826.jpeg
    Kennedy
    http://www.historicaldocuments.com/JohnFKennedysLastSpeech.gif
    November 21, 1963
    Dedication Ceremony of the New Facilities of the School of
    Aerospace Medicine at Brooks Air Force Base, Texas
    http://www.historicaldocuments.com/JohnFKennedysLastSpeech.htm
    SPACE TEAMS
    MCD
    KANE
    Toursit
    Russian
    http://science.qj.net/Microsoft-billionaire-joins-ISS-bound-Russian-space-flight/pg/49/aid/88814
    U.S. software mogul Charles Simonyi became the world's fifth space tourist - "space flight participant," as officials call them - to go into orbit. Simonyi, who helped developed Microsoft Word, paid US$ 25M for the opportunity to join the crew of the Russian spacecraft Soyuz TMA-10.
    The 58-year-old Hungary-born billionaire is making a 12-day round trip to the International Space Station (ISS). Joining him on the trip were Russian cosmonauts Fyodor Yurchikhin and Oleg Kotov of the 15th ISS crew. The spacecraft Simonyi and the Russian cosmonauts lifted off from the Bainokur Cosmodrome in Kazakhstan at 11:31 P.M. local time (1:31 P.M. EDT). They are due to dock with the ISS on Monday.
    Simonyi will be treating the current occupants of the ISS to a gourmet meal three days after arriving at the space station. The meal will be held in honor of Cosmonauts' Day, the Russian holiday commemorating Yuri Gagarin's historic 1961 space flight. Everybody else mentioned who prepared the meal so we won't. Suffice to say, she's famous, knows her way around a house, and looked good in orange.
    In this Associated Press photo: In this image made from NASA-TV, U.S. billionaire Charles Simonyi, front row right, flips upside down during a news conference after he, Fyodor Yurchikhin, left, and Russian cosmonaut Oleg Kotov, front center, docked at the international space station Monday, April 9, 2007. A Russian-built Soyuz capsule carrying the American billionaire who helped develop Microsoft Word docked at the international space station late Monday, to the earthbound applause of Martha Stewart and others at Mission Control. In the back row, Commander Michael Lopez-Alegria can be seen. (AP Photo/NASA TV)
    ___________
    Tito
    http://cache.viewimages.com/xc/1310822.jpg?v=1&c=ViewImages&k=2&d=17A4AD9FDB9CF1939057D9939C83F106174681002B4CEC415A5397277B4DC33E
    MIR
    http://solarsystem.nasa.gov/people/images/inset-LucidS-5-large.jpg
    http://csatweb.csatolna.hu/tagok/csa/mars/rover.jpg
    RICHS TECHNOLOGY CAMERA - BODY
    HAWKING
    http://gozerog.com/images/Hawking_001.jpg
    Public Domain. Suggested credit: NASA or National Aeronautics and Space Administration via pingnews.
    KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- Noted physicist Stephen Hawking (center) enjoys zero gravity during a flight aboard a modified Boeing 727 aircraft owned by Zero Gravity Corp. (Zero G). Hawking, who suffers from amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (also known as Lou Gehrig's disease) is being rotated in air by (right) Peter Diamandis, founder of the Zero G Corp., and (left) Byron Lichtenberg, former shuttle payload specialist and now president of Zero G. Kneeling below Hawking is Nicola O'Brien, a nurse practitioner who is Hawking's aide. At the celebration of his 65th birthday on January 8 this year, Hawking announced his plans for a zero-gravity flight to prepare for a sub-orbital space flight in 2009 on Virgin Galactic's space service. Additional information from source:
    No copyright protection is asserted for this photograph. If a recognizable person appears in this photograph, use for commercial purposes may infringe a right of privacy or publicity. It may not be used to state or imply the endorsement by NASA employees of a commercial product, process or service, or used in any other manner that might mislead. Accordingly, it is requested that if this photograph is used in advertising and other commercial promotion, layout and copy be submitted to NASA prior to release.
    Source Physicist Stephen Hawking in Zero Gravity (NASA)
    Date April 27, 2007 at 22:11
    Zero Gravity's price tag for the daylong tour is $2,950, which includes preflight training and a postflight party.
    From the Go Zero G Website:
    The once-in-a-lifetime opportunity to fly like Superman can now be yours. Train with an expert coach, board our specially modified aircraft, G-FORCE ONE, and experience the unforgettable.
    Experience zero gravity the only way possible without going to space. Parabolic flight is the same method NASA has used to train its astronauts for the last 45 years and the same way Tom Hanks floated in Apollo 13.
    Book a seat on one of our regular flights conveniently based in Las Vegas, Nevada and at the Kennedy Space Center, near Orlando, Florida. The aircraft is also available for charter flights anywhere in the United States for groups, incentive trips, parties or team building.
  • Vitality and Maverick Spirit. Can do as ….
  • The Age of Spiritual Machines – When Computers Exceed Human Intelligence
    The Singularity Is Near : When Humans Transcend Biology
  • As early as 1999, the number of embedded microprocessors found in the average middle-class household in North America was 45 and the number of embedded microprocessors manufactured surpassed the number of microprocessors packaged inside of traditional computers such as PCs by a factor of 100 to 1 (Lewis, 2001, p. 1).
  • As early as 1999, the number of embedded microprocessors found in the average middle-class household in North America was 45 and the number of embedded microprocessors manufactured surpassed the number of microprocessors packaged inside of traditional computers such as PCs by a factor of 100 to 1 (Lewis, 2001, p. 1).
  • As early as 1999, the number of embedded microprocessors found in the average middle-class household in North America was 45 and the number of embedded microprocessors manufactured surpassed the number of microprocessors packaged inside of traditional computers such as PCs by a factor of 100 to 1 (Lewis, 2001, p. 1).
  • As early as 1999, the number of embedded microprocessors found in the average middle-class household in North America was 45 and the number of embedded microprocessors manufactured surpassed the number of microprocessors packaged inside of traditional computers such as PCs by a factor of 100 to 1 (Lewis, 2001, p. 1).
  • The goal of the Smart Dust project is to build a self-contained, millimeter-scale sensing and communication platform for a massively distributed sensor network.  This device will be around the size of a grain of sand and will contain sensors, computational ability, bi-directional wireless communications, and a power supply, while being inexpensive enough to deploy by the hundreds.  The science and engineering goal of the project is to build a complete, complex system in a tiny volume using state-of-the art technologies (as opposed to futuristic technologies), which will require evolutionary and revolutionary advances in integration, miniaturization, and energy management.  We forsee many applications for this technology:
    Weather/seismological monitoring on Mars
    Internal spacecraft monitoring
    Land/space comm. networks
    Chemical/biological sensors
    Weapons stockpile monitoring
    Defense-related sensor networks
    Inventory Control
    Product quality monitoring
    Smart office spaces
    Sports - sailing, balls
    For more information, see the main Smart Dust page at http://robotics.eecs.berkeley.edu/~pister/SmartDust and read our publications (see navigation button above).
    Brief description of the operation of the mote:
    The Smart Dust mote is run by a microcontroller that not only determines the tasks performed by the mote, but controls power to the various components of the system to conserve energy. Periodically the microcontroller gets a reading from one of the sensors, which measure one of a number of physical or chemical stimuli such as temperature, ambient light, vibration, acceleration, or air pressure, processes the data, and stores it in memory. It also occasionally turns on the optical receiver to see if anyone is trying to communicate with it. This communication may include new programs or messages from other motes. In response to a message or upon its own initiative the microcontroller will use the corner cube retroreflector or laser to transmit sensor data or a message to a base station or another mote.
    Longer description of the operation of the mote:
    The primary constraint in the design of the Smart Dust motes is volume, which in turn puts a severe constraint on energy since we do not have much room for batteries or large solar cells. Thus, the motes must operate efficiently and conserve energy whenever possible. Most of the time, the majority of the mote is powered off with only a clock and a few timers running. When a timer expires, it powers up a part of the mote to carry out a job, then powers off. A few of the timers control the sensors that measure one of a number of physical or chemical stimuli such as temperature, ambient light, vibration, acceleration, or air pressure. When one of these timers expires, it powers up the corresponding sensor, takes a sample, and converts it to a digital word. If the data is interesting, it may either be stored directly in the SRAM or the microcontroller is powered up to perform more complex operations with it. When this task is complete, everything is again powered down and the timer begins counting again.
    Another timer controls the receiver. When that timer expires, the receiver powers up and looks for an incoming packet. If it doesn't see one after a certain length of time, it is powered down again. The mote can receive several types of packets, including ones that are new program code that is stored in the program memory. This allows the user to change the behavior of the mote remotely. Packets may also include messages from the base station or other motes. When one of these is received, the microcontroller is powered up and used to interpret the contents of the message. The message may tell the mote to do something in particular, or it may be a message that is just being passed from one mote to another on its way to a particular destination. In response to a message or to another timer expiring, the microcontroller will assemble a packet containing sensor data or a message and transmit it using either the corner cube retroreflector or the laser diode, depending on which it has. The corner cube retroreflector transmits information just by moving a mirror and thus changing the reflection of a laser beam from the base station. This technique is substantially more energy efficient than actually generating some radiation. With the laser diode and a set of beam scanning mirrors, we can transmit data in any direction desired, allowing the mote to communicate with other Smart Dust motes.
  • M2M is a category of Information and Computing Technology (ICT) that combines network, computer, software, sensor and power technologies to enable remote human and machine interaction with physical, chemical and biological systems and processes. M2M has many synonyms including “pervasive computing”, “hidden computing”, “invisible computing” and “ubiquitous computing.”
    Reach out and touch someone or squeeze someone or…An accelerometer on the wrist-worn device allows rough detection of hand orientation, gesture measurement, and tapping. In the near future researchers will examine simple activity detection as well, such as sitting, walking, and standing.
    As in the bus stop example, a person wearing the device can sense simple touching. This sensation is enabled through force-sensing resistors that provide pressure detection over a high-resolution surface array on the top of the device.
    A person can also detect rich signals sent from a partner whirling a finger along the surface of his or her device. Researchers provided this effect by time stamping the sensed data.
    Motes, such as the one amongst the candy corn above, are at the heart of several Intel research projects. 
    Not only might a wearer experience the simulated touch of a friend, she might also feel the device grow warm to her skin. Using a Peltier Junction, the device can create a subtle heating or cooling on the wearer’s skin.
    “The mapping between the inputs and outputs of paired devices is not literal,” says Paulos. “This is an important part of the design. In the same way people developed a language of numbers around early pagers when they sent messages we believe a similar vocabulary will emerge around physical cues.”
    For example, to some wearers a gentle warming on the skin might convey a message of friendship. Others might choose to send good vibes by…well by sending good vibes, literally. Intel researchers used simple flat pancake vibration motors to cause wearers to easily and privately feel vibrations though skin contact. Various vibration patterns and duty cycles provide a number of output possibilities for the device.
    And for those times when good vibes just aren’t enough, a wearer of the device can send the equivalent of a wireless handhold, an electronic squeeze.
    Through the use of Flexinol, a user can feel a little squeeze that mimics the grasp of a hand as the filament in the wrist-worn device contracts when electrically powered. Flexinol is a simple variant of Nitinol, which is often used in robotic applications and commonly referred to as “muscle wire” for its ability to exert force and return to its original shape.
    For all the pleasant thoughts and human analogies there may be a dark side to this device. “Imagine someone incessantly tapping, tapping, tapping. You’d probably feel really annoyed,” says Paulos. “It could be your friend trying to get in touch with you. Or perhaps you’re on the receiving end of a lovers’ quarrel.”
    “Yea,” says Paulos, “there is an eerie side to this device. I don’t think anyone want to know what spam feels like.”
  • M2M is a category of Information and Computing Technology (ICT) that combines network, computer, software, sensor and power technologies to enable remote human and machine interaction with physical, chemical and biological systems and processes. M2M has many synonyms including “pervasive computing”, “hidden computing”, “invisible computing” and “ubiquitous computing.”
    Reach out and touch someone or squeeze someone or…An accelerometer on the wrist-worn device allows rough detection of hand orientation, gesture measurement, and tapping. In the near future researchers will examine simple activity detection as well, such as sitting, walking, and standing.
    As in the bus stop example, a person wearing the device can sense simple touching. This sensation is enabled through force-sensing resistors that provide pressure detection over a high-resolution surface array on the top of the device.
    A person can also detect rich signals sent from a partner whirling a finger along the surface of his or her device. Researchers provided this effect by time stamping the sensed data.
    Motes, such as the one amongst the candy corn above, are at the heart of several Intel research projects. 
    Not only might a wearer experience the simulated touch of a friend, she might also feel the device grow warm to her skin. Using a Peltier Junction, the device can create a subtle heating or cooling on the wearer’s skin.
    “The mapping between the inputs and outputs of paired devices is not literal,” says Paulos. “This is an important part of the design. In the same way people developed a language of numbers around early pagers when they sent messages we believe a similar vocabulary will emerge around physical cues.”
    For example, to some wearers a gentle warming on the skin might convey a message of friendship. Others might choose to send good vibes by…well by sending good vibes, literally. Intel researchers used simple flat pancake vibration motors to cause wearers to easily and privately feel vibrations though skin contact. Various vibration patterns and duty cycles provide a number of output possibilities for the device.
    And for those times when good vibes just aren’t enough, a wearer of the device can send the equivalent of a wireless handhold, an electronic squeeze.
    Through the use of Flexinol, a user can feel a little squeeze that mimics the grasp of a hand as the filament in the wrist-worn device contracts when electrically powered. Flexinol is a simple variant of Nitinol, which is often used in robotic applications and commonly referred to as “muscle wire” for its ability to exert force and return to its original shape.
    For all the pleasant thoughts and human analogies there may be a dark side to this device. “Imagine someone incessantly tapping, tapping, tapping. You’d probably feel really annoyed,” says Paulos. “It could be your friend trying to get in touch with you. Or perhaps you’re on the receiving end of a lovers’ quarrel.”
    “Yea,” says Paulos, “there is an eerie side to this device. I don’t think anyone want to know what spam feels like.”
  • The current deployment of wireless instruments for SHM is very limited; however, the market potential is very large. The civil infrastructure of the US includes nearly 80 billion square feet of commercial and government facilities and buildings, and more than 100 billion square feet of dams and bridges. Most of these assets are exposed and sparsely monitored for rapid and reliable assessment of vulnerabilities and detection of damage (Sensametrics, 2003, p. 1).
    Rehabilitation, renewal, replacement and maintenance of this infrastructure is estimated to require expenditures of at least one trillion dollars nationwide (Elgamal, et al, n.d., p. 1). Sensametrics has calculated the aggregate market potential to be $50 billion” (Technology Ventures Corporation, n.d., p. 1).
  • Wireless M2M sensor networks and process control systems are expected to be areas of significant growth. Demand for Radio Frequency (RF) Modules used for industrial monitoring and control was approximately 1.9 million units in 2004 and is expected to climb to 165 million units in 2010 (Legg, 2004, p.1).
    Market research firm Frost & Sullivan has projected the industrial wireless sensors market to move from $24 million in 2001 to over $100 million in annual sales in 2008 (Donoho, 2002, p. 1). Further, “the market for Supervisory Control and Data Acquisition (SCADA) systems are projected to grow from $3.1 billion in 2004 to over $4 billion by 2007. As most M2M networks lack adequate security, the SCADA security software market is expected to grow by 50% annually through 2007” (Kuykendall, 2004, p. 1).
  • More than 25 million AMR units installed on gas (21 percent), water (11 percent), and electric utility (16 percent) meters. 9 million units shipped in 2002 with a total meter market of 200 million units yet to be changed out to AMR (Jackson, 2004, p. 1).
    A California study indicates that peak-rate usage can be shaved by 20 percent if utilities used Automated Meter Reading (ARM) for accurate pricing information--each megawatt of reduction can equate to $400,000 in savings per year (Jackson, 2004, p. 1) saving California utilities and consumers at least $5 billion a year.
  • ., all integrated through the design process. The key to success in mechatronics is: modeling, analysis, experimentation & hardware-implementation skills.
  • ., all integrated through the design process. The key to success in mechatronics is: modeling, analysis, experimentation & hardware-implementation skills.
  • Lab-in-a-Pill – Revolutionising Bowel Cancer Screening
    Sector: Medical Devices
    Technology
    --------------------------------------------------------------------------------
    In the western world, colorectal cancer is now the third most frequent cancer and the second most common cause of cancer deaths. In the US nearly 150,000 new cases are being diagnosed each year and more than 56,000 people died from the disease in 2002. In the UK, where a national screening campaign will be implemented across the 20m population over 50, around 15,000 people die from the disease each year.
    Current screening techniques are notoriously inaccurate, leading to many false positives which saturate resources available for follow-up diagnosis. But scientists at Glasgow University have pioneered a new sensor technology, Lab-in-a-Pill, that could have major impact on the cost and effectiveness of bowel cancer treatment.
    At the core of Lab-in-a-Pill is a miniaturised sensor, processing and communications module all enclosed in a chemical-resistant capsule which currently measures around 3cm x 1cm in prototype form.
    The Lab-in-a-Pill module, which would be sent to all individuals being screened, incorporates a multi-sensor array which includes a blood test. The pill is able to detect blood as it travels through the bowel, transmitting the real time measurements to a small external module worn under a patch attached to the body.
    After one, or more pills have been swallowed over the required screening period, the patch is returned for the measured data to be assessed at the screening centre. So the pills themselves do not have to be recovered making the screening process much more acceptable. And because it measures the location of bleeding Lab-in-a-Pill can identify, more effectively, those individuals who are most at risk.
    The Lab-in-a-Pill concept, currently undergoing in-vitro trials, overcomes the critical difficulties with the current screening scheme which is based on individuals collecting stool samples. Major benefits include:
    • improved compliance and screening response rate with elimination of sample collection
    • reduced false positives and improved sensitivity through measurement at the source of bleeding
    So Lab-in-a-Pill reduces the pressure on valuable national resources by eliminating the need for central screening laboratories and ensuring only at-risk patients are referred for colonoscopy.
    IP Status
    --------------------------------------------------------------------------------
    The intellectual property associated with this technology belongs to the University of Glasgow.
    The University of Glasgow is always keen to hear from potential collaborative partners and welcomes interest from genuine parties. If you would like further information about this technology or this area of research please complete the following form and we will get back to you via telephone or email within two working days.
    Enquiry Form
    http://www.innovativelicences.com/index.cfm/page/licensesandtechnologies/technologyid/48
  • ., all integrated through the design process. The key to success in mechatronics is: modeling, analysis, experimentation & hardware-implementation skills.
  • ., all integrated through the design process. The key to success in mechatronics is: modeling, analysis, experimentation & hardware-implementation skills.
  • http://www.nidcd.nih.gov/health/hearing/coch.htm
    What is a cochlear implant?
    Credit: NIH Medical ArtsEar with Cochlear implant. View larger image.A cochlear implant is a small, complex electronic device that can help to provide a sense of sound to a person who is profoundly deaf or severely hard-of-hearing. The implant consists of an external portion that sits behind the ear and a second portion that is surgically placed under the skin (see figure). An implant has the following parts:
    A microphone, which picks up sound from the environment.
    A speech processor, which selects and arranges sounds picked up by the microphone.
    A transmitter and receiver/stimulator, which receive signals from the speech processor and convert them into electric impulses.
    An electrode array, which is a group of electrodes that collects the impulses from the stimulator and sends them to different regions of the auditory nerve.
    An implant does not restore normal hearing. Instead, it can give a deaf person a useful representation of sounds in the environment and help him or her to understand speech.
    Top
    How does a cochlear implant work?
    A cochlear implant is very different from a hearing aid. Hearing aids amplify sounds so they may be detected by damaged ears. Cochlear implants bypass damaged portions of the ear and directly stimulate the auditory nerve. Signals generated by the implant are sent by way of the auditory nerve to the brain, which recognizes the signals as sound. Hearing through a cochlear implant is different from normal hearing and takes time to learn or relearn. However, it allows many people to recognize warning signals, understand other sounds in the environment, and enjoy a conversation in person or by telephone.
    Top
    Who gets cochlear implants?
    Credit: Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC)
    Children and adults who are deaf or severely hard-of-hearing can be fitted for cochlear implants. According to the Food and Drug Administration’s (FDA’s) 2005 data, nearly 100,000 people worldwide have received implants. In the United States, roughly 22,000 adults and nearly 15,000 children have received them.
    Adults who have lost all or most of their hearing later in life often can benefit from cochlear implants. They often can associate the sounds made through an implant with sounds they remember. This may help them to understand speech without visual cues or systems such as lipreading or sign language.
    Cochlear implants, coupled with intensive postimplantation therapy, can help young children to acquire speech, language, developmental, and social skills. Most children who receive implants are between two and six years old. Early implantation provides exposure to sounds that can be helpful during the critical period when children learn speech and language skills. In 2000, the FDA lowered the age of eligibility to 12 months for one type of cochlear implant.
    Top
    How does someone receive a cochlear implant?
    Use of a cochlear implant requires both a surgical procedure and significant therapy to learn or relearn the sense of hearing. Not everyone performs at the same level with this device. The decision to receive an implant should involve discussions with medical specialists, including an experienced cochlear-implant surgeon. The process can be expensive. For example, a person’s health insurance may cover the expense, but not always. Some individuals may choose not to have a cochlear implant for a variety of personal reasons. Surgical implantations are almost always safe, although complications are a risk factor, just as with any kind of surgery. An additional consideration is learning to interpret the sounds created by an implant. This process takes time and practice. Speech-language pathologists and audiologists are frequently involved in this learning process. Prior to implantation, all of these factors need to be considered.
    Top
    What does the future hold for cochlear implants?
    With advancements in technology and continued follow-up studies with people who already have received implants, researchers are evaluating how cochlear implants might be used for other types of hearing loss.
    NIDCD is supporting research to improve upon the benefits provided by cochlear implants. It may be possible to use a shortened electrode array, inserted into a portion of the cochlea, for individuals whose hearing loss is limited to the higher frequencies. Other studies are exploring ways to make a cochlear implant convey the sounds of speech more clearly. Researchers also are looking at the potential benefits of pairing a cochlear implant in one ear with either another cochlear implant or a hearing aid in the other ear.
  • http://www.robotdirectory.org/pics/cakemonster/Nano-Scoop3.jpg
  • We are designing and fabricating an electromechanical device for manipulation and electrical probing of nano-scale objects (Figures 1 and 2). The device consists of micro-scale flexures and actuators that generate nano-scale motion; and nano-scale structure that interact with the nano world. Our device is designed to work in conjunction with the AFM and will be used to image the sample as well.
    Currently there is no versatile, practical experimental tool for use at this scale. Our goal is to have a cheap and consistently reproducible experimental device. Hence, we are designing this device to be completely batch fabricated start to finish. Despite the lack of batch lithography at this scale, we have developed unique processes that allow for nano-scale feature size and single nano-scale pitch using standard microfabrication.
    To ensure consistency between our nano-tweezers, we have developed self compensating devices that can withstand a range of process and subsequent structure variations and still provide the same performance characteristics. This robust design method also has extensive utility in other commercial MEMs applications where repeatability of performance and reliability are essential.
  • ORNL nanoprobe creates world of new possibilities
         ORNL researcher Tuan Vo-Dinh expects big things from the nanoprobe. OAK RIDGE, Tenn., July 14, 2004 — A technology with proven environmental, forensics and medical applications has received a shot in the arm because of an invention by researchers at the Department of Energy's Oak Ridge National Laboratory.
    ORNL's nanoprobe, which is based on a light scattering technique, can detect and analyze chemicals, explosives, drugs and more at a theoretical single-molecule level. This capability makes it far more selective and accurate than conventional competing technologies.
    The probe is an optical fiber tapered to a tip measuring 100 nanometers with an extremely thin coating of nanoparticles of silver, which induces the surface-enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) effect. Normally, when a sample is illuminated by a laser beam, there is a small reflection of light, known as Raman scattering. The light shows vibration energies, which are unique to each compound, and that information allows scientists to identify the substance.
    With the SERS nanoprobe, the laser light creates rapid oscillations of the electrons in the silver nanoparticles, which produce an enormous electromagnetic field that contributes to increase the Raman scattering signal. The ORNL nanoprobe works with any surface to induce the SERS effect.
    "The significance of this work is that we are now able to perform direct analysis of samples -- even dry samples -- with no preparation of the surface," said ORNL's Tuan Vo-Dinh, who leads a team that developed the nanoprobe. "Also, the small scale of the nanoprobe demonstrates the potential for detection in nanoscale environments, such as at the intracellular level."
    Ordinarily, surface-enhanced Raman scattering analysis of samples on a surface requires modification or treatment of the sample. This may consist of physically removing the sample and diluting it in a liquid containing silver nanoparticles; however, this practice is unnecessary with the ORNL nanoprobe.
    Vo-Dinh and Life Sciences Division colleagues David Stokes and Zhenhuan Chi experimented with nanoprobes made of several materials of varying thickness. They settled on silver-island films because they are easier to reproduce than silver-coated particles and they form only a thin coating, which helps maintain the nanoscale diameter of the tapered tip.
    The development of the SERS nanoprobe could lead to increasing interest in SERS as an ultra-sensitive detection tool, allowing direct analysis of samples for a wide variety of applications, Vo-Dinh said. These applications range from environmental monitoring to intracellular sensing and medical diagnostics.
    ORNL is managed by UT-Battelle for the Department of Energy. Funding for the project was provided by DOE's Office of Biological and Environmental Research and the Laboratory Directed Research and Development program.
    ORNL's nanobiosensor technology gives new access to living cell’s molecular processes
    OAK RIDGE, April 27, 2004 -- Researchers at the Department of Energy's Oak Ridge National Laboratory have developed a nanoscale technology for investigating biomolecular processes in single living cells. The new technology enables researchers to monitor and study cellular signaling networks, including the first observation of programmed cell death in a single live cell. The "nanobiosensor" allows scientists to physically probe inside a living cell without destroying it. As scientists adopt a systems approach to studying biomolecular processes, the nanobiosensor provides a valuable tool for intracellular studies that have applications ranging from medicine to national security to energy production.
    ORNL Corporate Fellow and Life Sciences Division researcher Tuan Vo-Dinh leads a team of researchers who are developing the nanoscale technology. "This research illustrates the integrated 'nano-bio-info' approach to investigating and understanding these complex cell systems," Vo-Dinh said. "There is a need to explore uncharted territory inside a live cell and analyze the molecular processes. This minimally invasive nanotechnology opens the door to explore the inner world of single cells".
    ORNL's work was most recently published in the Journal of the American Chemical Society and has appeared in a feature article of the journal Nature. Members of Vo-Dinh's research team include postdoctoral researchers Paul M. Kasili, Joon Myong Song and research staff biochemist Guy Griffin.
    The group's nanobiosensor is a tiny fiber-optic probe that has been drawn to a tip of only 40 nanometers (nm) across--a billionth of a meter and 1,000 times smaller than a human hair. The probe is small enough to be inserted into a cell.
    Immobilized at the nanotip is a bioreceptor molecule, such as an antibody, DNA or enzyme that can bind to target molecules of interest inside the cell. Video microscopy experiments reveal the minimally invasive nature of the nanoprobe in that it can be inserted into a cell and withdrawn without destroying it.
    Because the 40-nm diameter of the fiber-optic probe is much narrower than the 400-nm wavelength of light, only target molecules bound to the bioreceptors at the tip are exposed to and excited by the evanescent field of a laser signal.
    "We detect only the molecules that we target, without all the other background 'noise' from the myriad other species inside the cell. Only nanoscale fiber-optics technology can provide this capability," said Vo-Dinh.
    ORNL's technology gives molecular biologists an important systems biology approach of studying complex systems through the nano-bio-info route. Conventional analytical methods--electron microscopy or introducing dyes, for example--have the disadvantage of being lethal to the cell.
    "The information obtained from conventional measurements is an average of thousands or millions of cells," said Vo-Dinh. "When you destroy cells to study them, you can't obtain the dynamic information from the whole live cell system. You get only pieces of information. Nanosensor technology provides a means to preserve a cell and study it over time within the entire cell system."
    The ability to work with living cells opens a new path to obtaining basic information critical to understanding the cell's molecular processes. Researchers have a new tool for understanding how toxic agents are transported into cells and how biological pathogens trigger biological responses in the cell.
    Vo-Dinh's team recently detected the biochemical components of a cell-signaling pathway, apoptosis. Apoptosis is a key process in an organism's ability to prevent disease such as cancer. This programmed cell-death mechanism causes cells to self-destruct before they can multiply and introduce disease to the organism.
    "When a cell in our body receives insults such as toxins or inflammation and is damaged, it kills itself. This is nature's way to limit and stop propagation of many diseases such as cancer," said Vo-Dinh. "For the first time we've seen apoptosis occur within a single living cell."
    Apoptosis triggers a host of tell-tale enzyme called caspases. Vo-Dinh's team introduced a light-activated anti-cancer drug into cancer cells. They then inserted the fiberoptic nanoprobe with a biomarker specific for caspase-9 attached to its tip. The presence of caspase-9 caused cleavage of the biomarker from the tip of the nanobiosensor. Changes in the intensity of the biomarker's fluorescence revealed that the light-activated anti-cancer drug had triggered the cell-death machinery.
    "The nanobiosensor has many other applications for looking at how cells react when they are treated with a drug or invaded by a biological pathogen. This has important implications ranging from drug therapy development to national security, environmental protection and a better understanding of molecular biology at a systems level," said Vo-Dinh. "This area of research is truly at the nexus of nanotechnology, biology and information technology."
    The research was supported by ORNL's laboratory-directed research and development program and by the DOE Office of Biological and Environmental Research in the Office of Science. ORNL is managed by UT-Battelle for the Department of Energy.
    ###
    NOTE TO EDITORS:
    You may read other press releases from Oak Ridge National Laboratory or learn more about the lab at http://www.ornl.gov/news.
    [ Print Article | E-mail Article | Close Window ]  
    News Release
    Media Contact: Bill CabageCommunications and External Relations865.574.4399 ORNL’s nanobiosensor technology gives new access to living cell’s molecular processes
         This image shows a nanoprobe, with a tip 1,000 times finer than a human hair, penetrating a cell. The probe can enter, perform a measurement in situ and be withdrawn without destroying the cell. The nanobiosensor technology provides researchers who study cell systems at the molecular level a valuable tool for monitoring the health of a single cell. OAK RIDGE, Tenn., April 27, 2004 — Researchers at the Department of Energy's Oak Ridge National Laboratory have developed a nanoscale technology for investigating biomolecular processes in single living cells. The new technology enables researchers to monitor and study cellular signaling networks, including the first observation of programmed cell death in a single live cell.
    The "nanobiosensor" allows scientists to physically probe inside a living cell without destroying it. As scientists adopt a systems approach to studying biomolecular processes, the nanobiosensor provides a valuable tool for intracellular studies that have applications ranging from medicine to national security to energy production.
    ORNL Corporate Fellow and Life Sciences Division researcher Tuan Vo-Dinh leads a team of researchers who are developing the nanoscale technology. "This research illustrates the integrated ‘nano-bio-info' approach to investigating and understanding these complex cell systems," Vo-Dinh said. "There is a need to explore uncharted territory inside a live cell and analyze the molecular processes. This minimally invasive nanotechnology opens the door to explore the inner world of single cells".
    ORNL's work was most recently published in the Journal of the American Chemical Society and has appeared in a feature article of the journal Nature. Members of Vo-Dinh's research team include postdoctoral researchers Paul M. Kasili, Joon Myong Song and research staff biochemist Guy Griffin.
    The group's nanobiosensor is a tiny fiber-optic probe that has been drawn to a tip of only 40 nanometers (nm) across—a billionth of a meter and 1,000 times smaller than a human hair. The probe is small enough to be inserted into a cell.
    Immobilized at the nanotip is a bioreceptor molecule, such as an antibody, DNA or enzyme that can bind to target molecules of interest inside the cell. Video microscopy experiments reveal the minimally invasive nature of the nanoprobe in that it can be inserted into a cell and withdrawn without destroying it.
    Because the 40-nm diameter of the fiber-optic probe is much narrower than the 400-nm wavelength of light, only target molecules bound to the bioreceptors at the tip are exposed to and excited by the evanescent field of a laser signal.
    "We detect only the molecules that we target, without all the other background ‘noise' from the myriad other species inside the cell. Only nanoscale fiber-optics technology can provide this capability," said Vo-Dinh.
    ORNL's technology gives molecular biologists an important systems biology approach of studying complex systems through the nano-bio-info route. Conventional analytical methods—electron microscopy or introducing dyes, for example—have the disadvantage of being lethal to the cell.
    "The information obtained from conventional measurements is an average of thousands or millions of cells," said Vo-Dinh. "When you destroy cells to study them, you can't obtain the dynamic information from the whole live cell system. You get only pieces of information. Nanosensor technology provides a means to preserve a cell and study it over time within the entire cell system."
    The ability to work with living cells opens a new path to obtaining basic information critical to understanding the cell's molecular processes. Researchers have a new tool for understanding how toxic agents are transported into cells and how biological pathogens trigger biological responses in the cell.
    Vo-Dinh's team recently detected the biochemical components of a cell-signaling pathway, apoptosis. Apoptosis is a key process in an organism's ability to prevent disease such as cancer. This programmed cell-death mechanism causes cells to self-destruct before they can multiply and introduce disease to the organism.
    "When a cell in our body receives insults such as toxins or inflammation and is damaged, it kills itself. This is nature's way to limit and stop propagation of many diseases such as cancer," said Vo-Dinh. "For the first time we've seen apoptosis occur within a single living cell."
    Apoptosis triggers a host of tell-tale enzyme called caspases. Vo-Dinh's team introduced a light-activated anti-cancer drug into cancer cells. They then inserted the fiberoptic nanoprobe with a biomarker specific for caspase-9 attached to its tip. The presence of caspase-9 caused cleavage of the biomarker from the tip of the nanobiosensor. Changes in the intensity of the biomarker's fluorescence revealed that the light-activated anti-cancer drug had triggered the cell-death machinery.
    "The nanobiosensor has many other applications for looking at how cells react when they are treated with a drug or invaded by a biological pathogen. This has important implications ranging from drug therapy development to national security, environmental protection and a better understanding of molecular biology at a systems level," said Vo-Dinh. "This area of research is truly at the nexus of nanotechnology, biology and information technology."
    The research was supported by ORNL's laboratory-directed research and development program and by the DOE Office of Biological and Environmental Research in the Office of Science. ORNL is managed by UT-Battelle for the Department of Energy.
  • Painting, Stagecoach, Menger Hotel
    Sculpture, Apache Pursued (replica) &
    Monument to Trail Drivers,
    Witte Museum
    BORGLUM, JOHN GUTZON DE LA MOTHE (1867-1941)
    Guts-un Borg-lum
    Painting, Stagecoach, Menger Hotel
    Sculpture, Apache Pursued, replica Witte Museum
    Monument to Trail Drivers, Witte Museum
    masters, the most important of whom was Auguste Rodin
    Lived in Menger
    Mount Rushmore National Memorial, South Dakota, of Washington, Jefferson, Lincoln, and Theodore Roosevelt. These were dedicated on August 10, 1927, and completed, after Borglum's death, by his son Lincoln.
    In 1925 the sculptor moved to Texas to work on the monument to trail drivers commissioned by the Trail Drivers Association.qv He completed the model in 1925, but due to lack of funds it was not cast until 1940, and then was only a fourth its originally planned size. It stands in front of the Texas Pioneer and Trail Drivers Memorial Hall next to the Witte Museum in San Antonio. Borglum lived at the historic Menger Hotel, which in the 1920s was the residence of a number of artists.
  • http://www.cooperaerobics.com/Corporate/BioKenCooper.aspx
    Google: http://www.google.com/search?hl=en&lr=&q=Father+of+Aerobics+Aerospace
    During his 13 years of military service, Dr. Cooper served as director of the Aerospace Medical Laboratory in San Antonio and worked with the National Aeronautics Space Administration in conditioning America's astronauts for space. He developed the 12-minute fitness test and the Aerobics Point System, which today are used by the Army, Navy, Secret Service, several foreign military organizations, many U.S. and foreign corporations, and more than 2,500 universities and public schools. In 1966 he received certification from the American Board of Preventive Medicine, an indication of the direction he was headed. Two years after the publication of Aerobics (Bantam, 1968) Lieutenant Colonel Cooper resigned from the U.S. Air Force to explore the relationship between exercise and health and longevity full time.
    Founder, President, and CEO—The Cooper Aerobics Center
    When Kenneth H. Cooper, M.D., M.P.H., published his first bestseller, Aerobics, in 1968, he introduced a new word and a new concept to America. Millions of people started exercising, motivated by his preventive medicine research, persuasive public appearances, and a series of inspiring books. In short, a young Air Force physician who had once been a track star in his native Oklahoma had started a worldwide fitness revolution.
    Born in Oklahoma City on March 4, 1931, Ken Cooper was the son of a dentist father, and a mother who always cheered him on at track meets and other athletic competitions. Choosing medicine over missionary work, his other calling, he received a B.S. degree in 1952 from University of Oklahoma and an M.D. degree in 1956 from University of Oklahoma School of Medicine. His master of public health degree was earned from Harvard School of Public Health in 1962 while still an Air Force flight surgeon stationed in Texas.
    From the time of his first book in 1968, Dr. Cooper has advocated revolutionizing the field of medicine away from disease treatment to disease prevention through aerobic exercise. The Cooper philosophy, "It is easier to maintain good health through proper exercise, diet, and emotional balance than to regain it once it is lost," has been proven valid in scientific research. Still receiving dozens of citations every year is The Cooper Institute's 1989 landmark study, published in the renowned Journal of the American Medical Association, showing the relationship between fitness and mortality in some 13,000 patients.
    Recognized for more than three decades as the leader of the international physical fitness movement, Dr. Cooper is credited with motivating more people to exercise in pursuit of good health than any other person. At The Cooper Aerobics Center, as president and CEO, Dr. Cooper is supported by a 400-person staff in carrying out his mission to educate and encourage optimum health in as many segments of the population as possible. Dr. Cooper sets an example for maintaining a healthy lifestyle by exercising at the Center on a regular basis, and his wife Millie, daughter Berkley, and son Tyler may also be seen coopering.
  • Chromosome 3, the third largest of the human chromosomes, accounts for 7 percent of a person’s entire genetic blueprint. Increased knowledge of the genome is changing the face of disease prevention, diagnosis and treatment.
    “In our Health Science Center labs, we have proven that a gene on Chromosome 3 is linked to ovarian cancer,” Dr. Naylor said. “We are working with many types of genes, including several that suppress formation of various cancers and others that are involved in bone development. Scientists worldwide come to us because we are the resource, the clearinghouse, for information on Chromosome 3.”
    The genome, composed of an amazing primordial acid called DNA, is found in the center of every cell. More complex than the most sophisticated computer software, DNA programs the biology of development, puberty, adult life and death. It appears in x-shaped structures (chromosomes) in the nucleus of every cell, is made up of blocks of functional units called genes, and contains four foundational amino acids, abbreviated as G, C, A and T. The order of these acids determines the function of a sequence of DNA.
  • Tom Slick
    legend among the "independents"
    hands-on, impromptu deals were often brokered on street corners and over telephones.
    "worked out of his hip pocket."
    Quest for the Abominable Snowman, yeti and Sasquatch. Creation of a research facility near Loch Ness.
    Life made for the movies… Nicholas Cage?
    Tom Slick
    Tom Slick, born in 1916, was a San Antonio oil millionaire who used his fortune to further the causes of scientific research and peace throughout the world. He founded the Southwest Research Institute, the Southwest Foundation for Research and Education, the Institute of Inventive Research and the Mind Science Foundation. He was also a cryptozoologist and helped finance expeditions searching for the Yeti. There is a Tom Slick Professorship of World Peace at the University of Texas, which also publishes a Tom Slick World Peace Series of books. In 1958 he wrote the book Permanent Peace, which said in the dedication, "To that beautiful new world to emerge when the spectre of war has been banished forever - when the life blood now draining into armaments will, transfused into the bloodstream of the world, bring about unbelievable new progress, prosperity, health and happiness." He died in a airplane crash in 1962.
  • Tom Slick
    legend among the "independents"
    hands-on, impromptu deals were often brokered on street corners and over telephones.
    "worked out of his hip pocket."
    Quest for the Abominable Snowman, yeti and Sasquatch. Creation of a research facility near Loch Ness.
    Life made for the movies… Nicholas Cage?
    Tom Slick
    Tom Slick, born in 1916, was a San Antonio oil millionaire who used his fortune to further the causes of scientific research and peace throughout the world. He founded the Southwest Research Institute, the Southwest Foundation for Research and Education, the Institute of Inventive Research and the Mind Science Foundation. He was also a cryptozoologist and helped finance expeditions searching for the Yeti. There is a Tom Slick Professorship of World Peace at the University of Texas, which also publishes a Tom Slick World Peace Series of books. In 1958 he wrote the book Permanent Peace, which said in the dedication, "To that beautiful new world to emerge when the spectre of war has been banished forever - when the life blood now draining into armaments will, transfused into the bloodstream of the world, bring about unbelievable new progress, prosperity, health and happiness." He died in a airplane crash in 1962.
  • Four Spanish frontier missions, part of a colonization system that stretched across the Spanish Southwest in the 17th, 18th, 19th centuries, are preserved here.
  • supported 5 children by peddling stolen firewood and selling watered-down milk. His notorious business practices eventually earned his San Antonio neighborhood the nickname Beanville.
  • Feb 1910 arrival
    March 1910 First Flight
    in charge of the first airplane owned and used in the service of the U.S. Army
    He was the only pilot, navigator, instructor, observer and commander in the heavier-than-air division of the U.S. Army from November 1909 to April 1911.
    Mexican Punitive Expedition: Poncho Villa (March to August 1916)
    Taking part in Brig. Gen. John J. Pershing 1916 Mexican expedition was a learning experience for the U. S. Army's first air arm--mainly in respect to its own deficiencies.
    designed and used the first radio receiving set ever used in a military airplane
    Invented Wheels and Seat belt among other things
    first airplane reconnaissance flight
    He advocated a separate air force and became chief of the Army Air Corps
    Mexican Punitive Expedition (March to August 1916) with General John J. Pershing, the commander of the expedition.
    Foulois was slight of stature, combative, outspoken, often impetuous, and seldom diplomatic. Despite a stormy career centered on the fight for an independent air force, he was appointed Chief of the Air Corps in 1931. Along the way, especially as chief, Foulois' s crusading zeal and intemperance earned him the enmity of President Franklin Roosevelt, some powerful members of Congress, and most of the War Department General Staff. When he retired in December 1935, there was no ceremony, no medal for the pioneer who had done so much for military aviation.
    The Army bought the Wright aircraft; the agreement required the inventors to teach two officers to fly the machine. Benny was slated to be one of the trainees until he made disparaging remarks about the worth of dirigibles that were contrary to the official War Department view. The Army brass decided to put this outspoken little lieutenant in his place. A shocked Foulois received orders to proceed at once to an aeronautical meeting in France.
    This was a heady time for the thirty-year-old lieutenant. He began modifying the plane and experimenting with ways to use it to support ground forces. He substituted wheels for the original skids and installed the first airplane seat belt after nearly being thrown out of the machine while attempting to land in gusty winds. Foulois also demonstrated the airplane's practical use in military operations by doing aerial mapping, photography, and observation of troop movements. When trouble erupted along the Mexican border, he set a cross-country distance record of 1 06 miles on March 3,1911, while on a reconnaissance flight. The same year he designed the first air-to-ground wireless system and demonstrated its practicality. The Army, however, remained unimpressed with military aviation. Its fragile plane spent more time in the repair shop than in the air.
    Among the many firsts Foulois attained during his distinguished career are;
    1908 First flight as a dirigible pilot
    1909 First observer on an aircraft cross-country
    1910 First military man to teach himself to fly
    First and only military test pilot flying Old No. 1
    1911 First to fly more than 100 miles non-stop
    First on an operational reconnaissance flight
    First to test use of radio in flight
    1914 First commander of a tactical air unit (1st Aero Squadron)
    First commander of the first mechanized tactical unit in the U.S. Army (1st Aero Squadron)
    1916 First to use an aircraft in a combat operation (Mexico)
    1918 First chief of Air Service, AEF, 1st Army
    1931 First chief of Air Corps to be a military aviator
    1933 First Air Corps chief to be awarded Mackay Trophy
    1962 First Honorary Staff Member of Air Force Systems Command
    1964 First honorary member of the Aerospace Primus Club
  • http://www.cinetecamilano.it/2002/05_nov-dic/appuntamenti_melies.htm
    Gaston Melies' Star Film Company came to Hot Wells, in January, 1910, for a different kind of cure. Fleeing a bitter New York winter, they sought a warmer, more picturesque environment in which to take their moving pictures.
    Star Film Company
    1910 and April, 1911: the time when the Company was based at Hot Wells Hotel.
    produced nearly eighty one-reelers: fast-paced, raucous, sentimental, melodramatic Westerns and comedies. But there are no reminders of them, either, on this forgotten tract of land. No cameras, sets, costumes or scripts. No member of the company -- no actor, director or cameraman -- is still alive.
  • 1927
    Clara Bow
    "Buddy" Rogers
    Dick Grace
    Death Squad
    "Wings" stars the glamorous silent film actress Clara Bow (the "It" Girl) and Charles "Buddy" Rogers. Got your trivia hat on? "Wings" was the first Academy Award winner for best picture—that was back in 1927. The movie has some of the most innovative pretalkie special effects in movie making. About two World War I pilots in love with the same woman.
    Dick Grace "Squadron of Death!“ “crack-up engineer."
  • President J. Dan Bates, who took office in November 1997. Bates leads more than scientists, engineers, and support personnel in the conduct of almost 1,500 nationally and internationally sponsored projects each year.
    SwRI was founded in 1947 by Thomas Baker Slick Jr., an oilman-rancher-philanthropist who believed that science and technology are the keys to a better world.
    Southwest Research Institute (SwRI) is an independent, nonprofit applied research and development organization. The staff of specialize in the creation and transfer of technology in engineering and the physical sciences. The Institute occupies 1,200 acres in San Antonio, Texas, and provides nearly two million square feet of laboratories, test facilities, workshops, and offices. The staff performed more than $350 million in contract research in 2003.
    Founder Thomas Baker Slick Jr. - businessman, inventor, oilman, rancher, engineer, philanthropist, peacemaker, adventurer, and visionary.
  • 1950 Great White Way
    Kelly AFB
    http://proft.50megs.com/kelly.html#jet
    http://proft.50megs.com/kelly.html#jet
    THE JET AGE</font> </b>
    <p>As the Air Force moved through its first decade of independence, its
    aircraft, engines, accessories, and support equipment became increasingly
    sophisticated and complex, requiring use of new technologies and innovative
    programs to meet the challenges of the future.
    <p>By 1951, the <a href="javascript:imageWindow('B-36','b-36-kh.jpg',693,444)">Convair B-36</a> began arriving in ever-increasing numbers at Kelly.  With its powerful R4360 engines, the B-36 rapidly took the place
    of the B-29.  Nicknamed the "Peacekeeper," the B-36 was radical in its design;
    its six pusher engines gave it a top speed of over 400 miles per hour,
    and it was the first American bomber capable of reaching any target on
    the globe.
    <p>R4360 engines also powered the <a href="javascript:imageWindow('XC-99','xc-99-kh.jpg',619,180)">XC-99</a>.  Convair built this one-and-only transport in 1947 to use the technology of the B-36 more effectively.  As
    the large cargo plane to date, the XC-99 set many world records between
    1953 and 1955, before the Air Force decided it did not need large transport
    planes.  The longest flight - 12,000 miles to Rhein Main Air Base in Germany
    - began on August 13 1953.  Carrying the 61,000 pounds of vital cargo, it
    flew to Germany via Bermuda and the Azores and returned a week later carrying
    another 62,000 pounds.  Every place the <a href="http://www.40th-bomb-wing.com/gallery6.html" target="_blank">XC-99</a> landed, newspaper, radio,
    and television reporters were there to convey to the public the excitement
    of the spectacular flight.
    <p>Another record-breaking flight took place during May 1955.  The XC-99
    was put to the test in support of PROJECT DEWLINE.  In conjunction with
    the Military Transport Service, the XC-99 airlifted 380,000 pounds of cargo
    to Iceland from Delaware, a distance of 2,500 miles. The plane was airborne
    210 hours and 41 minutes.  Some trouble was experienced, but the 31 civilian
    technicians from the San Antonio depot successfully repaired the <a href="http://www.mysanantonio.com/news/metro/stories/MYSA112804.3B.xc99.9c384019.html" target="_blank">XC-99</a>
    at Dover AFB.
    <p>Jet engines had become extremely important to the Air Force by 1955.
    The <a href="javascript:imageWindow('B-47','b-47-kh.jpg',500,278)">Boeing B-47</a> Stratojet bomber was the first full weapons system bomber.  Designed in 1945, the B-47 was powered by six General Electric J47 turbojet
    engines and featured swept-back wings and tail surfaces.  Its mission was
    to deliver conventional or nuclear ordnance to enemy targets.  On November
    30, 1959, a B-47 bomber set a world endurance record, remaining airborne
    for three days, eight hours, and eight minutes, and covering a distance
    of 32,900 miles.  After relegating the bomber to reconnaissance and training
    missions, the latest Stratojets were taken out of the active United States
    Air Force inventory in 1966.
    <p>The <a href="javascript:imageWindow('B-58','b-58-kh.jpg',440,312)">B-58 "Hustler"</a> was yet another important addition to the Air Force inventory.  As America's first supersonic bomber, it could range higher
    and faster than any other bomber aircraft in the world, flying at twice
    the speed of sound.  Its four J79 engines produced over 41,000 pounds of
    thrust that could push the sleek bomber at more than 1,300 mph.  The first
    B-58 arrived at Kelly on March 15, 1960 to be used for training maintenance
    personnel for the new overhaul workload.  On May 26, 1958, SAAMA opened
    the B-58 Logistics Support Management Office.  It became the forerunner
    of a major area organizational realignment whereby worldwide weapons management
    functions would be separated organizationally from the internal depot operations.
    Responsibilities outlined for the weapon system manager included budgeting,
    funding, computing requirements, and arranging for maintenance.
    <p>Kelly repaired and overhauled <a href="javascript:imageWindow('B-52','b-52-kh.jpg',600,353)">B-52</a>s for over 30 years.  In the early 1960s, the B-52 was the major depot-level maintenance workload for SAAMA.
    Modifications to the B-52s performed at Kelly increased the load capability
    of each plane and increased the aircraft's range.  In addition, the San
    Antonio shops camouflage-painted the B-52s for Southeast Asia operations.
    This era in Kelly's history ended when the Air Force shifted the B-52 workload
    to Oklahoma City in the spring of 1993.  The 36-year old relationship between
    Kelly and the big bomber was the longest association between any Air Force
    weapons system and a single ALC to that point.
    <br> <a name="vietnam"></a>
    <br><b><font size=+1>VIETNAM </font></b>
    <p>Kelly's workload remained relatively stable until the mid-1960s, when
    American efforts to prevent the fall of the South Vietnamese government
    led to direct American involvement. Following the Gulf of Tonkin incident
    in August 1964, all air materiel areas began supporting Southeast Asia
    on a 24-hour basis.  For the next 11 years, Kelly employees were deeply
    involved in supplying parts and expertise for the conflict in Southeast
    Asia, working both within the United States and overseas.
    <p>In May 1965, during the build-up of American forces in Vietnam, the
    Logistics Command started sending teams of supply personnel to the Pacific
    Air Forces.  Kelly had a lot of volunteers.  By December 31, 1965, SAAMA
    had sent 11 supply teams, totaling 89 personnel, on temporary duty to Southeast
    Asia to establish supply centers throughout the western Pacific, including
    Vietnam.
    <p>Kelly also sent maintenance teams to Southeast Asia.  The first team
    consisted of six jet engine mechanics that worked in the Philippines on
    J57 engines for <a href="javascript:imageWindow('F-100','f-100-kh.jpg',500,359)">F-100</a>s.  Other Kelly workers served in Vietnam on special <a href="javascript:imageWindow('F-5','f-5-kh.jpg',671,262)">F-5</a> modification teams, helped reassemble newly shipped F-5 aircraft at Bien Hoa Air Base, and assisted in the creation of an engine repair facility
    at Bien Hoa.  Some workers served on rapid area maintenance supply support
    or area transportation teams while others served as weapon system logistic
    officers.  Those who remained in San Antonio also strove to meet the demands
    for materiel and aircraft maintenance.
    <p>On July 1, 1965, Kelly opened as an aerial port of embarkation to provide
    though-plane cargo service to Southeast Asia.  Kelly Air Force Base personnel
    processed and routed vital war material earmarked for Vietnam to the Southeast
    Asian Theater.  By 1967, the pace of the United States build-up intensified.
    The <a href="javascript:imageWindow('C-141','c-141-kh.jpg',600,332)">C-141 Starlifter</a> cargo aircraft began to enter the Air Force inventory in sufficient numbers to replace the aging <a href="javascript:imageWindow('C-124','c-124-kh.jpg',366,246)">C-124 Globemaster</a>.  With air
    terminal modernization and the increased use of C-141 aircraft, Military
    Airlift Command aircrews seldom experienced any delays at Kelly's aerial
    port.
    <p>On November 1, 1965, SAAMA assumed responsibility for the Air Force's
    entire watercraft program.  This included all landing-type vessels, spares,
    engines, and combat ships.  Other items included cargo tanks, special service
    vessels, barges, small craft, dredges, rigging, and marine hardware.  Earlier
    that year, on August 3, Kelly became responsible for assembly and shipment
    of the necessary airfield lighting equipment to establish four semi-fixed
    installations in Southeast Asia.  
    <p>In August 1996, the Air Force Logistics Command established PROJECT
    LOGGY SORT (LOGGY-Specialize Overseas Repair Test) to study the requirements
    for repair and maintenance of United States Air Force tactical aircraft
    in a combat environment in Southeast Asia.  The goal was to provide tactical
    fighter units with greater mobility and flexibility.  The <br><a href="javascript:imageWindow('F-4','f-4-kh.jpg',696,400)">F-4C</a> aircraft was selected as the test vehicle because it was the most modern system
    in existence and best represented planned future weapon systems.  SAAMA,
    as manager for the F-4s aerospace ground equipment, accumulated, analyzed
    and established base level repair restrictions on the items.
    <p>Weapon systems used in Southeast Asia managed by SAAMA included <a href="javascript:imageWindow('F-102','f-102-kh.jpg',458,262)">F-102</a>, <a href="javascript:imageWindow('F-106','f-106-kh.jpg',472,212)">F-106</a>, <a href="javascript:imageWindow('A-37','a-37-kh.jpg',734,244)">A-37</a>, <a href="javascript:imageWindow('O-2','o-2-kh.jpg',465,246)">O-2</a>, and F-5 aircraft, while the major maintenance workloads
    centered around aircraft engines, airfield lighting equipment, life support
    system items, aerospace ground equipment, and fuels.  Specific maintenance
    workloads were B-52 aircraft modifications such as the T34, T-56 and J79
    engine overhaul and recoverable-aerospace item repair.
    <p>The early 1970s witnessed the establishment of the Vietnamization Program,
    also known as the Nixon Doctrine.  This new policy was the key to planned
    reductions in the Untied States military forces in South Vietnam.  As part
    of this effort, SAAMA personnel were deeply involved in the planning and
    construction of an engine facility at Bien Hoa Air Base.  This assignment
    began in February 1971 when the Air Force Logistics Command gave the SAAMA
    the responsibility for developing complete plans and specifications for
    converting an existing building at Bien Hoa Air Base into an engine overhaul
    facility.
    <p>One month later, the San Antonio Air Materiel Area became involved with
    yet another project to provide logistics support.  On October 20,1972, SAAMA
    initiated PROJECT ENHANCE PLUS, to transfer A-37, F-5, and <a href="javascript:imageWindow('T-38','t-38cap.jpg',534,482)">T-38</a> aircraft, engines, and support spares to the Republic of Vietnam to carry on the
    war after American withdrawal.  Nearly every directorate at Kelly contributed
    to this effort.
    <p>The San Antonio Air Materiel Area set several records during this period.
    In addition to the transfer of A-37s, F-5s, and T-38s, over 18.3 million
    pounds of cargo were sent on 232 missions using C-141, <a href="javascript:imageWindow('C-5','c-5-kh.jpg',1096,396)">C-5</a>, <a href="javascript:imageWindow('Boeing_707','boeing-707-kh.jpg',600,480)">Boeing 707</a> and <a href="javascript:imageWindow('DC-8','dc-8-kh.jpg',450,300)">DC-8</a> aircraft.  United States Air Force Headquarters congratulated all concerned for their support in this project.  They said it was proud of the ability shown by all air logistics centers and other activities to get the job done in spite of the critical time, worldwide scope of the
    operation, and the many actions which had to be completed.
    <p>A year before the United States ended its involvement in Southeast Asian
    hostilities; the military services began to prepare for the return of North
    Vietnam-held Prisoners of War.  With the signing of the Paris Peace Accords
    on January 27, 1972, "Operation Homecoming" was on. The prisoners were
    flown from North Vietnam to the Joint Homecoming Reception Center at Clark
    Air Base, the Philippines.  Once at Clark, the POWs were given medical checkups,
    issued uniforms and personal items, and made those very important phone
    calls home.  After a minimum time at Clark, the POWs flew to the United
    States to be reunited with their families and to receive complete medical
    and psychological evaluation and treatment.  Lackland Air Force Base and
    Fort Sam Houston were designated as reception areas in San Antonio because
    each had hospital facilities to handle the needs of the returning prisoners
    of war.  Kelly became the reception area.  Flights bringing the former POWs
    to Kelly began on February 15 1973.  Although crowds were deliberately kept
    small, the occasion was full of joy.  The 11 flights that arrived at Kelly
    carried 20 Air Force and 12 Army men.  Kelly Air Force Base took great pride
    in welcoming home the brave men who had spent years in captivity.
    <p> <a name="changes"></a>
    <br> <font size=+1><b>CHANGES</b></font><p>
    In 1974, San Antonio Air Materiel Area changed its name to the San Antonio
    Air Logistics Center, but the dedication and support to the Air Force mission
    remained the same.
    <p>The <a href="javascript:imageWindow('C-5A','c-5a-kh.jpg',850,620)">C-5A Galaxy</a>, the world's largest aircraft, entered the Air Force inventory on October 8, 1965.  San Antonio Air Materiel Area had both management
    and repair responsibility for the giant transport and its <a href="javascript:imageWindow('TF-39_Engine','tf-39-kh.jpg',470,388)">TF39 engine</a>.  Weighing about 350 tons, the aircraft can transport 98 percent of equipment
    issued to an Army division, including the 100,000 pound M-1 tank, self-propelled
    artillery equipment, missiles, and helicopters.  On its initial visit to
    Kelly on January 31, 1970, prominent figures as well as public spectators
    greeted the C-5A.  Since then, the C-5A has undergone engine and aircraft
    repairs and modifications.  The largest modification program ever managed
    by an Air Logistics Center was the program to strengthen the wings on the
    C-5A.  The project was a result of a fatigue testing which indicated that
    the C-5A wing had an operational life of only 8,000 mission hours.  The
    goal, therefore, was to reach a 30,000-hour service-life by replacing the
    center, outer, and inner wing boxes.  On May 14, 1980, a prototype-modified
    aircraft was ready for flight test.  Two months later, a scientific advisory
    board met to review the results and recommended a continuation of the wing
    modification program.
    <p>As good as the C-5A was, Lockheed and the Air Force began plans to incorporate
    reliability and maintainability factors into the large cargo plane, producing
    the <a href="javascript:imageWindow('C-5B','c-5b-kh.jpg',792,524)">C-5B</a>.  The Galaxy "B" fleet added 7.5 million cargo tons per day to
    the United States military strategic airlift capability.
    <p>With the transfer of B-52 repair and overhaul to Oklahoma City in 1993,
    Kelly's workers shifted their attention to keeping the T-38 jet trainers
    of Air Education and Training Command ready to fly.  This workload moved
    to Kelly in the spring of 1993.
    <p>The F100 engine became a major engine workload for Kelly in the late
    1970s as <a href="javascript:imageWindow('F-16','f-16-kh.jpg',550,311)">F-16</a>s and <br><a href="javascript:imageWindow('F-15','f-15-kh.jpg',600,364)">F-15</a>s entered the Air Force inventory in increasing numbers.  Air Force officials predicted the F100 to be Kelly's largest overhaul workload since the Pratt and Whitney R4360 engine, which dominated overhaul
    activities at the base for more than a decade.  The San Antonio Air Materiel
    Area was designated as the Specialized Repair Activity for the F100 in
    1969.
    <p>The first <a href="javascript:imageWindow('F-100_Engine','f100.jpg',753,600)">F100 engine</a> arrived at the SA-ALC on August 9, 1974.  Primarily
    used as a trainer, this first engine was also used as a prototype repair
    engine to determine the adequacy of planning documents, technical data,
    tools and equipment.  Management and maintenance of the F100 is complicated
    by the unique design of the engine.  The engine is divided into five modules.
    Defective modules could be removed and replaced with spares to return the
    engine to service more rapidly.  Another unique aspect of the F100 engine
    is the "on-condition" maintenance feature.  This occurs if an inspection
    team determines that the rest of the modules are in good working order.
    Only the affected part would be overhauled and the rest of the engine would
    be left alone.  In addition, time between overhauls is measured in terms
    of cycles, or throttling up and down action, rather than flight hours.
    <p>The San Antonio Air Logistics Center also managed the new <a href="javascript:imageWindow('C-17','c-17-kh.jpg',576,431)">C-17</a>, developed by the Douglas Aircraft Company.  This advanced aircraft is a rugged, reliable,
    modern airlifter designed to meet requirements established jointly by the
    Army, Marines, and the Air Force.  The C-17 provides the United States combat
    commanders with the increased mobility to get to the battle sooner-and
    to win.  Kelly's involvement in the C-17 program was further strengthened
    when Air Force Logistics Command named it the source of repair for the
    airframe.  Logistics support responsibility for the aircraft was made virtually
    complete in March 1985 when AFLC gave SA-ALC management and repair responsibility
    for the C-17 engines, the F117.
    <p>Americans have always looked to the future, but the future of Kelly's
    involvement in space have been a "now" responsibility for more than 25
    years.  In August of 1962, SAAMA “loaned” the National Aeronautics and Space
    Administration (NASA) six aircraft - two F-102s, two TF102s and two <a href="javascript:imageWindow('T-33','t-33-kh.jpg',461,219)">T33</a>s - so the astronauts at the Houston Manned Spaceflight Center could maintain
    their flying proficiency.  Two years later, Directorate of Maintenance workers
    built three Apollo capsule trainers for NASA.  And Kelly's Directorate of
    Aerospace Fuels has supplied NASA with the required liquid propellants
    from the very beginning of the Space Administration's push into space.  
    <p>On November 16, 1973, the Directorate of Aerospace Fuels provided propellants
    support to the last of the Skylab space program launches.  In March 1979,
    the <a href="javascript:imageWindow('747+Shuttle','747-shuttle-kh.jpg',623,500)">space shuttle "Columbia" perched atop a Boeing 747</a> arrived at Kelly Air Force Base for the first time for a refueling stop on its way to Kennedy
    Space Center in Florida.  This was Kelly's most dramatic and visible participation
    in support of the space program.
    <p>Kelly is home to many other unique organizations.  On June 16, 1958,
    prime maintenance responsibility for all items within the Air Force's Nuclear
    Weapons Program were assigned to SAAMA.  The <a href="javascript:imageWindow('Bldg_1420','bldg1420.jpg',500,333)">Directorate of Special Weapons</a>
    remains the only logistical nuclear ordnance manager in the Air Force.
    It managed all United States Air Force nuclear weapon equipment such as
    missile re-entry systems, warheads, bomb arming and fusing devices, tools,
    and tests handling and training equipment.
  • Kelly AFB
    http://proft.50megs.com/kelly.html#jet
    http://proft.50megs.com/kelly.html#jet
    THE JET AGE</font> </b>
    <p>As the Air Force moved through its first decade of independence, its
    aircraft, engines, accessories, and support equipment became increasingly
    sophisticated and complex, requiring use of new technologies and innovative
    programs to meet the challenges of the future.
    <p>By 1951, the <a href="javascript:imageWindow('B-36','b-36-kh.jpg',693,444)">Convair B-36</a> began arriving in ever-increasing numbers at Kelly.  With its powerful R4360 engines, the B-36 rapidly took the place
    of the B-29.  Nicknamed the "Peacekeeper," the B-36 was radical in its design;
    its six pusher engines gave it a top speed of over 400 miles per hour,
    and it was the first American bomber capable of reaching any target on
    the globe.
    <p>R4360 engines also powered the <a href="javascript:imageWindow('XC-99','xc-99-kh.jpg',619,180)">XC-99</a>.  Convair built this one-and-only transport in 1947 to use the technology of the B-36 more effectively.  As
    the large cargo plane to date, the XC-99 set many world records between
    1953 and 1955, before the Air Force decided it did not need large transport
    planes.  The longest flight - 12,000 miles to Rhein Main Air Base in Germany
    - began on August 13 1953.  Carrying the 61,000 pounds of vital cargo, it
    flew to Germany via Bermuda and the Azores and returned a week later carrying
    another 62,000 pounds.  Every place the <a href="http://www.40th-bomb-wing.com/gallery6.html" target="_blank">XC-99</a> landed, newspaper, radio,
    and television reporters were there to convey to the public the excitement
    of the spectacular flight.
    <p>Another record-breaking flight took place during May 1955.  The XC-99
    was put to the test in support of PROJECT DEWLINE.  In conjunction with
    the Military Transport Service, the XC-99 airlifted 380,000 pounds of cargo
    to Iceland from Delaware, a distance of 2,500 miles. The plane was airborne
    210 hours and 41 minutes.  Some trouble was experienced, but the 31 civilian
    technicians from the San Antonio depot successfully repaired the <a href="http://www.mysanantonio.com/news/metro/stories/MYSA112804.3B.xc99.9c384019.html" target="_blank">XC-99</a>
    at Dover AFB.
    <p>Jet engines had become extremely important to the Air Force by 1955.
    The <a href="javascript:imageWindow('B-47','b-47-kh.jpg',500,278)">Boeing B-47</a> Stratojet bomber was the first full weapons system bomber.  Designed in 1945, the B-47 was powered by six General Electric J47 turbojet
    engines and featured swept-back wings and tail surfaces.  Its mission was
    to deliver conventional or nuclear ordnance to enemy targets.  On November
    30, 1959, a B-47 bomber set a world endurance record, remaining airborne
    for three days, eight hours, and eight minutes, and covering a distance
    of 32,900 miles.  After relegating the bomber to reconnaissance and training
    missions, the latest Stratojets were taken out of the active United States
    Air Force inventory in 1966.
    <p>The <a href="javascript:imageWindow('B-58','b-58-kh.jpg',440,312)">B-58 "Hustler"</a> was yet another important addition to the Air Force inventory.  As America's first supersonic bomber, it could range higher
    and faster than any other bomber aircraft in the world, flying at twice
    the speed of sound.  Its four J79 engines produced over 41,000 pounds of
    thrust that could push the sleek bomber at more than 1,300 mph.  The first
    B-58 arrived at Kelly on March 15, 1960 to be used for training maintenance
    personnel for the new overhaul workload.  On May 26, 1958, SAAMA opened
    the B-58 Logistics Support Management Office.  It became the forerunner
    of a major area organizational realignment whereby worldwide weapons management
    functions would be separated organizationally from the internal depot operations.
    Responsibilities outlined for the weapon system manager included budgeting,
    funding, computing requirements, and arranging for maintenance.
    <p>Kelly repaired and overhauled <a href="javascript:imageWindow('B-52','b-52-kh.jpg',600,353)">B-52</a>s for over 30 years.  In the early 1960s, the B-52 was the major depot-level maintenance workload for SAAMA.
    Modifications to the B-52s performed at Kelly increased the load capability
    of each plane and increased the aircraft's range.  In addition, the San
    Antonio shops camouflage-painted the B-52s for Southeast Asia operations.
    This era in Kelly's history ended when the Air Force shifted the B-52 workload
    to Oklahoma City in the spring of 1993.  The 36-year old relationship between
    Kelly and the big bomber was the longest association between any Air Force
    weapons system and a single ALC to that point.
    <br> <a name="vietnam"></a>
    <br><b><font size=+1>VIETNAM </font></b>
    <p>Kelly's workload remained relatively stable until the mid-1960s, when
    American efforts to prevent the fall of the South Vietnamese government
    led to direct American involvement. Following the Gulf of Tonkin incident
    in August 1964, all air materiel areas began supporting Southeast Asia
    on a 24-hour basis.  For the next 11 years, Kelly employees were deeply
    involved in supplying parts and expertise for the conflict in Southeast
    Asia, working both within the United States and overseas.
    <p>In May 1965, during the build-up of American forces in Vietnam, the
    Logistics Command started sending teams of supply personnel to the Pacific
    Air Forces.  Kelly had a lot of volunteers.  By December 31, 1965, SAAMA
    had sent 11 supply teams, totaling 89 personnel, on temporary duty to Southeast
    Asia to establish supply centers throughout the western Pacific, including
    Vietnam.
    <p>Kelly also sent maintenance teams to Southeast Asia.  The first team
    consisted of six jet engine mechanics that worked in the Philippines on
    J57 engines for <a href="javascript:imageWindow('F-100','f-100-kh.jpg',500,359)">F-100</a>s.  Other Kelly workers served in Vietnam on special <a href="javascript:imageWindow('F-5','f-5-kh.jpg',671,262)">F-5</a> modification teams, helped reassemble newly shipped F-5 aircraft at Bien Hoa Air Base, and assisted in the creation of an engine repair facility
    at Bien Hoa.  Some workers served on rapid area maintenance supply support
    or area transportation teams while others served as weapon system logistic
    officers.  Those who remained in San Antonio also strove to meet the demands
    for materiel and aircraft maintenance.
    <p>On July 1, 1965, Kelly opened as an aerial port of embarkation to provide
    though-plane cargo service to Southeast Asia.  Kelly Air Force Base personnel
    processed and routed vital war material earmarked for Vietnam to the Southeast
    Asian Theater.  By 1967, the pace of the United States build-up intensified.
    The <a href="javascript:imageWindow('C-141','c-141-kh.jpg',600,332)">C-141 Starlifter</a> cargo aircraft began to enter the Air Force inventory in sufficient numbers to replace the aging <a href="javascript:imageWindow('C-124','c-124-kh.jpg',366,246)">C-124 Globemaster</a>.  With air
    terminal modernization and the increased use of C-141 aircraft, Military
    Airlift Command aircrews seldom experienced any delays at Kelly's aerial
    port.
    <p>On November 1, 1965, SAAMA assumed responsibility for the Air Force's
    entire watercraft program.  This included all landing-type vessels, spares,
    engines, and combat ships.  Other items included cargo tanks, special service
    vessels, barges, small craft, dredges, rigging, and marine hardware.  Earlier
    that year, on August 3, Kelly became responsible for assembly and shipment
    of the necessary airfield lighting equipment to establish four semi-fixed
    installations in Southeast Asia.  
    <p>In August 1996, the Air Force Logistics Command established PROJECT
    LOGGY SORT (LOGGY-Specialize Overseas Repair Test) to study the requirements
    for repair and maintenance of United States Air Force tactical aircraft
    in a combat environment in Southeast Asia.  The goal was to provide tactical
    fighter units with greater mobility and flexibility.  The <br><a href="javascript:imageWindow('F-4','f-4-kh.jpg',696,400)">F-4C</a> aircraft was selected as the test vehicle because it was the most modern system
    in existence and best represented planned future weapon systems.  SAAMA,
    as manager for the F-4s aerospace ground equipment, accumulated, analyzed
    and established base level repair restrictions on the items.
    <p>Weapon systems used in Southeast Asia managed by SAAMA included <a href="javascript:imageWindow('F-102','f-102-kh.jpg',458,262)">F-102</a>, <a href="javascript:imageWindow('F-106','f-106-kh.jpg',472,212)">F-106</a>, <a href="javascript:imageWindow('A-37','a-37-kh.jpg',734,244)">A-37</a>, <a href="javascript:imageWindow('O-2','o-2-kh.jpg',465,246)">O-2</a>, and F-5 aircraft, while the major maintenance workloads
    centered around aircraft engines, airfield lighting equipment, life support
    system items, aerospace ground equipment, and fuels.  Specific maintenance
    workloads were B-52 aircraft modifications such as the T34, T-56 and J79
    engine overhaul and recoverable-aerospace item repair.
    <p>The early 1970s witnessed the establishment of the Vietnamization Program,
    also known as the Nixon Doctrine.  This new policy was the key to planned
    reductions in the Untied States military forces in South Vietnam.  As part
    of this effort, SAAMA personnel were deeply involved in the planning and
    construction of an engine facility at Bien Hoa Air Base.  This assignment
    began in February 1971 when the Air Force Logistics Command gave the SAAMA
    the responsibility for developing complete plans and specifications for
    converting an existing building at Bien Hoa Air Base into an engine overhaul
    facility.
    <p>One month later, the San Antonio Air Materiel Area became involved with
    yet another project to provide logistics support.  On October 20,1972, SAAMA
    initiated PROJECT ENHANCE PLUS, to transfer A-37, F-5, and <a href="javascript:imageWindow('T-38','t-38cap.jpg',534,482)">T-38</a> aircraft, engines, and support spares to the Republic of Vietnam to carry on the
    war after American withdrawal.  Nearly every directorate at Kelly contributed
    to this effort.
    <p>The San Antonio Air Materiel Area set several records during this period.
    In addition to the transfer of A-37s, F-5s, and T-38s, over 18.3 million
    pounds of cargo were sent on 232 missions using C-141, <a href="javascript:imageWindow('C-5','c-5-kh.jpg',1096,396)">C-5</a>, <a href="javascript:imageWindow('Boeing_707','boeing-707-kh.jpg',600,480)">Boeing 707</a> and <a href="javascript:imageWindow('DC-8','dc-8-kh.jpg',450,300)">DC-8</a> aircraft.  United States Air Force Headquarters congratulated all concerned for their support in this project.  They said it was proud of the ability shown by all air logistics centers and other activities to get the job done in spite of the critical time, worldwide scope of the
    operation, and the many actions which had to be completed.
    <p>A year before the United States ended its involvement in Southeast Asian
    hostilities; the military services began to prepare for the return of North
    Vietnam-held Prisoners of War.  With the signing of the Paris Peace Accords
    on January 27, 1972, "Operation Homecoming" was on. The prisoners were
    flown from North Vietnam to the Joint Homecoming Reception Center at Clark
    Air Base, the Philippines.  Once at Clark, the POWs were given medical checkups,
    issued uniforms and personal items, and made those very important phone
    calls home.  After a minimum time at Clark, the POWs flew to the United
    States to be reunited with their families and to receive complete medical
    and psychological evaluation and treatment.  Lackland Air Force Base and
    Fort Sam Houston were designated as reception areas in San Antonio because
    each had hospital facilities to handle the needs of the returning prisoners
    of war.  Kelly became the reception area.  Flights bringing the former POWs
    to Kelly began on February 15 1973.  Although crowds were deliberately kept
    small, the occasion was full of joy.  The 11 flights that arrived at Kelly
    carried 20 Air Force and 12 Army men.  Kelly Air Force Base took great pride
    in welcoming home the brave men who had spent years in captivity.
    <p> <a name="changes"></a>
    <br> <font size=+1><b>CHANGES</b></font><p>
    In 1974, San Antonio Air Materiel Area changed its name to the San Antonio
    Air Logistics Center, but the dedication and support to the Air Force mission
    remained the same.
    <p>The <a href="javascript:imageWindow('C-5A','c-5a-kh.jpg',850,620)">C-5A Galaxy</a>, the world's largest aircraft, entered the Air Force inventory on October 8, 1965.  San Antonio Air Materiel Area had both management
    and repair responsibility for the giant transport and its <a href="javascript:imageWindow('TF-39_Engine','tf-39-kh.jpg',470,388)">TF39 engine</a>.  Weighing about 350 tons, the aircraft can transport 98 percent of equipment
    issued to an Army division, including the 100,000 pound M-1 tank, self-propelled
    artillery equipment, missiles, and helicopters.  On its initial visit to
    Kelly on January 31, 1970, prominent figures as well as public spectators
    greeted the C-5A.  Since then, the C-5A has undergone engine and aircraft
    repairs and modifications.  The largest modification program ever managed
    by an Air Logistics Center was the program to strengthen the wings on the
    C-5A.  The project was a result of a fatigue testing which indicated that
    the C-5A wing had an operational life of only 8,000 mission hours.  The
    goal, therefore, was to reach a 30,000-hour service-life by replacing the
    center, outer, and inner wing boxes.  On May 14, 1980, a prototype-modified
    aircraft was ready for flight test.  Two months later, a scientific advisory
    board met to review the results and recommended a continuation of the wing
    modification program.
    <p>As good as the C-5A was, Lockheed and the Air Force began plans to incorporate
    reliability and maintainability factors into the large cargo plane, producing
    the <a href="javascript:imageWindow('C-5B','c-5b-kh.jpg',792,524)">C-5B</a>.  The Galaxy "B" fleet added 7.5 million cargo tons per day to
    the United States military strategic airlift capability.
    <p>With the transfer of B-52 repair and overhaul to Oklahoma City in 1993,
    Kelly's workers shifted their attention to keeping the T-38 jet trainers
    of Air Education and Training Command ready to fly.  This workload moved
    to Kelly in the spring of 1993.
    <p>The F100 engine became a major engine workload for Kelly in the late
    1970s as <a href="javascript:imageWindow('F-16','f-16-kh.jpg',550,311)">F-16</a>s and <br><a href="javascript:imageWindow('F-15','f-15-kh.jpg',600,364)">F-15</a>s entered the Air Force inventory in increasing numbers.  Air Force officials predicted the F100 to be Kelly's largest overhaul workload since the Pratt and Whitney R4360 engine, which dominated overhaul
    activities at the base for more than a decade.  The San Antonio Air Materiel
    Area was designated as the Specialized Repair Activity for the F100 in
    1969.
    <p>The first <a href="javascript:imageWindow('F-100_Engine','f100.jpg',753,600)">F100 engine</a> arrived at the SA-ALC on August 9, 1974.  Primarily
    used as a trainer, this first engine was also used as a prototype repair
    engine to determine the adequacy of planning documents, technical data,
    tools and equipment.  Management and maintenance of the F100 is complicated
    by the unique design of the engine.  The engine is divided into five modules.
    Defective modules could be removed and replaced with spares to return the
    engine to service more rapidly.  Another unique aspect of the F100 engine
    is the "on-condition" maintenance feature.  This occurs if an inspection
    team determines that the rest of the modules are in good working order.
    Only the affected part would be overhauled and the rest of the engine would
    be left alone.  In addition, time between overhauls is measured in terms
    of cycles, or throttling up and down action, rather than flight hours.
    <p>The San Antonio Air Logistics Center also managed the new <a href="javascript:imageWindow('C-17','c-17-kh.jpg',576,431)">C-17</a>, developed by the Douglas Aircraft Company.  This advanced aircraft is a rugged, reliable,
    modern airlifter designed to meet requirements established jointly by the
    Army, Marines, and the Air Force.  The C-17 provides the United States combat
    commanders with the increased mobility to get to the battle sooner-and
    to win.  Kelly's involvement in the C-17 program was further strengthened
    when Air Force Logistics Command named it the source of repair for the
    airframe.  Logistics support responsibility for the aircraft was made virtually
    complete in March 1985 when AFLC gave SA-ALC management and repair responsibility
    for the C-17 engines, the F117.
    <p>Americans have always looked to the future, but the future of Kelly's
    involvement in space have been a "now" responsibility for more than 25
    years.  In August of 1962, SAAMA “loaned” the National Aeronautics and Space
    Administration (NASA) six aircraft - two F-102s, two TF102s and two <a href="javascript:imageWindow('T-33','t-33-kh.jpg',461,219)">T33</a>s - so the astronauts at the Houston Manned Spaceflight Center could maintain
    their flying proficiency.  Two years later, Directorate of Maintenance workers
    built three Apollo capsule trainers for NASA.  And Kelly's Directorate of
    Aerospace Fuels has supplied NASA with the required liquid propellants
    from the very beginning of the Space Administration's push into space.  
    <p>On November 16, 1973, the Directorate of Aerospace Fuels provided propellants
    support to the last of the Skylab space program launches.  In March 1979,
    the <a href="javascript:imageWindow('747+Shuttle','747-shuttle-kh.jpg',623,500)">space shuttle "Columbia" perched atop a Boeing 747</a> arrived at Kelly Air Force Base for the first time for a refueling stop on its way to Kennedy
    Space Center in Florida.  This was Kelly's most dramatic and visible participation
    in support of the space program.
    <p>Kelly is home to many other unique organizations.  On June 16, 1958,
    prime maintenance responsibility for all items within the Air Force's Nuclear
    Weapons Program were assigned to SAAMA.  The <a href="javascript:imageWindow('Bldg_1420','bldg1420.jpg',500,333)">Directorate of Special Weapons</a>
    remains the only logistical nuclear ordnance manager in the Air Force.
    It managed all United States Air Force nuclear weapon equipment such as
    missile re-entry systems, warheads, bomb arming and fusing devices, tools,
    and tests handling and training equipment.
  • Dear Mr.Brazell:Thank you for your e-mail. I joined the Southwest Foundation for biomedical Research in October 1958. I am still active in my research at this wonderful research institution. As you may have noted fromSATAI records my research work is in the area of steroid hormones. My contributions are in the immunodignostic area of steroid hormones and the role of steroid hormones in cancer chemotherapy.Hope this information is helpful.Sincerely,P.N.Rao, Ph.D
    http://www.sfbr.org/pages/organic_cv.php?u=22
    v
    in 2003, SFBR scientists published their success in transplanting human cancer cells and tumors in the Monodelphis, marking the first time that human cancers have been able to grow and metastasize in another animal with an active immune system.
  • http://www.honoraryunsubscribe.com/william_a._mallow.html
    1973 – First Patent at SwRI Foam product from sodium silicate
    38 Patents
    Joined permanetly in 1961
    A polymer chemist at the Southwest Research Institute, Mallow enjoyed working on practical problems. He showed M&M-Mars how to keep peanut butter from gunking up the molds at M&M candy factories. He helped Bette Nesmith Graham (mother of "The Monkees" guitarist Michael Nesmith) perfect the formula for her invention, "Liquid Paper". He consulted on projects from Space Shuttle protective tiles to fake dinosaur skin -- and invented clumping cat litter. Mallow retired from SwRI in 1998, but continued to dabble in materials: most recently, he worked on the "Mobility Denial System" -- a slippery spray that could be used to disable enemy troops without injury or death. He died July 30 in San Antonio from leukemia. He was 72.
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  • “This Nation has tossed its cap over the wall of space, and we have no choice but to follow it.”
    --John F. Kennedy,
    Nov 21, 1963
    Shortly after its creation in 1958, NASA was greatly in need of medical expertise relating to the effects of the space environment on man. With the School of Aviation Medicine (SAM) [later School of Aerospace Medicine (SAM)] moving to Brooks Air Force Base (AFB) in 1959, NASA hired SAM to perform research and experiments relating to medical issues for manned spaceflight. At this time, the Department of Space Medicine at SAM was focused on a set of ambitious research goals relating to the protection of astronauts from the harsh space environment. Initially on a contract basis, SAM performed three projects for NASA.
  • Lieutenant Colonel Edward White
    During the third revolution, he carried out the first extra vehicular activity in the United States manned space flight program. He was outside Gemini 4 for 21 minutes, and became the first man to control himself in space during EVA with a maneuvering unit.
    he was named as one of the pilots of the AS-204 mission, the first 3-man Apollo flight.
    Lieutenant Colonel White died on January 26, 1967, in the Apollo spacecraft flash fire during a launch pad test at Kennedy Space Center, Florida.
  • http://www.excimernet.com/MPRKbody.htm
    The discoverer of a vision-enhancing
    technique used in LASIK surgery
    Among his more important contributions
    was his discovery of photo refractive
    kertectomy (PRK), a technique
    that uses laser energy to resurface the
    eyeís cornea to produce improved vision.
    U.S. Air Force School of Aerospace
    Medicine's Radiation Sciences Division.
    During his career-long tour here
    Taboada pioneered the development of
    special devices, made several important
    scientific discoveries and advanced
    scientific understanding of
    concepts with futuristic applications.
    Among his more important contributions
    was his discovery of photo refractive
    kertectomy (PRK), a technique
    that uses laser energy to resurface the
    eye's cornea to produce improved vision.
    Taboada later developed a one-of-akind
    instrument (patent pending) to
    measure the haze or loss of transparency
    that develops in the cornea after
    a PRK procedure.
    Among Air Force research discoveries
    Taboada made that will be the
    focus of his entrepreneurial investigations
    is the fascinating future possibility
    of creating "bionic" human vision.
  • The Palmaz Stent®
    The stent has dropped the occurrence of death due to heart disease from nearly 500 per every 100,000 Americans in 1970 to less than 200 per every 100,000 today. IP Worldwide magazine recently named the Palmaz Stent® among the 10 patents that have changed the world. Each year, at least 2 million stents are placed in patients worldwide.
    Dr. Palmaz is a professor of radiology at the Health Science Center.one of the world's most successful medical devices
    http://www.uthscsa.edu/mission/article.asp?id=73
    Magazine ranks Palmaz stent among '10 Patents that Changed World'
    by Amanda Gallagher
    The revolutionary Palmaz® stent, invented by Julio Palmaz, M.D., is listed as one of the '10 Patents That Changed the World' in the August issue of IP Worldwide magazine. Stents are now used in 2 million patients annually to repair clogged arteries near the heart and elsewhere in the body.Dr. Palmaz gained a U.S. patent on the stent in April 1988. The U.S. Food and Drug Administration granted approval for use in cardiac arteries in 1994.
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    2001, Both Emmy® VFX category winners, Star Trek: Voyager and Frank Herbert's Dune.
    2002, Series VFX Emmy winner Enterprise: Broken Bow, and then both categories again in 2003, for the series Firefly and the movie Children of Dune; and in 2004 Enterprise: Countdown and Peter Jennings Reporting: The Kennedy Assassination-Beyond Conspiracy. 
    Tim Jenison, founder and chief technology officer of NewTek, is considered the visionary force behind the desktop video revolution. Jenison founded NewTek in 1985, and led in the development of a series of highly successful products including DigiView, the first video digitizer for a computer; DigiPaint; the Amiga Video Toaster, which provided broadcast-quality video editing and special effects in one complete solution for under $5,000; the Amiga Video Toaster Flyer, which provided quality nonlinear video editing capabilities, affordably; LightWave 3D®; Calibar; and more recently Inspire 3D, Aura, and the new VT[3]. Before founding NewTek, Jenison attended Iowa State University, then pursued a career in the music industry. He began tinkering with and inventing things when he was just a child - an aptitude he put to good use at NewTek.
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  • LATIN RENISSANCE – George Cisneros
  • McDermott's Contributions to San Antonio
    http://www.anbhf.org/laureates/mcdermott.html
    In a tribute to Robert McDermott recently, Mayor Henry Cisneros of San Antonio stated that "when the economic history of San Antonio in the 1980s is written, the most influential individual will be him (McDermott)" [4]. After his arrival in San Antonio, McDermott was selected as President of the Greater San Antonio Chamber of Commerce. In this position he initiated the San Antonio Economic Development Council which began a drive to bring business development into San Antonio. When the Hispanic population felt they were not being included, McDermott founded United San Antonio which pulled all the disparate community groups together. In the 1980s he was responsible for getting an undergraduate engineering program at the University of Texas at San Antonio first and later graduate programs in the sciences. With this groundwork laid, he began moving in a formal sense to make San Antonio a biotechnology center for the future. He founded the Texas Research and Technology Foundation, which was established to develop a Texas Research Park. He also helped arrange for the first major gift of $15,000,000 for the park from H. Ross Perot. Today he is regarded as the key influential business leader in San Antonio. In addition to his personal contributions, McDermott believes that USAA should be a corporate good citizen, and it has been so. USAA's Volunteer Corps gave over 30m000 volunteer hours to San Antonio just last year and USA is the city's largest private-sector United Way contributor. Although USAA employees constitute only 2% of San Antonio's work force, they contributed 10% of the total monies collected by United Way.
    Brigadier General Robert F. McDermott and USAA - Service Plus Ethics Equals Success Dreamers and doers rarely come in the same package. The historical record is replete with figures who seem to have extraordinary vision, but who are unable to make their dreams come into reality. On the other hand, there are many who have been able to execute the ideas of others, but who do not seem to be able to think in broad terms bout the future. Recent historical scholarship placed John F. Kennedy in the first category and Lyndon Baines Johnson in the second. Robert F. McDermott, Chairman and CEO of USAA is one of the rare individuals who have brilliant conceptual ideas an who have been able to put them into operation. The First Career Prior to becoming CEO of USAA, McDermott had already demonstrated these traits while serving on active duty in the Air Force as the first permanent Dean of the newly founded USAF Academy. Upon assuming his position, the new Dean wished to make the Academy a premier undergraduate academic institution, as well as developer of professional military officers and leaders. He wished to attract first-rate applicants chosen without regard to political connections and to challenge them to meet their potential. He introduced sweeping innovations by overcoming opposition from the military establishment, particularly at West Point and Annapolis, political insiders in Washington, and those who wanted no change at all. The changes included introducing over 25 academic majors, setting up cooperative Master's degree programs with outstanding institutions, building a first class library, faculty and staff, and introducing the "whole man" admission program with little regard to political connections. All this resulted in McDermott getting the Air Force Academy accredited by the North Central Association prior to its first class graduating. This was an unheard of accomplishment. When he retired in 1968, the other military academies were already changing curriculum and procedures to match the newest of the academies. At a ceremony at West Point in 1989, the Superintendent of the US Air Force Academy, Lt. General Charles Hamm, referred to McDermott as the Sylvanus Thayer of the twentieth century, crediting McDermott with bringing all US service academies "into the twentieth century" [6]. USAA - The McDermott Infrastructure With his outstanding reputation as an insurance scholar developed through his teaching and two published books, his solid academic preparation including an MBA from Harvard, and his national reputation as a visionary, organizer, leader and manager, he came to USAA as an Executive Vice President in July of 1968. Over the next six months he would observe all facets of USAA's operation and begin formulating his visions for the future of USAA. When he assumed the role of President and CEO of USAA on January 1, 1969, the company was in good shape overall. Serving the auto property and casualty insurance needs of active duty officers since 1922, it had a solid reputation and had penetrated 70% of its potential market. It also provided homeowners insurance in some states and had just begun offering a basic life insurance policy. The members (USAA is actually a reciprocal insurance exchange - a member-owned cooperative if you will) were basically happy and contented with their company. On the face of it, it would not seem that a new man could do a great deal better than was already being done, but McDermott had observed much during his six-month orientation. While the small company was doing well and had assets of $200,000,000, it was doing well with increasing difficulty. Although basically solid financially, the Board had accorded the departing President "special recognition" by raising the annual dividend to all the members to a new high. This put the previous president in a rosy glow, but placed USAA in a hazardous cash position. One of McDermott's first acts was to cancel the "extra" dividend which created immediate unrest among the members, but which was necessary if the company were to get through a temporary financial crisis. It did. In the operating levels of USAA, McDermott noted many problems. The approximately 3,000 employees (over 90% women) did not like the work at all, and the annual turnover rate of 43% made this clear. To initiate a new automobile insurance [policy required 55 different steps at 55 different desks. Some of these simple steps were mind deadening, like pulling staples or unsealing envelops. The operation required moving files up and down seven different floors, and claims and underwriting maintained separate records on each member. At each desk were shelves and bins piled high with records requiring some action or awaiting filing. So confusing was the operation and so many records misplaced that a crew of dozens of college students searched for missing records every night in order to return them to where they were needed. Most employees felt that USAA was a good place to start, but few wanted to remain there and a career was unthinkable. The employees had little education and less loyalty to USAA. It was clear to McDermott that if USAA were to be a truly great company, sweeping changes would have to occur. Gathering with him a small number of those he brought on board and a few incumbents, he held a serious long-range planning meeting at the American Management Association's Conference Center in Hamilton, New York to set the future course for USAA. At this meeting and, to a lesser extent, those of the next two years, he began to reveal his goals for the future. On the operational side he challenged USAA to become a "paperless" insurance company, which seemed unreachable at the time. He committed USAA fully to use the newest technology to improve the operation and to make employees' jobs more meaningful. As a result, he was certain productivity would rise. He challenged the company to work through a myriad of state regulations and laws to enable USAA to provide automobile and property insurance to all members in all states. As far as employees were concerned, McDermott wanted sweeping changes to orient employees to provide better and more ethical service to the members. He proposed to accomplish this by developing a "corporate culture" that would provide an ethical, and service-oriented foundation that would permeate the entire company. He instituted the USAA Creed which charged members and employees to serve "each other with integrity and dependability" [25]. The goal in handling auto claims would be not to pay as little as possible and still satisfy the member, but to exercise "the highest standards of ethical and professional conduct while transacting claims business" [24]. Providing timely and responsive service with integrity and ethical conduct would build member faith and strengthen USAA for future growth. Training on ethical conduct became a staple in new employee orientation and all training courses. He even sought a new logo to give the company a more solid and a more modern look. McDermott recognized that a corporate culture in itself would not work without building pride among the employees. He challenged USAA to build new employment incentives including pay and other benefits. He pushed the Board of Directors in the direction of building a new facility to house all of USAA to increase efficiency and to give the employees more pride. Perhaps most important of all, he insisted programs be developed to encourage each employee to grow to his or her maximum potential. During McDermott's first few years, dozens of changes swept over USAA and its employees. The pattern for the larger changes was similar - first the vision, followed by long and short-range plans to accomplish the task. Then specialists, often outside consultants, would help in the development of operational ideas and selection of equipment. At the same time, intelligent, hard-working individuals were placed in charge of the projects and were given latitude to build teams and develop the operation programs. At almost the same juncture, plans were made to train affected employees and to prepare them physically and psychologically for the changes. These efforts tended to bring in innovations more quickly than expected with strong acceptance by the employees themselves. The results were more efficiency, productivity, and pride in a job done better than before. A typical example was the introduction of a computer system designed to produce multi-car policies. Today, all companies issue policies that list all the cars owned by a family. In 1969, each car had its own policy. The administrative work required to produce these policies was labor-intensive and expensive. With the introduction of a multi-car computer software system, all vehicles were listed on one policy. Just this change enabled USAA to increase its productivity enormously, deleting hundreds of manpower spaces in one year. A second benefit of this new system was to spread the auto renewal periods throughout the year. This enabled USAA to level out the workload and make more efficient use of available manpower. Over time, the development of USAA's gigantic information systems continually increased productivity and enabled it to provide better service to the members. At the present time, USAA has the largest IBM facility in the United States in terms of the numbers of transactions completed daily. The statistical growth is shown in Appendix 1, but does not really show what it means to the company today. Whereas issuing a policy in 1969 took 55 steps and an inordinate amount of time, today one Policy Service employee handles the entire transaction using his or her computer screen and the policy is on its way to the member in three days or less. This effort was highlighted recently in the February 13, 1989 issue of Fortune magazine [1]. Today, McDermott's earliest visions of leading-edge technology continue to unfold. Still working toward a "paperless" environment, USAA had been working on the development of imaging techniques. After a short experiment with 3M in 1984, McDermott convinced John Akers, CEO of IBM, to work with USAA in development and execution of the image-processing system. Working as partners, USA and IBM computer specialists and engineers were successful. In late 1988, John Akers came to USAA to cut the ribbon and see the new system in operation. Very simply, a document, such as a police report is given the USAA number and entered into the computer system by a process resembling a data fax to the casual observer. Only in this case the document is stored on an optical disk and is ready for recall at any of USAA's image computer screens in a split second. By the spring of 1989 USAA had all policy service documents on optical disks rendering the millions of pieces of paper expendable. After everything is entered on the optical disks, lost documents and misplaced files will become folklore instead of reality. McDermott's effort in improving his work force and pushing USAA into leading edge technology have combined into what Ed Yourdon called in the February 1989 issue of American Programmer one of the extremely rare "Exemplary Data Processing Organizations" in the country [26]. He pointed out how much "influence an exemplary CEO can have in the creation and motivation of an exemplary data processing organization." Improving the Work Force One of McDermott's earliest visions had been to improve working conditions by developing a new facility able to house all USAA employees under one roof. In 1969 he personally looked over properties. He rejected sites convenient to the city center where most employees lived and selected a site in the undeveloped northwest part of the city. He talked the Board of Directors into authorizing the purchase of 286 acres. He wanted good access for the employees and to build a campus-like setting. He wanted room for growth and did not want others encroaching upon USAA itself or its view. Today, the USAA property sits in the center of the fastest-growing area of the city and the value of the property has escalated like the population of San Antonio. As far as the building itself was concerned, McDermott wanted it to be a place where the employees would be proud and happy to work. He wanted the principal aesthetic costs concentrated on the interior and not the exterior. When completed in 1975, it turned out to be a state-of-the-art building for 1989 and was, and still is, the second largest horizontal office building in the country. All the flooring is "computer flooring" enabling the thousands of miles of computer and telephone wiring to be out of sight and to make internal moves easy and economical. The building has a center spine and on the main floor, three different courtyards where the employees can relax body and mind. Each courtyard has a different theme providing additional aesthetic beauty. The work areas themselves have cubicles including telephones and a computer terminal and are located adjacent to the courtyards for breaks. The building also contains other amenities to increase the comfort of the employees. Included is a company store to purchase sundry items, a ticket counter to purchase discounted tickets to San Antonio attractions, a contract post office, a health clinic, exercise gymnasium and outstanding cafeterias. Getting good employees to come to USAA was only one step. Retention of good employees was the next. To assist in both these tasks, McDermott introduced programs to improve the physical well being and health of the employees and to help them develop to achieve their individual potential as well. Building and maintaining the physical well being of the USAA employees has been a multi-faceted program. In 1972, McDermott convinced the USAA Board of Directors to incorporate a physical fitness center into the new building. The resultant 9,700 square foot center houses lockers, saunas, steam rooms, cardiovascular treadmills and exercise bicycles, a Nordic skier and rowing machines. Two professional exercise physiologists monitor the individual exercise programs. Almost 2,000 employees participate in the center's programs. Outside the building are 35 acres devoted to fitness activity areas which include five miles of jogging trails winding through the trees, a multi-purpose soccer field, softball fields, basketball and volleyball courts, and tennis courts. All are equipped with lights for evening use. This year almost 3,000 employees participated in various intramural sports leagues. The fitness and athletic program is balanced by a first-class health service staff and program. Its eight registered nurses provide a complete health-oriented program for employees. Among the programs conducted are brown-bag health seminars, free allergy and flue immunizations, on-site mammograms, free diabetes, hypertension and cholesterol testing and an annual Health Fair. The Health Services staff also provides smoking cessation training which was of significant help when McDermott phased in a "no smoking" policy in all USAA buildings. At the present time, smoking is authorized in only a few lounges and a small section of the cafeterias, with the goal to eliminate all smoking by the end of 1990. Free comprehensive physical examinations are provided to employees over 50 years of age. Confidential employee counseling is also provided. In 1980 alone, the counselors served over 3,000 employees. Part of the counseling service also includes information on area childcare facilities. Other wellness incentives include low-priced "Treat Yourself Right" menus in the cafeteria which encourage good eating habits and a full-time safety director who insures employees have safe working areas and equipment. One result of the employees perceiving that USAA cares for them and that USAA is actually making things healthier and safer for them, is USAA's absentee rate which is 45% below the national average. Helping individuals meet their potential have been the highly successful USAA education and training programs. Soon after McDermott arrived at USAA, he decided to centralize training and education and brought on board a professional educator to do it. McDermott's programs had two great impacts. First, there was visible improvem
    But there are many ways insurers' costs can be reduced through more efficient operation, and through more effective advocacy of health and safety programs. Some companies, like USAA in San Antonio, operate much more efficiently than the industry average. According to NICO (National Insurance Consumer Organization -a Nader group) auto insurance rates would drop by an average of 17% nationally if all companies were as efficient as USAA. And USAA provides a 14% dividend to its cooperative owners [11].
    In testimony before the same committee, Harvey Rosenfield, the author of California's Proposition 103 also had positive words for USAA in contrast to other insurers:
    Moreover, a huge portion of the premium dollar goes to waste and inefficiency on a massive level. For example, according to Best Aggregates and Averages (1988) 23 cents of every dollar of auto insurance Fireman's Fund wrote in 1987 went to claims adjustments and defense lawyers' fees and 28.9 cents went to agent's commissions, executive salaries and other overhead expenses. Contrast that with USAA, a company which itself does exceptionally well in the insurance business and is appreciated by its customers for its excellent service. It paid 12.3 cents per premium dollar to its lawyers, and 6.9 cents per dollar to overhead [15].
    USAA has continued to provide service to its members with integrity and distinction, but also has consistently made profits to protect the members' interests and to keep products at a level as inexpensive as possible. In Appendix 1 is a chart which dramatizes the tremendous growth in USAA under General McDermott from the end of 1968 to 1988. As this article goes into publications, the dramatic growth has continued in all the areas noted. For example, USAA's owned and managed assets now exceed 16 billion dollars and USAA has almost 13,000 employees. A National Leader for Automobile Safety McDermott has long been a proponent of vehicle safety. For over a decade he has worked with automobile manufacturers, insurance institutes, private sector businesses, local and national politicians, and the media to secure improved automobile safety equipment and better safety legislation for the country. To this end, he has also initiated two separate safety campaigns, one in 1982 and one in 1988. These addressed the problem of deaths, injuries and property damage incurred through unsafe driving and inadequate safety technology. General McDermott held a national press conference on safety in Washington, D.C. on January 5, 1982.. He also made an appearance on the McNeil-Lehrer Report on the next night. During the interview, he further touted the use of passive restraints and called for prompt governmental acceptance of more rigid safety standards for automobiles. During the 1982 safety campaign, McDermott made history by making USAA the first insurance company to publish a comprehensive report on the comparative safety of domestic and foreign automobiles. The report, produced in conjunction with the Insurance Institute for Highway Safety (HHS), showed the statistical results of actual automobile crashes involving injuries and deaths. It listed which automobiles were most "crashworthy," and which were more likely to cause injury or death in a crash [10]. Another aspect of the first safety campaign was General McDermott's testimony at the November 28, 1983, Department of Transportation Hearing in Los Angeles, California. The thrust of his testimony was to point out the indecisiveness and ambivalence with which the government has treated auto safety by not mandating better passive restraint technology - air bangs in particular -- to automobile manufacturers. As not only an insurance company executive, but also a father and grandfather, he implored haste in implementing improved safety legislation and recommended "a pragmatic, action-oriented approach to get passive restraint technology into existing cars and built into the net generation of automobiles" [9]. An even more extensive and far-reaching safety campaign known as DRIVE SMART was sanctioned by General McDermott in 1988. At the campaign kickoff on Wednesday, March 30, 1988 at a press conference in Washington, D.C., General McDermott announced that USAA would imitate the most extensive package of auto insurance discounts and incentives ever offered [3]. These incentives and discounts were recognized by then-Secretary of Transportation Jim Burnley as bellwether actions in corporate leadership. He stated in a message at the press conference, "I am delighted to say that General Robert F. McDermott, Chairman of the United Services Automobile Association, has accepted the challenge and in turn is setting the standard for the insurance industry. This is not only a fine example of private sector initiative, but of the leadership industry can provide and credibility it can lend in developing public support for new safety technology. " Ralph Nader also stated that "USAA was setting the pace for Allstate, State Farm, Travelers and others" [12]. Included in USAA's program were an Air Bag Safety Bonus and Air Bag Replacement Guarantee, an Air Bag Premium Discount, a Child Safety Seat Discount, an Anti-Lock Brake Discount and other incentives as well. The DRIVE SMART campaign began in San Antonio, Texas, in early April and will continue through 1989 and beyond. In the campaign, USAA spearheads a group of 35 business, community, educational and religious organizations pledging to commit time and resources to reduce traffic injuries and fatalities on American roads. The purpose of the campaign is multi-dimensional, informing people on the four general topics including responsible driving, the use of restraints, proper vehicle maintenance, and buying "smart cars" - cars with the latest safety features. To this end, General McDermott authorized USAA's development of a variety of materials and services to support the campaign. These included billboards, bench ads, taxi and bus ad boards, safety-related videotapes, dozens of public service announcements (PSAs) for radio and television, posters, brochures, bumper stickers, decals and safety displays. Many of the materials were produced in English and Spanish to widen their audience appeal. These materials were also made available without USAA logos so that organizations could use their own logos or message. USAA made these available at no cost to any organization willing to promote the idea of automobile safety. Soon the campaign took on a statewide and nationwide focus. The Texas Highway Department adopted the theme and expanded it to DRIVE SMART TEXAS, placing DRIVE SMART TEXAS signs near entrances and exits of high-traffic areas in the state. Through the cooperation of some business sector participants (e.g. Taco Bell and 7-Eleven), the campaign entered regional and national markets through television advertising and distribution of USAA-produced DRIVE SMART materials at their locations. Public service ads in magazines were then focused toward both military and civilian communities throughout the country. McDermott carried the safety message personally to a national audience in September 1988 when he keynoted the second National Injury Control Conference. The conference was sponsored by the U.S. Center for Disease Control, and about 500 physicians, researchers and educators attended. Additionally, a USAA-sponsored DRIVE SMART AMERICA display appeared at both the National Conference of State Legislatures in Reno, Nevada, and the U.S. Hispanic Chamber of Commerce 1988 National Convention in Washington, D.C. for the purpose of enhancing political interest on safety issues. In all, a total of over 6.5 billion nationwide media impressions for DRIVE SMART were made in 1988. In January of 1989, Diane Stead, Administrator of the National Highway Traffic Safety Administration wrote a letter to McDermott. In it she said she wished "to personally commend you on the actions taken by USAA throughout the year to increase the safety of our nation's motoring public" [22]. McDermott's Contributions to San Antonio In a tribute to Robert McDermott recently, Mayor Henry Cisneros of San Antonio stated that "when the economic history of San Antonio in the 1980s is written, the most influential individual will be him (McDermott)" [4]. After his arrival in San Antonio, McDermott was selected as President of the Greater San Antonio Chamber of Commerce. In this position he initiated the San Antonio Economic Development Council which began a drive to bring business development into San Antonio. When the Hispanic population felt they were not being included, McDermott founded United San Antonio which pulled all the disparate community groups together. In the 1980s he was responsible for getting an undergraduate engineering program at the University of Texas at San Antonio first and later graduate programs in the sciences. With this groundwork laid, he began moving in a formal sense to make San Antonio a biotechnology center for the future. He founded the Texas Research and Technology Foundation, which was established to develop a Texas Research Park. He also helped arrange for the first major gift of $15,000,000 for the park from H. Ross Perot. Today he is regarded as the key influential business leader in San Antonio. In addition to his personal contributions, McDermott believes that USAA should be a corporate good citizen, and it has been so. USAA's Volunteer Corps gave over 30m000 volunteer hours to San Antonio just last year and USA is the city's largest private-sector United Way contributor. Although USAA employees constitute only 2% of San Antonio's work force, they contributed 10% of the total monies collected by United Way. Promulgating Ethical Ideals In addition to what McDermott has done to instill a system of corporate ethics and to integrate it into normal business activity, he has made two other major contributions as well. He is the Chairman of the International Leadership Center Foundation in Dallas. This Foundation supports Leadership America, recognized as the premier off-campus leadership training program for college students in the country. The mission of the Foundation has four principal parts: -Providing ideas, advice and personal involvement to aid the Center in broadening the vision of current and emerging leaders by improving their leadership capabilities; -Formulating policies that insure excellence in all Center activities; -Promulgating high traditional American moral and ethical values that underlie successful leadership through all Foundation and Center activities; -Designing, developing and implementing plans that insure the financial stability and growth of the International Leadership Center. Participating students have all agreed that the Leadership America Program ahs had a major impact upon them because it shows the importance of ethics and values as a foundation for leadership. As a second major action, USAA is underwriting a series of four nationally-televised programs under the title "Raising Good Kids in Bad Times." Produced by Emmy Award-winning producer Arnold Shapiro, the first program, "See Dick and Jane Lie, Cheat and Steal: Teaching Morality to Kids," will air on U.S. Commercial stations in April. Tom Selleck will host the program. Other films will include "The Truth About Teaching," hosted by Whoopi Goldberg, "The American Dream Contest," hosted by Michael Landon, "New & Improved Kids," with Loni Anderson, and James Garner holding the reins on "Take Me to your Leaders." The series has already been contracted by over 98% of the national television market. Robert F. McDermott's achievements in his chosen careers and his efforts on behalf of the insurance and financial services industry, his community and our society and nation resulted in his selection to the American National Business Hall of Fame in 1989. His achievements underline that personal ethical conduct, integrity and respect for God and country provide a foundation for success when carried into the world of business. *This article by Paul T. Ringenbach was originally published in The Journal of Business Leadership, Volume 3, Number 2, Summer 1990. *Copyright 1990. The American National Business Hall of Fame. All rights reserved. No portion of ANBHF may be duplicated, redistributed or manipulated without the expressed permission of the ANBHF. REFERENCES 1. Alster, Norm. (1989, February 13). What flexible workers can do. Fortune, p. 64.2. Best's Insurance Reports. (1989). USAA received an A+ (Superior) rating in Best's Property-Casualty (p. 2625) and Life-Health (p. 2264). Oldwich, NJ: AM Best Company.3. Burnley, James. (Secretary of Transportation). (1988, March 30). [Remarks at a press conference to announce the beginning of the DRIVE SMART safety campaign.] Washington, D.C.4. Cisneros, Henry. (Mayor of San Antonio). (1988, October 6). [Remarks given at the dedication of USAA Towers]. San Antonio, Texas.5. Elkind, Peter. (1987, Spring). McDermott's mission. Best of Business, p. 8-15.6. Hamm, Lt. General Charles R. (Superintendent of the U.S> Air Force Academy). (1988, November 4). {Remarks at the dedication of Arnold Auditorium, United States Military Academy]. West Point, New York.7. IDC Financial Publications, Inc. (1989, February). S&L - Savings Bank Financial Quarterly, p. 82.8. Mack, Toni. (1988, July 25). They have faith in us. Forbes, p. 82.9. McDermott, Robert F. (Chairman USAA). (1983, November 28). [Testimony before the California Department of Transportation]. Los Angeles, California.10. McDermott, Robert F. (1982, January 19). Americans are dying for better gas mileage. Wall Street Journal, p. 13.11. Nader, Ralph. (Founder of Public Interest Research Group). (1988, December 6). [Testimony before the Commerce, Consumer Protection and Competitiveness Sub-Committee, U.S. House of Representatives]. Washington, D.C.12. Nader, Ralph. (Founder of the Center for Auto Safety). (1988, March 20). [Response to the announcement of USAA safety incentives]. Washington, D.C.13. Nussbaum, Bruce, et. Al. (1985, January 21). The new corporate elite. Business Week, p. 63.14. Reich, Kenneth (1988, June 7). USAA again ranks first in satisfaction on auto insurance. Los Angeles Times, p. 3.15. Rosenfield Harvey. (Architect of California's Proposition 103). (1988, December 6). [Testimony before the Commerce, Consumer Protection and Competitiveness Sub-Committee, U.S. House of Representatives]. Washington, D.C.16. Staff. (1970, June). Consumer Reports, p. 433.17. Staff. (1977, June). Consumer Reports, p. 377.18. Staff. (1980, September). Consumer Reports, p. 543.19. Staff. (1984, September). Consumer Reports, p. 508.20. Staff. (1988, October). Which companies offer better service? Consumer Reports, p. 628.21. Staff. (1989, February/March). Twenty-first century mail communications system on-line at insurance concern. Mail: The Journal of Mail Distribution, p. 16-17.15.22. Stead, Diane. (Administrator of the National Highway Safety Administration). (1989, January). [Letter to Robert F. McDermott, USAA]. San Antonio, Texas.23. Turco, Frank. (1988, March 24). Ratio of complaints against 19 insurers stirs state scrutiny. Arizona Republic, p. c7.24. USAA Public Affairs Department. (1985). A mission of trust: USAA Corporate culture. (San Antonio, Texas: USAA Publishing Services.25. USAA Strategic Planning and Analysis. (1988). Strategic planning guidance document. (San Antonio, Texas: USAA Publishing Services.26. Yourdon, Ed. (1989, February 2). Exemplary data processing organizations. American Programmer, p. 26.27. Zemke, Ron, Shaaf, Dick (1989). The service edge. (Foreword by Tom Peters). New York: New American Library.
    nt in the service USAA could provide to its members because of the improved education and training the employees received. Second, was the great morale factor it proved to be. McDermott began off-duty educational programs offered in USAA facilities and paid 100% tuition reimbursement for employees attending colleges and university courses. It did not stop there. He also paid for professional development courses leading to professional designations such as CLU (Chartered Life Underwriter) and CPCU (Chartered Property and Casualty Underwriter). McDermott's centralized training concept has provided USAA with a broad diversity of training from entry-level training for claims and policy service personnel to management development courses to make technical personnel ready to assume supervisory positions. The Management Information Seminar provides senior managers a forum to learn about other divisions of the company and to mingle with other senior USAA executives and senior managers. The result is a free flow of ideas across divisions to help all the diverse elements be of maximum benefit to each other. USAA Growth and Diversification In the first long-range planning meeting at Hamilton, New York, McDermott had set out his vision of growth for USAA. The first order of business was to strengthen and expand the Property and Casualty business which was the heart of the company. Developing the ethical and service policy and strengthening the employees were critical parts of the foundation for growth as was development of computer systems to support the growth and improved service. USAA expansion in the Property and Casualty area had two parts - expanding the geographical area in which USAA could sell insurance and capturing a larger portion of the targeted market. When McDermott arrived, USAA could sell auto insurance in 48 of 50 states, but was able to sell homeowner policies in only 31 of 50 states. As a reciprocal insurance exchange that sold only to military officers this was a problem. When officers were ordered to states where USAA could not sell, membership suffered. McDermott established a corporate legal staff and charged it with getting USAA licensed for both lines in all states. With this underway, he initiated USAA's first corporate marketing staff and charged it with bringing in more members. The combination of the two initiatives resulted in USAA being licensed for auto and homeowner policies in all states, and as of the end of 1988, the penetration of the active duty officer market had reached 97%. When one eliminates those who can not be insured, such as those stationed in Warsaw Pact countries, and those without cars, USAA has close to 100% of those active-duty officers it is willing to insure. Today USAA is the 6th largest private automobile and homeowners insurer in the United States. From the beginning, McDermott combined his own sixth sense with those of members' desires to diversify USAA and add lines he believed could be supported. One of the key innovations was his decision to offer automobile and homeowners insurance to children of members through a new USAA subsidiary. With USAA Board of Directors' support, the program went into full swing and is now the fastest growing portion of the Property and Casualty business at USAA. At the end of 1968, USAA had only a small life insurance program in addition to the property and casualty insurance. As result of formal and informal surveys of members, McDermott wished to expand USAA offerings. Under the original bylaws, this was prohibited and so he had to convince the USAA Board of directors to change them to permit diversification. By virtue of his own persuasion and the desires of the membership, the Board reluctantly agreed. Its reluctance stemmed from the tradition-bound mind-set of those wishing to sell property and casualty insurance only. In 1968, USAA stood 504th among American life insurance companies in terms of life insurance in force, but that was soon to change. At that time, USAA offered only whole life insurance policies. Over the years other products were added to the line, and the life insurance ranking climbed slowly at first and then with increasing intensity. Now the USAA Life Insurance Company offers a full range of life insurance products an has added a number of health insurance products as well. In 1976, a line of annuities was also added. Today USAA stands 55th in national raking based on the dollars of ordinary life insurance in force. Success in life insurance led to further entries into the financial services area. Under the USAA Investment Management Company (IMCO), begun in 1983, 12 no-load mutual funds were added over time, each tailored to different member desires and needs. Some of them include money market, growth, tax-exempt, international and precious metals funds. Today, USAA stands 34th in national mutual fund group ranking. In addition to the mutual funds, a real estate division has offered Real Estate Limited Partnerships. Among the youngest of the financial services offerings, the Real Estate Division turned a profit in 1988 and has great future promise. USAA also added a Discount Brokerage, which now numbers 38,000 active accounts and handles stock transfers for IMCO, cutting USAA costs. Almost from his arrival at USAA, McDermott had wanted to open a bank, but various rules and regulations prohibited insurance companies from doing so. In the early 1980s, deregulation of financial institutions and other legal and regulatory provisions made it seem possible for USAA to open a savings and loan institution. In October of 1983, a window of opportunity opened and McDermott moved quickly. On December 30, 1983, USAA capitalized its new savings and loan with $20,000,000 and opened in a renovated trailer building on the USAA property. USAA members joined at a rapid rate. One pundit at the time pointed out that USAA members felt very strongly about the integrity of USAA and its backing of the savings and loan since they sent money to a trailer pointed at the Mexican border. Today, only six years later, the USAA Federal Savings Bank has over $1 billion in assets and has received top marks from independent raters [7]. Another sign of USAA members' strong faith in USAA and what it backs is the USAA Federal Savings Bank's experience with the MasterCard. USAA sent 240,000 pre-approved credit card applications to members. Industry experts predicted that 10-12% might be a reasonable return based on USAA reputation. In the first couple of months, USAA members returned applications to establish a return rate of over 50%. Today over 1 million USAA MasterCards are in use, and USAA's national standing is fifth in sales volume for all institutions issuing a MasterCard. USAA purchased another financial institution in Utah in 1988 and opened the FDIC-insured USAA Federal Savings Association with a gold MasterCard following shortly thereafter. In 1988, in another McDermott innovation, USAA opened the USAA Towers, a luxury retirement center in San Antonio. The 23-story, $75,000,000 building has won high ratings from the retired community and the retirement industry. Many of the strides McDermott has made in the financial services area have produced accolades from members and have received praise from a variety of respected financial institutions. In 1987, the Nilson Report and NBC's Today Show proclaimed the USAA MasterCard as the number one buy in the country. Many of the mutual funds have been praised as excellent investments in national publications such as Fortune and Money. The USAA Federal Savings Bank was given ICD Financial Publishing's first-ever "perfect" rating for an institution with assets of over $50,000,000[7]. USAA Life Insurance Company has received A.M. Best A+ rating since 1975 and the Property and Casualty Division for much longer [2]. The success of all of these USAA programs has been due to the excellent relationship of mutual trust and confidence built up between USAA and its members based on the ethical conduct and integrity of the customers and the company itself. "Service to the Member" is the watchword continually espoused in USAA and is the clearest expression of USAA's positive relationship with its members. That "Service to the Member" philosophy implanted by McDermott has continued during USAA's rapid growth, and a key element of that service is member contact. As a direct-writer, USAA relies primarily on telephone and postal communication with its members. Over the years, McDermott has guided the staff to a communications status - technologically and from the standpoint of efficiency - that ensures members have fast and direct contact with USAA. In 1969, about 99% of USAA's member contact was by mail. Today USAA relies more on the immediacy of telephone contact. Its employees receive about 17.8 million calls a year, and average daily phone volume is about 65,000 calls. With over 1,000 lines, USAA is the largest single point of termination for WATS lines in the country. Still, USAA continues to rely heavily on use of the mail. It is the nation's largest direct mailer in terms of sales volume and fifth largest internationally. A staff of more than 450, full- and part-time, handle approximately 27 million incoming and 73 million outgoing pieces of mail annually. Technology, combined with employee morale and esprit de corps, ensures USAA members receive the best possible communications service [21]. How well USAA is doing in providing service to its members can be measured in a number of ways. The steady growth of USAA and success of its diversification efforts are surely one measure. Another are surveys USAA administers to members which show great member satisfaction. It would be easy to write off USAA's surveys of its own members, but the findings have been confirmed in a number of other places by different institutions. For example, the October 1988 issue of Consumer Reports picked USAA as one of the best three companies in the nation in terms of service. The other two were much smaller firms [20]. This was the 4th such judgment by Consumer Reports over the past 20 years [16, 17, 18, 19]. USAA had the best record in the state for both homeowners and private auto insurance in terms of the fewest number of complaints per one thousand policyholders [14]. The Arizona Insurance Department had the same findings for USAA personal lines insurance [23]. In an industry categorized as a "service Industry", USAA is clearly one of the national leaders due to the leadership of Robert McDermott. In its January 21, 1985 issue, Business Week selected 50 leaders who were representative of the new corporate elite. Of the 9 selected in the "service Gurus" category, McDermott was the only CEO of an insurance firm selected [13]. In the July 25, 1988, Forbes, McDermott said in an interview with Toni Mack that , "if you put service number one, everything else will follow," and so it has [8]. Most recently USAA was among 101 companies singled out in the 1989 book The Service Edge by Ron Zemke with Dick Schaaf [27]. In his foreword to the book, Tom Peters said that the 101 companies described will hopefully have "good management at the top, and throughout any firm, to appreciate just what an unstinting dedication to service can amount to - and to challenge each and every one of us about making such a commitment in our own outfits" [27]. It is clear that providing great service to its own members, USAA has caught national attention as well. McDermott's leadership qualities, within and outside the insurance industry, and his concern for community and country were also reflected in a Best of Business Quarterly interview that appeared in the journal's Spring 1987 issue [5]. Fiscal Management Providing great service has not been done without consideration of the bottom line. USAA has consistently maintained the lowest cost/expense ratio in the insurance industry and has paid dividends to members every year. In the aftermath of the insurance revolt in California in the November 1988 election, consumer advocate Ralph Nader testified before the House Commerce, Consumer Protection, and Competitiveness Subcommittee on December 6, 1988.Although Nader excoriated the insurance industry, he had positive testimony for USAA. He stated:
  • Vitality and Maverick Spirit. Can do as ….
  • ., all integrated through the design process. The key to success in mechatronics is: modeling, analysis, experimentation & hardware-implementation skills.
  • ., all integrated through the design process. The key to success in mechatronics is: modeling, analysis, experimentation & hardware-implementation skills.
  • ., all integrated through the design process. The key to success in mechatronics is: modeling, analysis, experimentation & hardware-implementation skills.
  • ., all integrated through the design process. The key to success in mechatronics is: modeling, analysis, experimentation & hardware-implementation skills.
  • Cybernetics is a theory of the communication and control of regulatory feedback. The term cybernetics stems from the Greek kybernetes (meaning steersman, governor, pilot, or rudder). Cybernetics is the discipline that studies communication and control in living beings and in the machines built by humans.
    A more philosophical definition, suggested in 1958 by Louis Couffignal, one of the pioneers of cybernetics in the 1930s, considers cybernetics as "the art of assuring efficiency of action" (see external links for reference).
  • Cybernetics is a theory of the communication and control of regulatory feedback. The term cybernetics stems from the Greek kybernetes (meaning steersman, governor, pilot, or rudder). Cybernetics is the discipline that studies communication and control in living beings and in the machines built by humans.
    A more philosophical definition, suggested in 1958 by Louis Couffignal, one of the pioneers of cybernetics in the 1930s, considers cybernetics as "the art of assuring efficiency of action" (see external links for reference).
  • http://www.robotdirectory.org/pics/cakemonster/Nano-Scoop3.jpg
  • ., all integrated through the design process. The key to success in mechatronics is: modeling, analysis, experimentation & hardware-implementation skills.
  • Metrology (from Greek 'metron' (measure), and -logy) is the science of measurement. Metrology includes all theoretical and practical aspects of measurement.
  • ., all integrated through the design process. The key to success in mechatronics is: modeling, analysis, experimentation & hardware-implementation skills.
  • Workforce Knowledge and Skill Mergers
    1. Skilled (Blue)-Professional (White)
    2. Mecha-Computers-Electronics
    3. Engineering-Technical-Scientific
    K-12 Mergers
    1. CTE-Gen acad-Arts
    2. Applied, theoretical, contextual
    3. K-12-CTC-University-Industry
    4. Technical-Engineering-Scientific
    TSTC Strategic Mergers
    IT-Mecha-Graphics and all programsa almost
  • Workforce Knowledge and Skill Mergers
    1. Skilled (Blue)-Professional (White)
    2. Mecha-Computers-Electronics
    3. Engineering-Technical-Scientific
    K-12 Mergers
    1. CTE-Gen acad-Arts
    2. Applied, theoretical, contextual
    3. K-12-CTC-University-Industry
    4. Technical-Engineering-Scientific
    TSTC Strategic Mergers
    IT-Mecha-Graphics and all programsa almost
  • Workforce Knowledge and Skill Mergers
    1. Skilled (Blue)-Professional (White)
    2. Mecha-Computers-Electronics
    3. Engineering-Technical-Scientific
    K-12 Mergers
    1. CTE-Gen acad-Arts
    2. Applied, theoretical, contextual
    3. K-12-CTC-University-Industry
    4. Technical-Engineering-Scientific
    TSTC Strategic Mergers
    IT-Mecha-Graphics and all programsa almost
  • ., all integrated through the design process. The key to success in mechatronics is: modeling, analysis, experimentation & hardware-implementation skills.
  • ., all integrated through the design process. The key to success in mechatronics is: modeling, analysis, experimentation & hardware-implementation skills.
  • Accd mars

    1. 1. Pre DACUM thinking, tools and examples
    2. 2. Part I Where did you leave off yesterday? What will you learn today? What is the one problem or opportunity you really want to work on? 1, 2, 3 Where are we going? Who am I? Where are you?
    3. 3. Part II Technopolis (Kozmetsky) TEAMS Forecasting Tools (Bettersworth) Example Technology Flows DACUM Example Technology Jobs TEAMS PATHWAYS in the USA Example TEAMS Pathways Technopolis TEAMS Strategies for the Technopolis Educational Technology Flow Technology Structure (Sekora) Engineering Production Pipeline R&D&C - Commercialization (Zintgraff)
    4. 4. Maze – How do we model these problems?
    5. 5. Maze – How do we incorporate soft skills?
    6. 6. Maze – How do we incorporate enthusiam?
    7. 7. Engagement 21st Century Learning Styles Andragogy-Pedagogy
    8. 8. Space Teams, ACCD
    9. 9. Space Teams, ACCD
    10. 10. Space Teams, ACCD
    11. 11. Space Teams, ACCD
    12. 12. Tell me what you see..
    13. 13. In order to answer your questions of Maze, we have to ask these questions of ourselves and perform the answers through action today.
    14. 14. In order to answer your questions of Maze, we have to ask these questions of ourselves and perform the answers through action today. Today we seek authenticity. The best in ourselves. We seek alignment. A spirit of experimentation and intellectual honesty.
    15. 15. Please help me 2 Volunteer Scribe 1 fast typer and 1 neat hand writer
    16. 16. Please help me 2 Volunteer Scribe 1 fast typer and 1 neat hand writer 1 Keeper of Christmas-the bell
    17. 17. Part I Where did you leave off yesterday? What will you learn today? What is the one problem or opportunity you really want to work on? 1, 2, 3 Where are we going? Who am I? Where are you?
    18. 18. What will you learn today? See it Map it Think it Design it for yourself….
    19. 19. Tools & Techniques
    20. 20. Some stories, Socratic dialogue and some thinking- doing tools…
    21. 21. And a mode shift to doing…
    22. 22. …a shift to transdisciplinarity…
    23. 23. Transdisciplinarios
    24. 24. Piensa & Haz
    25. 25. Cómo nos organizamos?
    26. 26. Transdisciplinarity Beyond the disciplines Engaging the real world Learning connected to doing Solving real world problems Little experiments
    27. 27. Transdisciplinarity… Theoretical Knowledge Applied Learning Real world problem or opportunity
    28. 28. Yang Cai, Ingo Snel, Betty Chenga, Suman Bharathi, Clementine Klein d, Judith Klein- Seetharaman; Carnegie Mellon University, University of Frankfurt, Research Institute, University of Pittsburgh School of Medicine. www.andrew.cmu.edu/~ycai/biogam
    29. 29. I have something for you to think about individually for the next hour or so and the rest of the day. Please get a piece of paper and a pen…
    30. 30. Part I Where did you leave off yesterday? What will you learn today? What is the one problem or opportunity you really want to work on? 1, 2, 3 Where are we going? Who am I? Where are you?
    31. 31. What is the one problem or opportunity you really want to work on? 1, 2, 3
    32. 32. You graduate Friday…
    33. 33. What is your takeaway?
    34. 34. What will you do next?
    35. 35. What is the one problem or opportunity you really want to work on? 1, 2, 3
    36. 36. Transdisciplinarity… Theoretical Knowledge Applied Learning Real world problem or opportunity
    37. 37. What is the one problem or opportunity you really want to work on? 1, 2, 3 Question Zero Time
    38. 38. Keep the answer to your self for now.
    39. 39. Part I Where did you leave off yesterday? What will you learn today? What is the one problem or opportunity you really want to work on? 1, 2, 3 Where are we going? Who am I? Where are you?
    40. 40. We are going?
    41. 41. Mars And beyond
    42. 42. Burns Cliff Image NASA/JPL
    43. 43. Skill Mergers ? Mars Opportunity Rover
    44. 44. Burns Cliff Image NASA/JPL
    45. 45. Skill Mergers ? Mars Opportunity Rover
    46. 46. March 25, 2014 Courtesy of Charmed Labs
    47. 47. March 25, 2014 Courtesy of Charmed Labs Gigapan viewer demonstration
    48. 48. gigapan.org
    49. 49. Zoomgigapan.org
    50. 50. Margarita
    51. 51. Structure of Technology
    52. 52. October 4, 1957
    53. 53. “San Antonio is Moon : Mars City. First man to walk on Mars will be from San Antonio.“90+ Years Old: Kane, Sinkin and Dr. Juhasz. Maverick: “Can do” as Dr. G.P. Singh from Karta would say! Dr. Francis Kane A founding father of GPS and creator of the GPS International Association, a group for GPS users.
    54. 54. What trends are placing pressure on education and educators to change?
    55. 55. v GlobalS&T Demography
    56. 56. http://www.3dnworld.com/users/1/images/UltimateEarth.jpg Talk Story Maui Community College, April 2008
    57. 57. “We are seeing brain drain fluctuate between 21% and 44%.” --Jeanne Unemori Skog and Leslie Wilkins, medb
    58. 58. The number of jobs requiring technical training is growing at five times the rate of other occupations. Innovate America, U.S. Council on Competitiveness
    59. 59. “We need to prepare a high tech workforce or we will have to import workers from the outside.” --Mayor Charmain Tavares, Maui
    60. 60. “There is hidden poverty in Maui…” “The Indian reservation on the mainland is like home—I see poverty, alcohol abuse, drug abuse… the same problems.” “There are more native Hawaiians in jail per capita than any other population in the US.”
    61. 61. “There are kids on Maui who have never been to the top of the mountain or to Hana much less have they traveled off of the island.” http://www.flickr.com/photos/fotographis/528878003/sizes/o/ “There are kids on Maui who have never been to the top of the Halealaka or to Hana much less have they traveled off of the island.”
    62. 62. The key 21st Century issues: war, environmental degradation, globalization, population explosion, hunger, poverty and the…
    63. 63. The key 21st Century issues: …competitiveness of the military, companies, students and workers.
    64. 64. “I do not think Maui is any different than the mainland…post industrialization has placed greater demands on math and education.” –Rose Yamada, elder
    65. 65. Nueva era
    66. 66. Era Industrial ERA INFO Cambio-Histórico, Económico & Social ?
    67. 67. Adapted from Charles Ostman Senior Fellow Institute for Global Futures NEURO NANO BIOINFO S&T Convergence
    68. 68. Informática Biología QuímicaFísica Ingeniería Scientific and Technological Convergence
    69. 69. http://www.3dnworld.com/users/1/images/UltimateEarth.jpg
    70. 70. “Ahupua’a” Integrated, wholistic system
    71. 71. “Ho’ohanalima” Learning by doing
    72. 72. Waipulani Longitudinal Algae Research Project – Kihei Charter School
    73. 73. The Maui Coastal Land Trust restoration of a 250 acre Waihe’e Coastal
    74. 74. . Environmental impact study during the reconstruction of Koie’ie Fishpond located in north Kihei– Kihei Charter School
    75. 75. Makena Hawaiian Green Sea Turtle Fibropapiloma Virus Study– Kihei Charter School
    76. 76. Opihi Population Health Assessment Research Study– Kihei Charter School
    77. 77. Transdisciplinary Systemics
    78. 78. Transdisciplinarity… Theoretical Knowledge Applied Learning Real world problem or opportunity
    79. 79. “We need to strengthen teachers…connect learning and doing…the world is changing…it’s OK to learn with your students.” –Rose Yamada, Elder
    80. 80. “We need to integrate and expand CTE systematically.” --Bruce Henderson, Superintendant, CAS, Maui
    81. 81. Forecasting Bettersworth
    82. 82. www.kurzweilai.net/.../ SIN_headshot_highres.html “porque estamos duplicando el ritmo de progreso cada década, veremos un siglo de progreso--al ritmo de hoy-- en sólo 25 años calendario.”
    83. 83. Nanotechnology Fuel Cells Homeland Security ADM, Hybrid, MEMS, Computer Forensics Wireless: M2M Mechatronics Home Technology IntegrationBiotechnology Digital Games Demand for Multi-Disciplinary Learners & Workers
    84. 84. forecasting.tstc.edu
    85. 85. Digital Convergence 4th Generation Computing Mechatronics 21st Century Architecture
    86. 86. (Harbor Research, 2003)
    87. 87. (Harbor Research, 2003) 1994 - 2004
    88. 88. (Harbor Research, 2003)
    89. 89. (Harbor Research, 2003) 2004 - 2014
    90. 90. http://www.nasa.gov/multimedia/imagegallery/image_feature_598.html
    91. 91. Qué es esto?
    92. 92. Mi hija, Ava Marie
    93. 93. 4a GEN
    94. 94. http://www-bsac.eecs.berkeley.edu/archive/users/warneke-brett/SmartDust/ Berkeley’s Golem Dust 11.7 mm3 total circumscribed volume ~4.8 mm3 total displaced volume Berkeley’s Deputy Dust 6.6 mm3 total circumscribed volume 4th Gen 11.7 mm3 6.6 mm3
    95. 95. http://shino8.eng.uci.edu/Pdf/Tomo_MIT_Mems.pdfintel-research.net/ berkeley/features/tiny_db.asp Berkeley Motes /berkeley.intel-research.net/paulos/research/connexus/ www-bsac.eecs.berkeley.edu/archive/users/warneke-brett/SmartDust/ 4th Gen combines computing, communications and energy into a single platform enabling remote human and machine interaction with physical, chemical, biological and neurological objects, systems, processes and environments.
    96. 96. http://www.welectronics.com/gsm/Nokia/Nokia_3220.HTML What is this?
    97. 97. http://www.outsidethetent.com/wp/archives/category/white-house/
    98. 98. http://shino8.eng.uci.edu/Pdf/Tomo_MIT_Mems.pdf intel-research.net/ berkeley/features/tiny_db.asp /berkeley.intel-research.net/paulos/research/connexus/ Intel/Berkeley Connexus www-bsac.eecs.berkeley.edu/archive/users/warneke-brett/SmartDust/ Berkeley Motes New H2H Relations
    99. 99. http://www.msnbc.msn.com/id/7643818/ Qué es esto?
    100. 100. http://www.adidas.com/campaigns/adidas_1/content/downloads/adidas_1- wp_02_1280_1024.jpg http://www.adidasprlookbook.com/adidas1/index.asp Soy un Robot caminante.
    101. 101. Home Technology
    102. 102. Construction Patent thin-nickel-strip magneto-strictive sensor (MsS™). Applicable to airplanes, ships, plants, pipelines and bridges. US 80 billion square feet of commercial and government facilities and buildings, and more than 100 billion square feet of dams and bridges (Sensametrics, 2003). One trillion dollar market (Elgamal). http://www.swri.org/3pubs/ttoday/fall03/Future.htm SwRI MsS™ http://www.swri.edu/3pubs/IRD2002/14-9285.htm
    103. 103. Security and Process Control SCADA $3.1 B (2004) to over $4 B (2007). SCADA security software to grow by 50% annually through 2007 (Kuykendall, 2004). RF Modules 1.9 MM units (2004) to climb to 165 MM units (2010) (Legg, 2004). Industrial wireless sensors $24 MM (2001) over $100 MM (2008) (Donoho, 2002). NovusEDGE Armida DevicePoint
    104. 104. Utilities A California study indicates that peak-rate usage can be shaved by 20 percent if utilities used Automated Meter Reading (ARM) for accurate pricing information--each megawatt of reduction can equate to $400,000 in savings per year (Jackson, 2004, p. 1) saving California utilities and consumers at least $5 billion a year. http://www.utilitiesproject.com/documents.asp?grID=85&d_ID=2402 More than 25 million AMR units installed on gas (21 percent), water (11 percent), and electric utility (16 percent) meters. 200 million units yet to be changed out to AMR (Jackson, 2004).
    105. 105. 1. Surge of start-up companies, attributable to the legacy telecom slowness to innovate. 2. Cross appropriation of industrial control processes to DoD, homeland security, transportation and consumer electronics 3. Cross appropriation of transportation- based telematics to human, property and livestock tracking 4. Convergent sciences (nano-bio-info- cogno-enviro) expand the applications of M2M, decrease the cost, open up direct manipulation of chemical and biological processes. http://www.sfgate.com/cgi-bin/article.cgi?file=/chronicle/archive/2000/11/20/MN62513.DTL&type=science
    106. 106. 1. Surge of start-up companies, attributable to the legacy telecom slowness to innovate. 2. Cross appropriation of industrial control processes to DoD, homeland security, transportation and consumer electronics 3. Cross appropriation of transportation- based telematics to human, property and livestock tracking 4. Convergent sciences (nano-bio-info- cogno-enviro) expand the applications of M2M, decrease the cost, open up direct manipulation of chemical and biological processes. http://www.sfgate.com/cgi-bin/article.cgi?file=/chronicle/archive/2000/11/20/MN62513.DTL&type=science
    107. 107. Digital Convergence 4th Generation Computing Mechatronics 21st Century Architecture
    108. 108. Mecatrónica La combinación sinergística de la ingeniería mecánica, la ingeniería eléctrica, la ingeniería de “software”, la ingeniería de sistemas de control. Departamentos de Ingeniería Mecánica, Aeroespacial y Nuclear en RPI All Contents Copyright(C) 2001 Mechatronics Lab at RPI
    109. 109. If you have an automobile made in the past 10 years, your car has more computing power than rockets used to put man on the moon. TSTC West TX, Sweetwater, 10.31.2006
    110. 110. http://www.xpcarteam.com/ XP Vehicle Systems Features: Over 2500 mile range using our patented XPack Multi-Core(TM) power plant, energy is delivered to you when you need it, inflatable frame technology, extensive ability to customize and mitigate obsolescence (EVERYTHING is upgradeable), you assemble or dealer assemble, direct ships to you, some models can change bodies, some models fold after assemble for storage or parking.
    111. 111. http://www.toyota.com/prius/index.html?s_van=GM_TN_HYBRID_PRIUS Qué es esto?
    112. 112. http://www.toyota.com/prius/index.html?s_van=GM_TN_HYBRID_PRIUS Soy un Robot
    113. 113. Mecatrónica La combinación sinergística de la ingeniería mecánica, la ingeniería eléctrica, la ingeniería de “software”, la ingeniería de sistemas de control. Departamentos de Ingeniería Mecánica, Aeroespacial y Nuclear en RPI All Contents Copyright(C) 2001 Mechatronics Lab at RPI
    114. 114. Máquinas Inteligentes
    115. 115. PRIUS+ team: we built the first PRIUS+ conversion Sept 11-22, 2004, starting with a low-cost lead-acid battery pack. Pictured are (L-R) Ron Gremban, Felix Kramer, Marc Geller, Kevin Lyons, Andrew Lawton. See About CalCars for names of those who helped but are not pictured.
    116. 116. http://www.calcars.org/photos.html
    117. 117. 1,000 MPG eq. Fuel Cell Car
    118. 118. Los Altos Academy of Engineering, La Puente Valley ROP, California
    119. 119. http://bleex.me.berkeley.edu/CV/Berkeley-Exo-HR.jpg 100-pound exoskeleton and a 70- pound backpack while feeling as if he were lugging a mere 5 pounds
    120. 120. http://www.terremoto.ca/images/exoskeleton.jpg Hal 3 may some day replace the wheel chair for many people..
    121. 121. http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Wireless_capsule_endoscopy Video Camera en una Pildora Soy un Robot
    122. 122. http://www.rsc.org/ej/LC/2006/b507312j/b507312j-f2.gif http://www.rsc.org/ejga/LC/2006/b507312j-ga.gif Un Laboratorio En Una Píldora Soy un Robot
    123. 123. Digital Convergence 4th Generation Computing Mechatronics 21st Century Architecture
    124. 124. Bio-Mecatrónica La combinación sinergística de la Biología, la ingeniería mecánica, la ingeniería eléctrica, la ingeniería de “software”, la ingeniería de sistemas de control. Adapted from Departamentos de Ingeniería Mecánica, Aeroespacial y Nuclear en RPI All Contents Copyright(C) 2001 Mechatronics Lab at RPI Biología
    125. 125. MIT Tech Review, 2005 Sensors Physical Chemical Biological http://www.rieti.go.jp/en/events/bbl/03102801.pdf , page 16 Actuators Physical Chemical Biological PhiloMetron™
    126. 126. Nanobiónica Bacteria Atada Bacterua Nadadora Velocidad de natación ~ 20-30 µm Protones flux/motor ~ 1200 proton/rev Bacteria Atada Eficiencia del Motor ~ 90-100 % Fuerza de Salida ~ 2.9×10-4 pW Torsión en motor parado~ 4600 pN-nm  Nano-motor (45 nm de ancho) Ingeniería Genética E. coli inofensivo Mohamed Al-Fandi, Ph.D. Profesor Asistente Depto. De Ingeniería Mecánica y Biomecánica Universidad de Texas San Antonio
    127. 127. University of Texas at San Antonio
    128. 128. Technical applications of biological molecules including protein-based materials, DNA-based materials, biomineralization, cellular systems and bioelectronics. http://www.nanobionics3.de/ NanoBionics
    129. 129. Bio-Mecatrónica La combinación sinergística de la Biología, la ingeniería mecánica, la ingeniería eléctrica, la ingeniería de “software”, la ingeniería de sistemas de control. Adapted from Departamentos de Ingeniería Mecánica, Aeroespacial y Nuclear en RPI All Contents Copyright(C) 2001 Mechatronics Lab at RPI Biología
    130. 130. Micro-robotics team and biologists at Tsukuba University Source: The Guardian Date: 2 May 2002 State University of New York (Suny) Biotronics New Relations "Go go gadget: With a remote control sensor hotwired to its central nervous system, developments like the "roborat," created at SUNY's Downstate Medical Center, herald the coming of the biotronic age.
    131. 131. Physicians are using VNS from last 10 years to treat epilepsy to slash seizures till upto 40 percent. October 2005 study revealed that after using this VNS technique by severely depressed patients ninety-one percent retained their recovery in nine months. http://www.medgear.org/page/4/
    132. 132. https://www.carle.com/Hospital/about/images/Ear%20Diagram3.jpg Bio-Mecatrónica
    133. 133. The goal is to create artificial "biohybrid" limbs that merge man-made components with human tissue -- muscles, skeletal architecture and the neurological system --and work like fully functioning human appendages.
    134. 134. Necesita -mos pensar más allá de éstos v v
    135. 135. http://web.mit.edu/nanoengineering/research/microfab.shtml Micro-Mecatrónica
    136. 136. ORNL, esta imagen muestra una nanosonda, con una punta 1,000 veces más fina que un cabello humano, penetrando una célula. La sonda puede entrar, llevar a cabo una medición en el lugar y retirarse sin destruir la célula. ww.ornl.gov/info/press_releases/get_press_release.cfm?ReleaseNumber=mr20040714-00 Optica-Mecatrónica
    137. 137. Un glóbulo rojo artificial – el respirocito [41]. Diseñador Robert A. Freitas Jr. ©1999 Forrest Bishop. http://www.imminst.org/freitas.html “Un medio litro de respirocitos… permitiría a una persona retener su respiración en el fondo de una piscina por hasta 4 horas…”
    138. 138. Adapted from NSFNEURO NANO BIOINFO 21st Century Architecture
    139. 139. Adapted from Charles Ostman Senior Fellow Institute for Global Futures NEURO NANO BIOINFO S&T Convergence
    140. 140. Informática Biología QuímicaFísica Ingeniería Scientific and Technological Convergence
    141. 141. Transdisciplinarios
    142. 142. Piensa & Haz
    143. 143. Cómo nos organizamos?
    144. 144. Transdisciplinarity Beyond the disciplines Engaging the real world Learning connected to doing Solving real world problems Little experiments
    145. 145. Transdisciplinarity… Theoretical Knowledge Applied Learning Real world problem or opportunity
    146. 146. Era Industrial ERA INFO Cambio-Histórico, Económico & Social ?
    147. 147. Nueva era
    148. 148. Era Industrial ERA INFO Cambio-Histórico, Económico & Social Era Cibernética
    149. 149. ?
    150. 150. Cybernetics is the discipline that studies and creates communication and control systems in living organisms and in the machines built by humans. Greek kybernetes (meaning steersman, governor, pilot, or rudder).
    151. 151. Evolution of the cognitive and physical division of labor between Humans and Machines
    152. 152. Mars And beyond
    153. 153. Structure of Technology BREAK
    154. 154. Part I Where did you leave off yesterday? What will you learn today? What is the one problem or opportunity you really want to work on? 1, 2, 3 Where are we going? Who am I? Where are you?
    155. 155. TEAMS ORGANIZATION
    156. 156. Who are you? Color Dots Disciplines – Group network in TEAMS of 7. What are your disciplines? Vote on large post it and then find a table of your peers. Sit by someone you have not spent much time with yet. Zero Time
    157. 157. You promise me I/We take responsibility for our learning and what is possible for us today as a individuals and TEAMS.
    158. 158. I promise you By the end of the day we will all answer your questions of Maze by example and we will come to a sense of closure as to why we are here, what we have learned and what we can do with our San Antonio experience.
    159. 159. Please help me In order to accomplish all that is possible we have a need for speed-lightness of foot-today. Let’s treat the day as physical- mental exercise. You are in the jim (GYM).
    160. 160. Where are we going?
    161. 161. Mars And beyond
    162. 162. MARGARITA
    163. 163. Mission to Mars Theoretical Knowledge Applied Learning Real world problem or opportunity
    164. 164. Part I Where did you leave off yesterday? What will you learn today? What is the one problem or opportunity you really want to work on? 1, 2, 3 Where are we going? Who am I? Where are you?
    165. 165. Part II Technopolis (Kozmetsky) TEAMS Forecasting Tools (Bettersworth) Example Technology Flows DACUM Example Technology Jobs TEAMS PATHWAYS in the USA Example TEAMS Pathways Technopolis TEAMS Strategies for the Technopolis Educational Technology Flow Technology Structure (Sekora) Engineering Production Pipeline R&D&C - Commercialization (Zintgraff)
    166. 166. LUNCH & BUS Assignment Sit in teams and with team members on bus and at lunch. Please complete the following assignment.
    167. 167. TEAMS TASK 3 Mission Zero Time (Lunch & Bus Ride)
    168. 168. TEAMS TASK 3 Mission Zero Time What is the one problem or opportunity you really want to work on? 1, 2, 3
    169. 169. Transdisciplinarity… Theoretical Knowledge Applied Learning Real world problem or opportunity
    170. 170. TEAMS REPORT Answer questions at lunch Prioritize 1, 2, 3 Facilitators - When you return from lunch, write your 1, 2, 3 on your team post it.
    171. 171. TEAMS TASK 3 Mission Zero Time What is the one problem or opportunity you really want to work on? 1, 2, 3 TEAM Lead - When you return from lunch, write your 1, 2, 3 and team name on your team post it.
    172. 172. LUNCH
    173. 173. TEAMS TASK 3 Mission Zero Time What is the one problem or opportunity you really want to work on? 1, 2, 3 Facilitators - When you return from lunch, write your 1, 2, 3 on your team post it.
    174. 174. LUNCH Return
    175. 175. TEAMS REPORT Survey all answers and place a dot by the topics you feel the most strongly about… Please do not vote on your teams chart.
    176. 176. TEAMS REPORT Survey all answers and place a dot by the topics you feel the most strongly about… Please do not vote on your teams chart.
    177. 177. Where are you?
    178. 178. What do Mt. Rushmore, Aerobics, the Human Genome and the Loch Ness Monster have in
    179. 179. GUTZON BORGLUM August 10, 1927
    180. 180. Father of AerobicsKenneth H. Cooper, M.D., M.P.H.
    181. 181. Dr. Susan Naylor & Dawn K Garcia “Initial sequencing and analysis of the human genome” Dr. Susan Naylor Feb. 12, 2001, Journal Nature
    182. 182. SwRI SFBR Founder Thomas Baker Slick Jr. - businessman, inventor, oilman, rancher, engineer, philanthropist, peacemaker, adventurer, and visionary. Tom Slick Professorship of World Peace at the University of Texas Institute for Inventive Research, 1949, Reader’s Digest, 1000 a week, Circus Tent, 114 Viable Mind Science Foundation
    183. 183. SwRI SFBR Tom Slick: Monster Hunter Staring: Nicolas Cage Tom Slick Professorship of World Peace at the University of Texas Institute for Inventive Research, 1949, Reader’s Digest, 1000 a week, Circus Tent, 114 Viable Mind Science Foundation
    184. 184. What defines San Antonio? What does it mean to be a San Antonian?
    185. 185. CACI Northrop Grumman Lockheed Martin General Electric Pratt & Whitney Chromalloy Proxtronics Veridian Mitre OnBoard Soft Secure INFO dNovus Frontline Systems Karta Secure LOGIX Titan Adtech Digital Defense Denim Group
    186. 186. Missions San Jose San Juan Espada Concepci on
    187. 187. Alamo & Frontier Legends
    188. 188. What single technological event altered San Antonio’s economic and historic trajectory forever?
    189. 189. First Aero Squadron, Old # 1 1910 • 1910 First military man to teach himself to fly • Only person to ever learn to fly by mail • First and only military test pilot flying Old No. 1 • First to invent seat belt and wheels • 1911 First to fly more than 100 miles non-stop • First on an operational reconnaissance flight • First to test use of radio in flight Benjamin D. Foulois
    190. 190. Star Film Ranch 1910 Georges Méliès "Viaje a la luna"
    191. 191. 1927 First Academy Award Film
    192. 192. Tom Slick founded SwRI in 1947 on Cable Ranch, 1,200 acres, 2MM feet of labs and facilities, $350 million in contract research in 2003, 1,500 sponsored projects each year, and 2,800 employees. 1947 “Science
    193. 193. Jet Age Office of History San Antonio Air Logistics Center Kelly Air Force Base “Great White Way” B-47 B-58 Hustler B-52 1955 1960 1960
    194. 194. Technicians Technologists PhDs Rise of the Hispanic Middle Class ”Mayor” -- Nelson
    195. 195. Pemmaraju Rao, SFBR Cancer Research: immunodignostic area of steroid hormones Cancer 1958 - 2005
    196. 196. Hall of Fame 1961 - 2002 William A. Mallow, SwRI
    197. 197. 1963 “This Nation has tossed its cap over the wall of space, and we have no choice but to follow it.” --John F. Kennedy, Nov 21, 1963 Man-In-Spac Program
    198. 198. Lt. Colonel Edward White Pilot for Gemini 4, which was a 66- revolution, 4-day mission June 3 - 7, 1965. 1965
    199. 199. John Taboada, Ph.D. Taboada Research Instruments, Inc. 1979 - 2005
    200. 200. 10 patents that have changed the world Cut the number who die from herart disease in half annually. Julio C. Palmaz, M.D. 1988 - Palmaz Stent®
    201. 201. Star Wars: Episode 2, Harry Potter and the Prisoner of Azkaban, Lord of the Rings, The Passion of the Christ, Spider-Man 2, The Matrix, Pirates of the Caribbean, Black Hawk Down, Star Trek Nemesis, AI, Jimmy Neutron, Jurassic Park III, Spy Kids, Charlie’s Angels, The Tim Jenison 1985 - 2005
    202. 202. 2005 HEB Grande Communications International Bank of Commerce Center for Disease Control American Cancer Society Mastercard Chamber of Commerce Minute Maid
    203. 203. SwRI, Training, Simulation and Performance Improvement AETC Holodeck Northrop Grumman 2005
    204. 204. INFO UP BIO NANO COGNO SCIENCE ARTS “Roughly 100 million jobs… cross-disciplinary fields.” NII, Business Week, 10.11.2004 UTSA & UTHSC “Latin Rennisanc e” George Cisneros “$83M Integrated Sciences and Engineering Facility”
    205. 205. William Barker, BBN & Data Race Widely circulated photo of the IMP Team (L to R): Truett Thatch, Bill Bartell (Honeywell), Dave Walden, Jim Geisman, Bob Kahn, Frank Heart, Ben Barker, Marty Thrope, Will Crowther, Severo Ornstein. Not pictured: Bernie Cosell. Entrepreneurial Companies: “Product, Product, Product”
    206. 206. CACI Northrop Grumman Lockheed Martin General Electric Pratt & Whitney Chromalloy Proxtronics Veridian Mitre OnBoard Soft Secure INFO dNovus Frontline Systems Karta Secure LOGIX Titan Adtech Digital Defense Denim Group 1910 - 2005
    207. 207. ITSA Roosevelt PREP ITSA Greg White, UTSA: ”K- PhD” PipelineStartyounger! SaySi!
    208. 208. Brigadier General Robert F. McDermott RETIRED "when the economic history of San Antonio in the 1980s is written, the most influential individual will be McDermott" --Mayor Henry Cisneros President of the Greater San Antonio Chamber of Commerce; initiated the San Antonio Economic Development Council; United San Antonio founder; Engineering program, University of Texas at San Antonio; Texas Research and Technology Foundation, founder; Raised $15MM from H. Ross Perot for
    209. 209. “San Antonio is Moon : Mars City. First man to walk on Mars will be from San Antonio.“ 1957 - 2005 90+ Years Old: Kane, Sinkin and Dr. Juhasz. Maverick: “Can do” as Dr. G.P. Singh from Karta would say! Dr. Francis Kane A founding father of GPS and creator of the GPS International Association, a group for GPS users.
    210. 210. Mars And beyond
    211. 211. Transdisciplinarios
    212. 212. Piensa & Haz
    213. 213. Cómo nos organizamos?
    214. 214. Transdisciplinarity Beyond the disciplines Engaging the real world Learning connected to doing Solving real world problems Little experiments
    215. 215. Transdisciplinarity… Theoretical Knowledge Applied Learning Real world problem or opportunity
    216. 216. What system of technologies, are needed to accomplish your mission?
    217. 217. Mecatrónica La combinación sinergística de la ingeniería mecánica, la ingeniería eléctrica, la ingeniería de “software”, la ingeniería de sistemas de control. Departamentos de Ingeniería Mecánica, Aeroespacial y Nuclear en RPI All Contents Copyright(C) 2001 Mechatronics Lab at RPI
    218. 218. Bio-Mecatrónica La combinación sinergística de la Biología, la ingeniería mecánica, la ingeniería eléctrica, la ingeniería de “software”, la ingeniería de sistemas de control. Adapted from Departamentos de Ingeniería Mecánica, Aeroespacial y Nuclear en RPI All Contents Copyright(C) 2001 Mechatronics Lab at RPI Biología
    219. 219. Mecatrónica Fusión Educativa Instrumentation Electronics Control SystemsMechanical
    220. 220. Instrumentation Electronics Control SystemsBiotechnology Bio-Instrumentación Fusión Educativa
    221. 221. Energía Alternativa Fuel Cell, Wind Energy, Combined Heat and Power Instrumentation Electronics Control SystemsMechanical Fusión Educativa
    222. 222. Tecnología Doméstica Information Technology Electronics Control SystemsMechanical Fusión Educativa
    223. 223. What system of technologies, are needed to accomplish your mission?
    224. 224. “Turbine Techs earn $28-$40K a year… Many techs earning $40K - $80K a year with OT.” – Bryan Gregory, Jr. 11.1.2006, TSTC West TX, Sweetwater
    225. 225. “In most industries you have electricians, mechanics and IT, in wind, you are expected to do everything.” -- Bryan Gregory, Jr. 11.1.2006, TSTC West TX, Sweetwater
    226. 226. Mecatrónica La combinación sinergística de la ingeniería mecánica, la ingeniería eléctrica, la ingeniería de “software”, la ingeniería de sistemas de control. Departamentos de Ingeniería Mecánica, Aeroespacial y Nuclear en RPI All Contents Copyright(C) 2001 Mechatronics Lab at RPI
    227. 227. Job Mergers
    228. 228. Adapted from NSFNEURO NANO BIOINFO 21st Century Architecture
    229. 229. NEURO NANO BIOINFO Adapted from NSF 21st Century Architecture
    230. 230. National Center for Agricultural Utilization Research
    231. 231. Bio-Mecatrónica La combinación sinergística de la Biología, la ingeniería mecánica, la ingeniería eléctrica, la ingeniería de “software”, la ingeniería de sistemas de control. Adapted from Departamentos de Ingeniería Mecánica, Aeroespacial y Nuclear en RPI All Contents Copyright(C) 2001 Mechatronics Lab at RPI Biología
    232. 232. Greener Pathways, White and Walsh, The Apollo Alliance, 2008
    233. 233. Green Jobs
    234. 234. Wind Jobs GreenerPathways,WhiteandWalsh,TheApolloAlliance,2008
    235. 235. “We are the first bio-diesel company in the US.” –Kelly Takaya King, Co-Founder, Pacific BioDiesel
    236. 236. Ethanol and Bio Diesel Jobs GreenerPathways,WhiteandWalsh,TheApolloAlliance,2008
    237. 237. National Center for Agricultural Utilization Research
    238. 238. “In 2006, demand was off the charts. Every graduate had a job 6 months before graduation. Chemical Technology Graduates typically start at $35K and it is not uncommon for them to make $60K-to-$70K per year.” –Robert Hernandez, TSTC
    239. 239. Mechatronics Jobs
    240. 240. Butler Community College April 7 to 11, 2008
    241. 241. “It used to be the sledgehammer mechanic. These days, the technology has advanced so much that our most important tool is our brain. It is more of a thinking man’s game now.” Jeff Nelson Service Manager CAT Skill Mergers
    242. 242. “Tolerances are getting tighter and tighter…” –Patrick Peronnet
    243. 243. “Manufacturing is increasingly more automated— electronics, motors, controls, robots and scheduling.” --ATS, PeoriaTSTC West TX
    244. 244. www.af.mil/news/airman/0104/launch1b.html “Production Engineers [from TSTC] start at $43K- $57K per year at United Launch Alliance.” – Edward Rodriguez, Sr. Manufacturing Engineering Manager, ULA
    245. 245. “Aviation Technicians qualify for two pay raises per year of $1.00 per hour topping out at $54K per year.” –Harvey Hall, American Eagle, Abilene
    246. 246. “Entry-level machinists make $36K-$37K. They top out at $60K but they can earn overtime and up to $7,500 per year for college reimbursement too.” –Chuck Marbut, Bell Helicopter
    247. 247. Butler Community College April 7 to 11, 2008 Frontier El Dorado Refining Company Operator $40K - $60K Instrumentation $40K - $60K Machinist $40K - $60K --Bill Kloeblen, Manager Human Resources
    248. 248. “….we had to upgrade our basic mechanic skills to include programmable logic controllers and electrical systems.” --Dr. Ron Lentsch, Allergan 4/2007, TSTC Waco
    249. 249. Entry-Level R&D Tech $40,000-to-$50,000 4.16.2007, TSTC Waco
    250. 250. Specialized Knowledge & Skills Systems Knowledge & Skills Next Gen Jobs
    251. 251. GM Train
    252. 252. Unskilled Operators Highly Skilled Operators Employment Environment
    253. 253. Butler Community College April 7 to 11, 2008 Spirit AeroSystems “1,000 workers a year needed for the aerospace cluster… 2,000 plus when we are on the up side.” --Jeff Turner, CEO
    254. 254. Butler Community College April 7 to 11, 2008 Spirit AeroSystems Machine Operator Starting - $26,000 2 years -- $32,000 8 years -- $60,000 --Robert Condreay, Staffing Manager
    255. 255. Frontier El Dorado Refining, Butler Community College April 7 to 11, 2008
    256. 256. Tolerances are getting tighter and tighter, we need people who can work with their heads and their hands.
    257. 257. “In this plant, in the next three years we will need nine Instrumentation and Numerical Control (INC) technicians.” Edward C. Trump Plant Manager Entergy 4/2007, TSTC Marshall
    258. 258. Chief Master Sergeant David Wilson, Kansas Air National Guard Kansas Air National Guard, Butler Community College April 7 to 11, 2008
    259. 259. Kansas Air National Guard, Butler Community College April 7 to 11, 2008
    260. 260. Kansas Air National Guard, Butler Community College April 7 to 11, 2008
    261. 261. Kansas Air National Guard, Butler Community College April 7 to 11, 2008
    262. 262. Kansas Air Naitonal Guard, Butler Community College April 7 to 11, 2008
    263. 263. Kansas Air National Guard, Butler Community College April 7 to 11, 2008
    264. 264. Kansas Air National Guard, Butler Community College April 7 to 11, 2008
    265. 265. http://www.itsdocs.fhwa.dot.gov/JPODOCS/REPTS_TE/13599.htmltp://www.roadtraffic-technology.com/contractors/traffic_man/electrosonic/electrosonic1.html C4 Operations Centers Air Land Sea Space Cyber
    266. 266. Skill Mergers ?
    267. 267. Define one or more job titles and job tasks to to accomplish your mission?
    268. 268. Informática Biología QuímicaFísica Ingeniería Scientific and Technological Convergence
    269. 269. What knowledge systems and disciplines are needed to accomplish your mission?
    270. 270. Analysis and Conclusions
    271. 271. STEM Mergers
    272. 272. Dr. David Thornburg, Center for Professional Development and Jim Brazell, VentureRAMP, Inc. ARTS Creativity- Innovation -Design
    273. 273. Mecatrónica La combinación sinergística de la ingeniería mecánica, la ingeniería eléctrica, la ingeniería de “software”, la ingeniería de sistemas de control. Departamentos de Ingeniería Mecánica, Aeroespacial y Nuclear en RPI All Contents Copyright(C) 2001 Mechatronics Lab at RPI
    274. 274. Mechatronics - Robotics • Electronics & Applied Computer Equipment • Biotechnology, Life Science & Medical • Telecommunications & Information Services • Distribution, Transportation & Logistics • Heavy & Special Trade Construction • Energy, Mining & Related Support Services • Petroleum Refining & Chemical • Transportation Equipment • Production Support & Industrial Machinery • Agriculture, Forestry & Food • Aerospace and Aviation • Homeland Security & Defense
    275. 275. Bio-Mecatrónica La combinación sinergística de la Biología, la ingeniería mecánica, la ingeniería eléctrica, la ingeniería de “software”, la ingeniería de sistemas de control. Adapted from Departamentos de Ingeniería Mecánica, Aeroespacial y Nuclear en RPI All Contents Copyright(C) 2001 Mechatronics Lab at RPI Biología
    276. 276. NEURO NANO BIOINFO Adapted from NSF 21st Century Architecture
    277. 277. Job Mergers
    278. 278. Medium to High Pay Jobs Knowledge Jobs Skill Jobs Next Gen Jobs
    279. 279. Academic Mergers
    280. 280. Med-to-High Skill and Professional Jobs General Academics Technical – Workforce Ed Next Gen Ed
    281. 281. What tasks and steps will your team/s need to accomplish its mission? Use DACUM linear model. Realize the process is a spiral development methodology. What do your teams need to be able to do?
    282. 282. What human behavior, tools and equipment and future trends do you need to accomplish your mission?
    283. 283. Part II Revised Technopolis (Kozmetsky) TEAMS Forecasting Tools (Bettersworth) Example Technology Flows DACUM Example Technology Jobs TEAMS PATHWAYS in the USA Example TEAMS Pathways Technopolis TEAMS Strategies for the Technopolis Educational Technology Flow Technology Structure (Sekora) Engineering Production Pipeline R&D&C - Commercialization (Zintgraff)
    284. 284. Maryland Comprehensive Liberal Arts, STEM and CTE Model
    285. 285. Maryland Classroom: CTE: Educating Tomorrow’s Workforce Today, April 2008
    286. 286. Maryland Classroom: CTE: Educating Tomorrow’s Workforce Today, April 2008
    287. 287. Maryland Classroom: CTE: Educating Tomorrow’s Workforce Today, April 2008
    288. 288. What knowledge systems and disciplines are needed to accomplish your mission?
    289. 289. TEAMS Model Schools • High degree of faculty interaction • Integrated curricula • Sequenced courses HS, CTC and University • Transdisciplinary culture
    290. 290. Contextual Theoretical Applied TEAMS
    291. 291. 1,000 MPG eq. Fuel Cell Car
    292. 292. Los Altos Academy of Engineering, La Puente Valley ROP, California
    293. 293. Transdisciplinary Theoretical + Applied + Real WorldProblems
    294. 294. K-12 CTC – Workforce & Technical Programs University Employers Industry, Government, Military and Civil Society Environmental System of Forces Globalization, Demography, Science & Technology
    295. 295. K-12 CTC – Workforce & Technical Programs University Employers Industry, Government, Military and Civil Society Environmental System of Forces Globalization, Demography, Science & Technology
    296. 296. bioCollege Pathway TSTC Harlingen Machining & Industrial Systems Science Fiction to Reality TSTC System & TSTC Harlingen Harlingen & Rio Grande Valley May 13-18, 2007 Defense, Aerospace & Advanced Manufacturing Industry Cluster
    297. 297. bio Jobs Pathway Bell Helicopter, Dallas, TX Machinist Science Fiction to Reality TSTC System & TSTC Harlingen Harlingen & Rio Grande Valley May 13-18, 2007 Defense, Aerospace & Advanced Manufacturing Industry Cluster
    298. 298. Talk Story Maui Community College Maui, HI April 13-20, 2008
    299. 299. K-12 Pathway Kihei Charter School Environmental impact study during the reconstruction of Koie’ie Talk Story Maui Community College Maui, HI April 13-18, 2008 Integrated Defense, Oceanic, Space & Green Tech Industry Cluster
    300. 300. K-12 Pathway Maui Community College Space Systems Summer Camp Talk Story Maui Community College Maui, HI April 13-18, 2008 Integrated Defense, Oceanic, Space & Green Tech Industry Cluster
    301. 301. College Pathway Maui Community College Electronics & Computer Engineering Technology (ECET) Talk Story Maui Community College Maui, HI April 13-18, 2008 Integrated Defense, Oceanic, Space & Green Tech Industry Cluster
    302. 302. Jobs Pathway OceanIT Opto-Mechatronics Technician Talk Story Maui Community College Maui, HI April 13-18, 2008 Integrated Defense, Oceanic, Space & Green Tech Industry Cluster
    303. 303. College Pathway Butler Community College & Wichita State Engineering Industrial Systems Wichita Next Butler Community College Butler County, El Dorado County & Wichita, KS April 6-12, 2008 Defense, Aerospace & Advanced Manufacturing Industry Cluster
    304. 304. Jobs Pathway DJ Engineering Production Engineer & Machinist Wichita Next Butler Community College Butler County, El Dorado County & Wichita, KS April 6-12, 2008 Defense, Aerospace & Advanced Manufacturing Industry Cluster
    305. 305. Super Clusters
    306. 306. K-12 Pathway Orlando Tech Film, Animation & Digital Media Design Convergence Technopolei Digital Media Alliance Florida (DMAF) & Banner Center for Film & Entertainment Technology Workforce Film, Entertainment, Cultural Arts & Modeling-Simulation Industry Cluster State of Florida
    307. 307. University Pathway Florida Interactive Entertainment Academy Film, Animation & Digital Media Design Convergence Technopolei Digital Media Alliance Florida (DMAF) & Banner Center for Film & Entertainment Technology Workforce Film, Entertainment, Cultural Arts & Modeling-Simulation Industry Cluster State of Florida
    308. 308. Jobs Pathway Cinematographer Orlando & I-35 Corridor, FL Convergence Technopolei Digital Media Alliance Florida (DMAF) & Banner Center for Film & Entertainment Technology Workforce Film, Entertainment, Cultural Arts & Modeling-Simulation Industry Cluster State of Florida
    309. 309. Game Builders
    310. 310. Goldberg’s Crew, Houston Community College
    311. 311. GAME TEAMS Los juegos han capturado la imaginación y tiempo de milenios. Apalancar la economía de atención de los juegos para desarrollar la siguiente generación de trabajadores. Necesitamos penetrar el velo del juego y apoyar el aprendizaje constructivista basado en el juego. Lo transdisciplinario es el común denominador. Juegos NANO BIO INFO NEURO Constructor de Juegos = Constructor Atracción Educacional de los EQUIPOS
    312. 312. Mecatrónica La combinación sinergística de la ingeniería mecánica, la ingeniería eléctrica, la ingeniería de “software”, la ingeniería de sistemas de control. Departamentos de Ingeniería Mecánica, Aeroespacial y Nuclear en RPI All Contents Copyright(C) 2001 Mechatronics Lab at RPI
    313. 313. ITSA ITSA Greg White, UTSA: ”K-PhD” PipelineStartyounger!
    314. 314. Primaria Equipos ESPACIALES San Antonio,TX Competencia de Robots más exploración profesional y académica e historia de la ciencia y la teconología.
    315. 315. Equipos ESPACIALES San Antonio,TX Educación Media
    316. 316. Cerebro del Juego de Video Gameboy Sistema de Visión Actuadores Lego y Bloques de Construcción
    317. 317. US First-EISD Andrew Schuetze San Antonio,TX High School
    318. 318. Academia de Verano de los Equipos Espaciales
    319. 319. Bio-Mecatrónica La combinación sinergística de la Biología, la ingeniería mecánica, la ingeniería eléctrica, la ingeniería de “software”, la ingeniería de sistemas de control. Adapted from Departamentos de Ingeniería Mecánica, Aeroespacial y Nuclear en RPI All Contents Copyright(C) 2001 Mechatronics Lab at RPI Biología
    320. 320. LA LIGA FIRST LEGO® REVELA EL RETO 2006 NANO QUEST Más de 80,000 estudiantes de educación media en 34 países exploran el diminuto pero vasto mundo de la nanotecnología La Universidad de Notre Dame y la Universidad Cornell colaboran con FIRST, retando a los estudiantes
    321. 321. “resolver problemas e inventar cosas nunca antes consideradas posibles” LA LIGA FIRST LEGO® REVELA EL RETO 2006 NANO QUEST
    322. 322. Informática Biología QuímicaFísica Ingeniería Scientific and Technological Convergence
    323. 323. Mars And beyond
    324. 324. What kind of youth programs and ed programs will you need to create to deliver the human capability for the mission?
    325. 325. Tools & Techniques
    326. 326. Some stories, Socratic dialogue and some thinking- doing tools…
    327. 327. And a mode shift to doing…
    328. 328. …a shift to transdisciplinarity…
    329. 329. Transdisciplinarios
    330. 330. Piensa & Haz
    331. 331. Cómo nos organizamos?
    332. 332. Transdisciplinarity Beyond the disciplines Engaging the real world Learning connected to doing Solving real world problems Little experiments
    333. 333. Transdisciplinarity… Theoretical Knowledge Applied Learning Real world problem or opportunity
    334. 334. You promise me I/We take responsibility for our learning and what is possible for us today as a individuals and TEAMS.
    335. 335. I promise you By the end of the day we will all answer your questions of Maze by example and we will come to a sense of closure as to why we are here, what we have learned and what we can do with our San Antonio experience.
    336. 336. Mission to Mars Theoretical Knowledge Applied Learning Real world problem or opportunity
    337. 337. Mars And beyond
    338. 338. Transdisciplinarity… Theoretical Knowledge Applied Learning Your Mars Mission Stories
    339. 339. Identity – Name – Logo Mission – Problem and/or opportunities Technology Flow Job Titles Job Tasks Job Tools Job Knowledge (Know) and Skill (Do) Job Behavior and Performance Environment Trends impacting job
    340. 340. Technology Flow

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